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Raymond Hames [10]Raymond B. Hames [2]
  1.  1
    Yanomami: The Fierce Controversy and What We Can Learn From It.Rob Borofsky, Bruce Albert, Raymond Hames, Kim Hill, Lêda Leitão Martins, John Peters & Terence Turner - 2005 - University of California Press.
    _Yanomami_ raises questions central to the field of anthropology—questions concerning the practice of fieldwork, the production of knowledge, and anthropology's intellectual and ethical vision of itself. Using the Yanomami controversy—one of anthropology's most famous and explosive imbroglios—as its starting point, this book draws readers into not only reflecting on but refashioning the very heart and soul of the discipline. It is both the most up-to-date and thorough public discussion of the Yanomami controversy available and an innovative and searching assessment of (...)
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  2.  12
    Pacifying Hunter-Gatherers.Raymond Hames - 2019 - Human Nature 30 (2):155-175.
    There is a well-entrenched schism on the frequency, intensity, and evolutionary significance of warfare among hunter-gatherers compared with large-scale societies. To simplify, Rousseauians argue that warfare among prehistoric and contemporary hunter-gatherers was nearly absent and, if present, was a late cultural invention. In contrast, so-called Hobbesians argue that violence was relatively common but variable among hunter-gatherers. To defend their views, Rousseauians resort to a variety of tactics to diminish the apparent frequency and intensity of hunter-gatherer warfare. These tactics include redefining (...)
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  3.  37
    Women’s Work, Child Care, and Helpers-at-the-Nest in a Hunter-Gatherer Society.Raymond Hames & Patricia Draper - 2004 - Human Nature 15 (4):319-341.
    Considerable research on helpers-at-the-nest demonstrates the positive effects of firstborn daughters on a mother’s reproductive success and the survival of her children compared with women who have firstborn sons. This research is largely restricted to agricultural settings. In the present study we ask: “Does ‘daughter first’ improve mothers’ reproductive success in a hunting and gathering context?” Through an analysis of 84 postreproductive women in this population we find that the sex of the first- or second-born child has no effect on (...)
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  4.  24
    Birth Order, Sibling Investment, and Fertility Among Ju/’Hoansi.Patricia Draper & Raymond Hames - 2000 - Human Nature 11 (2):117-156.
    Birth order has been examined over a wide variety of dimensions in the context of modern populations. A consistent message has been that it is better to be born first. The analysis of birth order in this paper is different in several ways from other investigations into birth order effects. First, we examine the effect of birth order in an egalitarian, small-scale, kin-based society, which has not been done before. Second, we use a different outcome measure, fertility, rather than outcome (...)
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  5.  14
    Meal Sharing Among the Ye’Kwana.Raymond Hames & Carl McCabe - 2007 - Human Nature 18 (1):1-21.
    In this study meal sharing is used as a way of quantifying food transfers between households. Traditional food-sharing studies measure the flow of resources between households. Meal sharing, in contrast, measures food consumption acts according to whether one is a host or a guest in the household as well as the movement of people between households in the context of food consumption. Our goal is to test a number of evolutionary models of food transfers, but first we argue that before (...)
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  6.  27
    Parental Investment and Child Health in a Yanomamö Village Suffering Short-Term Food Stress.Edward H. Hagen, Raymond B. Hames, Nathan M. Craig, Matthew T. Lauer & Michael E. Price - 2001 - Journal of Biosocial Science 33 (4):503-528.
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  7.  23
    Parental Investment and Child Health in a Yanomamö Village Suffering Short Term Food Stress.Hagen H. Edward, Raymond B. Hames, Nathan M. Craig, Matthew T. Lauer & Michael E. Price - 2001 - Journal of Biosocial Science 33 (4):503-528.
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  8.  15
    Statement on the Publication of Alice Dreger’s Investigation, Darkness’s Descent on the American Anthropological Association: A Cautionary Tale. [REVIEW]Jane B. Lancaster & Raymond Hames - 2011 - Human Nature 22 (3):223-224.
  9.  36
    A Survey of Non-Classical Polyandry.Katherine E. Starkweather & Raymond Hames - 2012 - Human Nature 23 (2):149-172.
    We have identified a sample of 53 societies outside of the classical Himalayan and Marquesean area that permit polyandrous unions. Our goal is to broadly describe the demographic, social, marital, and economic characteristics of these societies and to evaluate some hypotheses of the causes of polyandry. We demonstrate that although polyandry is rare it is not as rare as commonly believed, is found worldwide, and is most common in egalitarian societies. We also argue that polyandry likely existed during early human (...)
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  10.  29
    Grandparental Transfers and Kin Selection.Raymond Hames - 2010 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (1):26-27.
    In the analysis of intergenerational transfer, several improvements can be made. First, following kin selection theory, grandparents have kin other than grandchildren in which to invest and therefore any investigation into grandparents should take this perspective. Secondly, how transfers actually enhance the survivorship of younger relatives such as grandchildren must be better measured, especially in the ethnographic literature. Finally, the problem of indirect investments or targeting must be considered.
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  11.  19
    The Purpose of Exchange Helps Shape the Mode of Exchange.Raymond Hames - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (4):564-565.
    In his state-of-the-art review, Gurven compares evolutionary theories of food transfers in ethnographic settings. Although this is useful, I suggest that one must first try to determine the utility of food transfers before making predictions about which parties ought to receive food. In addition, I argue that tests of kin selection theory present a special problem in food transfers.
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  12.  12
    Diversity in Human Behavioral Ecology.Raymond Hames - 2014 - Human Nature 25 (4):443-447.
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