67 found
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  1.  36
    Pier Vincenzo Cova: Il poeta Vario. (Scienze filologiche e storia, Brescia, 2.) Pp. 144. Milan: Vita e Pensiero: Pubblicazioni della Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore. Paper, L. 20,000. [REVIEW]S. J. Harrison - 1990 - The Classical Review 40 (2):487-487.
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  2.  23
    Apuleius: A Latin Sophist.S. J. Harrison - 2004 - Oxford University Press.
    This book provides the first general account of the works of the Latin writer Apuleius, most famous for his great novel the `Metamorphoses' or `Golden Ass'. Living in second-century North Africa, Apuleius was more than an author; he was an orator and professional intellectual, Platonist philosopher, extraordinary stylist, relentless self-promoter, as well as a versatile author of a remarkably diverse body of other work, much of which is lost to us.
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  3.  29
    Severin Koster: Ille Ego Qui: Dichter zwischen Wort und Macht. (Erlanger Forschungen Reihe A, Geisteswissenschaften, Band 42.) Pp. 115. Erlangen: Univ.-Bibliothek Erlangen-Nürnberg, 1988. Paper, DM 28. [REVIEW]S. J. Harrison - 1989 - The Classical Review 39 (2):399-399.
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  4.  21
    Three Notes on Apuleius.S. J. Harrison - 1988 - Classical Quarterly 38 (1):265-267.
    I quote Griffiths' translation: ‘A crown of many designs with all kinds of flowers had girt her lofty head; in its centre a flat disk above the forehead shone with a clear light in the manner of a mirror or indeed the moon, while on its right and left it was embraced by coils of uprising snakes; from above it was adorned also with outstretched ears of corn’. This is the detailed description of the crown worn by Isis in her (...)
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  5.  51
    Vergilian Varieties Richard A. Cardwell, Janet Hamilton (Edd.): Virgil in a Cultural Tradition. Essays to Celebrate the Bimillennium. (University of Nottingham Monographs in the Humanities, 4.) Pp. Iii+146. University of Nottingham, 1986. Paper. J. D. Bernard (Ed.): Virgil at 2000. Commemorative Essays on the Poet and His Influence. (A.M.S. Ars Poetica, 3.) Pp. Xiv + 342; 12 Plates. New York: A.M.S. Press, 1986. $30.50. [REVIEW]S. J. Harrison - 1987 - The Classical Review 37 (02):175-177.
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  6.  7
    Baltes, Lakmann , Dillon, Donini, Häfner, Karfíková Apuleius: De deo Socratis. Über den Gott des Sokrates. Eingeleitet, übersetzt und mit interpretierenden Essays versehen. Pp. 230. Darmstadt: Wissenschaftliche Buchgesellschaft, 2004. Cased, SFr 49.90, €29.90. ISBN: 3-534-15573-4. [REVIEW]S. J. Harrison - 2006 - The Classical Review 56 (1):139-141.
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  7.  17
    The Lark Ascending: Corydon, Corydon (Vergil, Ecl. 7.70).S. J. Harrison - 1998 - Classical Quarterly 48 (01):310-.
    At the end of the singing contest of Thyrsis and Corydon in the seventh Eclogue, the narrator Meliboeus summarizes its result in the poem's last lines.
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  8.  9
    Cicero and 'Crurifragium'.S. J. Harrison - 1983 - Classical Quarterly 33 (02):453-.
    Quid enim? si Daphitae fatum fuit ex equo cadere atque ita perire, ex hocne equo, qui cum equus non esset nomen habebat alienum ? aut Philippus hasne in capulo quadrigulas vitare monebatur? quasi vero capulo sit occisus. Quid autem magnum aut naufragum illum sine nomine in rivo esse lapsum – quamquam huic quidem his scribit in aqua esse pereundum? ne hercule Icadii quidem praedonis video fatum ullum; nihil enim scribit ei praedictum: quid mirum igitur ex spelunca saxum in crura eius (...)
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  9.  24
    The Speaking Book: The Prologue to Apuleius' Metamorphoses.S. J. Harrison - 1990 - Classical Quarterly 40 (02):507-.
    at ego tibi sermone isto Milesio varias fabulas conseram auresque tuas benivolas lepido susurro permulceam, modo si papyrum Aegyptiam argutia Nilotici calami inscriptam non spreveris inspicere. figuras fortunasque hominum in alias imagines conversas et in se rursum mutuo nexu refectas, ut mireris, exordior. ‘quis ille?’ paucis accipe. Hymettos Attica et Isthmos Ephyrea et Taenaros Spartiatica, glebae felices aeternum libris felicioribus conditae, mea vetus prosapia est; ibi linguam Atthidem primis pueritiae stipendiis merui, mox in urbe Latia advena studiorum Quiritium indigenam sermonem (...)
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  10.  13
    A Note on Euripides, Medea 12.S. J. Harrison - 1986 - Classical Quarterly 36 (01):260-.
    Euripides, Medea 11–13 :12 πολιτν codd. et Σbv; πολίταις V3, sicut coni. Barnes 13 ατ Sakorrphos; ατή codd. et gE et Stob. 4.23.30In his recent discussion of this passage , Diggle has convincingly argued for πολίταις and ατ, the latter of which he places in his new Oxford text, but recognises that υγ remains highly problematic : ‘The truth, I think, is still to seek’. It is to this last difficulty that I should like to suggest a solution.The problems of (...)
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  11.  31
    Soracte Scrutinised Lowell Edmunds: From a Sabine Jar: Reading Horace, Odes 1.9. Pp. Xviii + 159. Chapel Hill, N.C. And London: University of North Carolina Press, 1992. $27.45. [REVIEW]S. J. Harrison - 1993 - The Classical Review 43 (01):48-50.
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  12.  42
    Partial Prophecies James J. O'Hara: Death and the Optimistic Prophecy in Vergil's Aeneid. Pp. Xii + 207. Princeton University Press, 1990. $32.50. [REVIEW]S. J. Harrison - 1991 - The Classical Review 41 (02):327-328.
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  13.  6
    Halls Full of Girls? Catullus 89.3.S. J. Harrison - 2001 - Classical Quarterly 51 (1):304-305.
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  14.  28
    Virgil's Iliad K. W. Gransden: Virgil's Iliad. An Essay on Epic Narrative. Pp. X + 221. Cambridge University Press, 1984. £22.50 (Paper, £7.95). [REVIEW]S. J. Harrison - 1986 - The Classical Review 36 (01):38-40.
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  15.  40
    Colouring the Aeneid R. J. Edgeworth: The Colors of the Aeneid. (American University Studies, 17.) Pp. Xvi+334. New York, Paris, Bern, Frankfurt Am Main: Peter Lang, 1992. DM 33. [REVIEW]S. J. Harrison - 1994 - The Classical Review 44 (02):277-278.
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  16.  18
    Two Notes on Horace, Epodes (10, 16).S. J. Harrison - 1989 - Classical Quarterly 39 (01):271-.
    Epode 10: the Mystery of Mevius' Crime Horace's tenth Epode, an inverse propempticon, calls down dire curses on the head of a man named Mevius as he leaves on a sea-voyage.1 Scholars have naturally been interested in what Mevius had done to merit such treatment, but answers have been difficult to find, for nothing explicit is said on this topic in the poem; as Leo noted, ‘[Horatius] ne verbo quidem tarn gravis odii causam indicat’. This is in direct contrast with (...)
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  17.  39
    Aeneas Analysed C. J. Mackie: The Characterisation of Aeneas. (Scottish Classical Studies, 4.) Pp. X + 247. Edinburgh: Scottish Academic Press, 1988. £12.50. [REVIEW]S. J. Harrison - 1991 - The Classical Review 41 (01):54-55.
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  18.  26
    Donkey Business Carl C. Schlam: The Metamorphoses of Apuleius: On Making an Ass of Oneself. Pp. X + 176; 6 Black and White Figures. London: Duckworth, 1992. £25. [REVIEW]S. J. Harrison - 1993 - The Classical Review 43 (01):63-64.
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  19.  21
    Donkey Business. [REVIEW]S. J. Harrison - 1993 - The Classical Review 43 (1):63-64.
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  20.  8
    The Arms of Capaneus: Statius, Thebaid 4.165–77.S. J. Harrison - 1992 - Classical Quarterly 42 (01):247-.
    The lack of a separate commentary on the fourth book of Statius' Thebaid has meant that many significant details in this description of Capaneus in the catalogue of the Seven have gone unremarked. This article aims to fill the deficiency, pointing out the rich literary allusions, artful symbolism and the careful use of language in this well written passage.
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  21.  14
    Deflating the Odes: Horace, Epistles 1.20.S. J. Harrison - 1988 - Classical Quarterly 38 (02):473-.
    Epistles 1.20, the last poem of its book, begins with an elaborate joke on the entry of Horace's book of epistles into the world and ends with a well-known σραγς describing the poet himself. It will be argued here that this final poem recalls and subverts the pretensions of two earlier final poems in Horace's own Odes, and that its good-humoured depreciation of Horace himself is matched by a similar attitude towards his previous grand poetic claims as a lyric vates.
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  22.  15
    Philosophical Imagery in Horace, Odes 3.5.S. J. Harrison - 1986 - Classical Quarterly 36 (02):502-.
    The high moral tone of Horace's Reguhls ode makes it unsurprising that the poet should employ the traditional imagery of philosophers, both in the speech of Regulus and in the final simile. I should like here to point out some instances which seem to have escaped the notice of commentators.This passage is intended to illustrate the lost ‘virtus’ of the prisoners in Carthage, who, Regulus claims, will be of no greater use to the Romans if ransomed since they were cowardly (...)
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  23.  24
    Rosalba Dimundo: Properzio 4.7: Dalla variante di un modello letterario alla costante di una unità tematica. (Scrinia, 1.) Pp. xviii + 214. Bari: Edipuglia, 1990. Paper, L. 22,000. [REVIEW]S. J. Harrison - 1992 - The Classical Review 42 (01):193-.
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  24.  13
    Augustus, the Poets, and the Spolia Opima.S. J. Harrison - 1989 - Classical Quarterly 39 (02):408-.
    The winning of the ultimate military honour of spolia opima, spoils taken personally from an enemy commander killed by a Roman commander, traditionally occurred only three times in Roman history, the winners being Romulus in the legendary period, A. Cornelius Cossus in either 437 or 426 and M. Claudius Marcellus in 222 B.C.1 The dedication-place of these special spoils was the temple of Jupiter Feretrius on the Capitol, traditionally founded by Romulus for the purpose, and considered the oldest temple in (...)
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  25.  8
    Discordia Taetra: The History of a Hexameter-Ending.S. J. Harrison - 1991 - Classical Quarterly 41 (01):138-.
    In Latin Hexameter Verse, his 1903 manual for composers of Latin hexameters which is still useful as a guide to Vergil's metrical and prosodic practices, S. E. Winbolt states that a hexameter ‘must not end with an adjective preceded by a noun with a similar short ending, e.g.…flumina nota’ unless the adjective is emphatic, ‘i.e. strongly distinctive, predicative or antithetical’. Whether or not his distinction between emphatic and non-emphatic adjectives in this position is wholly workable , Winbolt here rightly detects (...)
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  26.  32
    The Cost of Power J. H. Bishop: The Cost of Power: Studies in the Aeneid of Virgil. (University of New England Monographs, 4.) Pp. Iv + 369. Armidale, N.S.W.: University of New England, 1988. Paper. [REVIEW]S. J. Harrison - 1990 - The Classical Review 40 (02):264-266.
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  27.  18
    Tales of Turnus.S. J. Harrison - 1986 - The Classical Review 36 (01):40-.
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  28.  22
    Allegorizing the Aeneid. [REVIEW]S. J. Harrison - 1996 - The Classical Review 46 (1):19-21.
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  29.  29
    The New Loeb Apuleius J. Arthur Hanson (Ed., Tr.): Apuleius, Metamorphoses. (Loeb Classical Library.) 2 Vols. Vol. I, Books I–VI: Pp. Xvii + 371; Vol. II, Books VII–XI: Pp. Vi + 377. Cambridge, MA and London: Harvard University Press, 1989. £9.95 Per Vol. [REVIEW]S. J. Harrison - 1991 - The Classical Review 41 (01):83-84.
  30.  31
    L. Ceccarelli: L'allitterazione a vocale interposta variabile in Virgilio. (Collana di Filologia Classica, 4.) Pp. vi+186. Rome: Japadre, 1986. Paper, L. 25,000. [REVIEW]S. J. Harrison - 1988 - The Classical Review 38 (02):411-412.
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  31.  4
    Actas del VII Simposio Nacional de Estudios Clásicos . Pp. xvi + 484; frontispiece. Buenos Aires: Associación Argentina de Estudios Clásicos, 1986. Paper. [REVIEW]S. J. Harrison - 1991 - The Classical Review 41 (1):233-233.
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  32.  30
    Ovid Decoded? Frederick Ahl: Metaformations. Soundplay and Wordplay in Ovid and Other Classical Poets. Pp. 352. Ithaca, N.Y. And London: Cornell University Press, 1985. $32.95. [REVIEW]S. J. Harrison - 1986 - The Classical Review 36 (02):236-237.
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  33.  6
    Evander, Jupiter and Arcadia.S. J. Harrison - 1984 - Classical Quarterly 34 (02):487-.
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  34.  20
    Tales of Turnus Peter Schenk: Die Gestalt des Turnus in Vergils Aeneis. (Beiträge zur klassischen Philologie, 164.) Pp. 420. Königstein/Ts.: Anton Hain, 1984. DM. 74. Cornelia Renger: Aeneas und Turnus. Analyse einer Feindschaft. (Studien zur klassischen Philologie, 11.) Pp. 109. Frankfurt am Main/Berne: Peter Lang, 1985. Paper, Sw. Fr. 27. [REVIEW]S. J. Harrison - 1986 - The Classical Review 36 (01):40-44.
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  35.  15
    Hot or Strong? A Textual Note on Seneca, Phoenissae 254.S. J. Harrison - 2003 - Classical Quarterly 53 (2):633-634.
  36.  15
    Soracte Scrutinised.S. J. Harrison - 1993 - The Classical Review 43 (01):48-.
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  37.  18
    Actas del VII Simposio Nacional de Estudios Clásicos (Buenos Aires, 1982). Pp. xvi + 484; frontispiece. Buenos Aires: Associación Argentina de Estudios Clásicos, 1986. Paper. [REVIEW]S. J. Harrison - 1991 - The Classical Review 41 (01):233-.
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  38.  16
    Dividing the Dinner: Book Divisions in Petronius' Cena Trimalchionis.S. J. Harrison - 1998 - Classical Quarterly 48 (02):580-585.
    The information transmitted on the numeration of the books of Petronius' Satyrica is notoriously contradictory. Parts of the extant fragmentary text are variously assigned to Books 14–16: the testimonia are clearly set out in Muller's recent fourth edition , and briefly discussed by Sullivan: of Müller's testimonia, no. 10 places Sat. 89.1 in Book 15, no. 13 puts Sat. 20.5 in Book 14, no. 21 identifies the Cena Trimalchionis as Book 15, and no. 22 suggests that excerpts from Sat. 6–141 (...)
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  39.  17
    A Roman Hecale: Ovid Fasti 3.661–74.S. J. Harrison - 1993 - Classical Quarterly 43 (02):455-.
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  40.  24
    Baltes (M.), Lakmann (M.-L.), Dillon (J.M.), Donini (P.), Häfner (R.), Karfíková (L.) Apuleius: De deo Socratis. Über den Gott des Sokrates . Eingeleitet, übersetzt und mit interpretierenden Essays versehen . (SAPERE: Scripta Antiquitatis Posterioris ad Ethicam Religionemque Pertinentia 7.) Pp. 230. Darmstadt: Wissenschaftliche Buchgesellschaft, 2004. Cased, SFr 49.90, €29.90. ISBN: 3-534-15573-. [REVIEW]S. J. Harrison - 2006 - The Classical Review 56 (01):139-.
  41.  20
    M. Janan: ' When the Lamp is Shattered'. Desire and Narrative in Catullus. Pp. Xviii+204. Carbondale, Edwardsville: Southern Illinois University Press, 1994. Cased. [REVIEW]S. J. Harrison - 1995 - The Classical Review 45 (02):441-442.
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  42.  23
    Virgil and the Conspiracy Theorists R. F. Thomas: Virgil and the Augustan Reception . Pp. XX + 324. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2001. Cased, +40. Isbn: 0-521-78288-. [REVIEW]S. J. Harrison - 2002 - The Classical Review 52 (02):292-.
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  43.  21
    Mythological Incest: Catullus 88.S. J. Harrison - 1996 - Classical Quarterly 46 (02):581-.
    Here Gellius, also the target of poems 74, 80, 89, 90, 91 and 116, is accused of incest with his mother, sister, and aunt. This accusation is coupled with the only extended mythological reference to be found in the group of short Catullan epigrams 69–116:2 not even Tethys or Oceanus can wash out Gellius' crimes. This notion that large bodies of water are unable to wash away the stain of crime is of course a topos going back to Greek tragedy, (...)
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  44.  20
    Reception (K.) Merten Antike Mythen – Mythos Antike. Posthumanistische Antikerezeption in der englischsprachigen Lyrik der Gegenwart. Munich: Wilhelm Fink Verlag, 2004. Pp. 353. 60. 9783770538713. [REVIEW]S. J. Harrison - 2007 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 127:261-.
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  45.  10
    A Note on Apuleius, Metamorphoses 4.31.S. J. Harrison - 1991 - Classical Quarterly 41 (02):562-.
    Sic effata et osculis hiantibus filium diu ac pressule saviata proximas oras reflui litoris petit, plantisque roseis vibrantium fluctuum summo rore calcato ecce iam profundi mans sudo resedit vertice, et ipsum quod incipit velle, set statim, quasi pridem praeceperit, non moratur marinum obsequium: adsunt Nerei filiae chorum canentes et Portunus caerulis barbis hispidus et gravis piscoso sinu Salacia et auriga parvulus delphini Palaemon….
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  46.  17
    The New Loeb Apuleius.S. J. Harrison - 1991 - The Classical Review 41 (01):83-.
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  47.  14
    Vergilian Varieties.S. J. Harrison - 1987 - The Classical Review 37 (02):175-.
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  48.  10
    Ferox Scelerum? A Note on Tacitus, Annals 4.12.2.S. J. Harrison - 1994 - Classical Quarterly 44 (02):557-.
    Commentators on this passage have drawn attention to the unusual genitive in the phrase ferox scelerum, ‘fierce in his crimes’: ‘this adj. seems here alone to take an objective genitive’, says Furneaux, while Martin and Woodman state that ‘the dependent genitive of an external attribute, evidently on the analogy of its use with personal characteristics , seems unparalleled and is perhaps intended to suggest that Sejanus' criminality was innate’. Most commentators add a reference to Sallust's description of Jugurtha as sceleribus (...)
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  49.  7
    Menander's Thais and Catullus' Lesbia.S. J. Harrison - 2015 - Classical Quarterly 65 (2):887-888.
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  50.  6
    Lucretius, Euripides and the Philosophers: De Rerum Natura 5.13–21.S. J. Harrison - 1990 - Classical Quarterly 40 (01):195-.
    Here in the proem to his fifth book Lucretius is praising the philosophical achievements or discoveries of Epicurus through favourable comparison with other discoveries of traditional heroic or divine figures; first, in this passage, with the products of bread and wine associated with the gods Ceres and Liber , and later with the deeds of the god-hero Hercules. This technique clearly derives from the σγκρισις of formal rhetoric, one of the basic exercises through which composition was taught in ancient schools, (...)
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