About this topic
Summary

Titus Lucretius Carus (c. 99 – 55 BC) was a Roman poet and philosopher. He is author of the Latin epic poem De rerum natura (On the Nature of Things), comprised of six books in hexameter verse that address topics in Epicurean philosophy, including the atomic theory, the nature of the gods, freewill and determinism, the nature of mind and soul, sensation and thought, cosmogony, how the physical world is ordered and regulated, and the development of human civilization. The poem is a key source for our knowledge of Epicureanism and it had a major impact on Western thought in the Enlightenment and early modern period.

Key works

The most accessible English translation of Lucretius’ De rerum natura, with facing Latin text, is the Loeb edition of W. H. D. Rouse (revised M . F. Smith) Rouse & Smith 1975. There is also a verse translation by R. Melville in the Oxford World’s Classics Series with a good introduction by D. P. Fowler Melville & Fowler 1999. The collected papers in Algra et al 1997, Gale 2007, and Gillespie & Hardie 2007 highlight a range of literary and philosophical approaches to Lucretius.

Introductions David Sedley offers the best introductory article on Lucretius Sedley 2013.  
Related categories
Siblings:

1082 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 1082
  1. See Also Corpuscularianism.Diego Jose Abad, Aemilius Macer, Mark Akenside, Luigi Alamanni, Aldus Manutius, William Alexander, Ara Pacis & Matthew Arnold - 2007 - In Stuart Gillespie & Philip R. Hardie (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Lucretius. Cambridge University Press.
  2. Lukrez Und der Mythos.Erich Ackermann - 1979
  3. Philosophy in the Hellenistic and Roman Worlds: A History of Philosophy Wthout Any Gaps, Volume 2.Peter Adamson - 2015 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Peter Adamson offers an accessible, humorous tour through a period of eight hundred years when some of the most influential of all schools of thought were formed. He introduces us to Cynics and Skeptics, Epicureans and Stoics, emperors and slaves, and traces the development of early Christian philosophy and of ancient science. A major theme of the book is in fact the competition between pagan and Christian philosophy in this period, and the Jewish tradition appears in the shape of Philo (...)
  4. Epicurean Political Philosophy: The De Rerum Natura of Lucretius. [REVIEW]Thomas W. Africa - 1979 - International Studies in Philosophy 11:213-214.
  5. Die Platonische Zahl Und Einige Conjecturen Zu Platon, Sowie Zu Lukrez.Georg Albert - 1896 - A. Hölder.
  6. The Epicurean Theory of Law and Justice.Antonina Alberti - 1995 - In André Laks & Malcolm Schofield (eds.), Justice and Generosity: Studies in Hellenistic Social and Political Philosophy: Proceedings of the Sixth Symposium Hellenisticum. Cambridge University Press. pp. 161--90.
  7. The religious paradigm: Lucretius and the critique of religion as an instrument of power.Roman Alcala - 1996 - Endoxa 7:115-133.
  8. Lucretius and His Intellectual Background, Amsterdam: Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences.K. A. Algra, M. H. Koenen & P. H. Schrijvers - 1997
  9. Hellenistic Philosophy. [REVIEW]Keimpe Algra - 2000 - Phronesis 45 (1):77-86.
  10. Walking Images: Epicurean Catoptrics in Lucretius DRN IV 318-323.Keimpe Algra - 1999 - Elenchos: Rivista di Studi Sul Pensiero Antico 20 (2):359-380.
  11. Aristotle and Hellenistic Philosophy. [REVIEW]Keimpe Algra - 1998 - Phronesis 44 (2):150-161.
  12. Lucretius and the Epicurean Other.Keimpe Algra - 1997 - In Keimpe Algra, M. H. Koenen & P. H. Schrijvers (eds.), Lucretius and his Intellectual Background. Koninklijke Nederlandse Adademie Van Wetenschappen.
  13. Lucretius and His Intellectual Background: [Proceedings of the Colloquium, Amsterdam, 26-28 June 1996].Keimpe Algra, M. H. Koenen & P. H. Schrijvers (eds.) - 1997 - Koninklijke Nederlandse Adademie Van Wetenschappen.
  14. Lucretius, D.R.N. 5.948.Archibald Allen - 1996 - Classical Quarterly 46 (01):304-.
    In his account of primitive people in D.R.N. 5 Lucretius says that they led a wandering, nomadic sort of existence ; ignorant of agriculture and husbandry, they were content to eat nuts and berries and the like , while streams and springs called them to quench their thirst : denique nota vagis silvestria templa tenebant nympharum… The rest of the sentence is a lush description of the streams which welled up from those woodland shrines, washing over rocks and moss, and (...)
  15. Lucretius, D.R.N. 5.948.Archibald Allen - 1996 - Classical Quarterly 46 (1):304-305.
    In his account of primitive people in D.R.N. 5 Lucretius says that they led a wandering, nomadic sort of existence ; ignorant of agriculture and husbandry, they were content to eat nuts and berries and the like, while streams and springs called them to quench their thirst : denique nota vagis silvestria templa tenebant nympharum… The rest of the sentence is a lush description of the streams which welled up from those woodland shrines, washing over rocks and moss, and sometimes (...)
  16. Lucretius' Laughing Shoes.Archibald Allen - 1976 - Hermes 104 (2):247.
  17. Hellenistic Philosophy of Mind.Julia E. Annas - 1992 - University of California Press.
    "Hellenistic Philosophy of Mind" is an elegant survey of Stoic and Epicurean ideas about the soul an introduction to two ancient schools whose belief in the soul's physicality offer compelling parallels to modern approaches in the ...
  18. Affirmative Naturalism : Deleuze and Epicurianism.Keith Ansell-Pearson - unknown
    In this essay I explore the nature of Deleuze’s commitment to an affirmative naturalism that is based on certain Epicurean principles and insights. The essay is divided into two main parts. In the first part I bring to light some of the key features of Lucretius’s great poem on the nature of things, and I do so with the aid of Bergson and his reading of the teaching as fundamentally melancholic. In the second part I switch my attention to Deleuze (...)
  19. Affirmative Naturalism: Deleuze and Epicureanism.Keith Ansell-Pearson - 2014 - Cosmos and History 10 (2):121-137.
    In this essay I explore the nature of Deleuze’s commitment to an affirmative naturalism that is based on certain Epicurean principles and insights. The essay is divided into two main parts. In the first part I bring to light some of the key features of Lucretius’s great poem on the nature of things, and I do so with the aid of Bergson and his reading of the teaching as fundamentally melancholic. In the second part I switch my attention to Deleuze (...)
  20. Thomas Sprat's 'The Plague of Athens': Thucydides, Lucretius and the 'Pindaric Way'.Raymond A. Anselment - 1996 - Bulletin of the John Rylands Library 78 (1):3-20.
  21. Epicurus and Lucretius on Sex, Love and Marriage.B. Arkins - 1984 - Apeiron 18 (2):141 - 143.
  22. Epicurean Justice.John Armstrong - 1997 - Phronesis 42 (3):324-334.
    Epicurus is one of the first social contract theorists, holding that justice is an agreement neither to harm nor be harmed. He also says that living justly is necessary and sufficient for living pleasantly, which is the Epicurean goal. Some say that there are two accounts of justice in Epicurus -- one as a personal virtue, the other as a virtue of institutions. I argue that the personal virtue derives from compliance with just social institutions, and so we need to (...)
  23. Lucretius and the Fears of Death.Peter Aronoff - 1997 - Dissertation, Cornell University
    The Epicureans argued that death was nothing to us and that we should not fear death, and this thesis takes up these arguments as they appear in our fullest extant source, the De Rerum Natura of Lucretius. After an initial look at the general Epicurean theory of emotions, the thesis narrows in on the fears of death. Lucretius starts from a popular dichotomy concerning death: death is either the utter destruction of the person who dies, or the person survives in (...)
  24. Lucretius Poet & Philosopher by E. E. Sikes. [REVIEW]M. Ashley-Montagu - 1937 - Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 27:70-72.
  25. Lucretius Poet & Philosopher. E. E. Sikes.M. F. Ashley-Montagu - 1937 - Isis 27 (1):70-72.
  26. Lucretius' New World Order: Making a Pact with Nature.Elizabeth Asmis - 2008 - Classical Quarterly 58 (1):141-157.
  27. Lucretius' New World Order: Making A Pact With Nature.Elizabeth Asmis - 2008 - Classical Quarterly 58 (1):141-157.
  28. Lucretius Venus and Stoic Zeus.Elizabeth Asmis - 2007 - In Monica Gale (ed.), Hermes. Oxford University Press. pp. 458-470.
  29. Free Action and the Swerve: Review of Walter G. Englert, "Epicurus on the Swerve and Voluntary Action". [REVIEW]Elizabeth Asmis - 1990 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 8:275.
  30. Diskin Clay, "Lucretius and Epicurus". [REVIEW]Elizabeth Asmis - 1985 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 23 (3):424.
  31. Lucretius and Epicurus.Elizabeth Asmis - 1985 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 23 (3):424-425.
  32. Rhetoric and Reason in Lucretius.Elizabeth Asmis - 1983 - Johns Hopkins University Press.
  33. Lucretius' Venus and Stoic Zeus.Elizabeth Asmis - 1982 - Hermes 110 (4):458-470.
  34. The Epicurean Theory of Free Will and its Origins in Aristotle.Elizabeth Asmis - 1970 - Dissertation, Yale University
  35. Reductionism, Rationality and Responsibility: A Discussion of Tim O'Keefe, Epicurus on Freedom.Catherine Atherton - 2007 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 89 (2):192-230.
    O'Keefe's contention that Epicurus devised the atomic swerve to counter a threat to the efficacy of reason posed by the thesis that the future is fixed regardless of what we do, is not supported by the evidence he adduces. Epicurus' own words in On nature XXV, and testimony from Lucretius and Cicero, tell far more strongly in favour of the traditional view, that Epicurus' concerns were causal determinism and its threat to moral responsiblity for our actions and characters.
  36. Lucretius on What Language is Not.Catherine Atherton - 2005 - In Dorothea Frede Brad Inwood (ed.), Language and Learning: Philosophy of Language in the Hellenistic Age. Cambridge University Press. pp. 101–38.
  37. Philosophy on Poetry, Philosophy in Poetry.Robin Attfield - 2008 - In Jinfen Yan & David E. Schrader (eds.), Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy. Edwin Mellen Press. pp. 13-19.
    The relations of philosophy and poetry include but are not exhausted by Plato’s hostility to mimetic poetry in the Republic and Aristotle’s defence of it in the Poetics. For poetry has often carried a philosophical message itself, from the work of Chaucer and Milton to that of T.S. Eliot. In yet earlier generations, poetry was chosen as the medium for conveying a philosophical message by (among Greek philosophers) Xenophanes, Parmenides and Empedocles, and (at Rome) by Lucretius, who struggled both with (...)
  38. Lucretius Poet and Philosopher. [REVIEW]R. G. Austin - 1936 - The Classical Review 50 (4):132-132.
  39. Lucretius the Poet E. E. Sikes: Lucretius Poet and Philosopher. Pp. Ix + 187. Cambridge: University Press, 1936. Cloth, 7s. 6d. [REVIEW]R. G. Austin - 1936 - The Classical Review 50 (04):132-.
  40. Nequid or Nequod in Lucretius.I. Avotins - 1998 - Mnemosyne 51 (5):585-590.
  41. The Question of Mens in Lucretius 2.289.I. Avotins - 1979 - Classical Quarterly 29 (01):95-.
    One of the most widely accepted emendations in Lucretius has been the change by Lambinus in 2.289 of the manuscript reading res to mens. For instance, of the major editors since Lachmann only Bockemüller, Merrill in his 1917 edition, and Martin in his Teubner editions have printed res. Also, few emendations in Lucretius are of equal significance for Epicurean doctrine because, as will be shown, some conclusions of important recent scholarship depend on the acceptance of the reading mens.
  42. The Question of Mens in Lucretius 2.289.I. Avotins - 1979 - Classical Quarterly 29 (1):95-100.
    One of the most widely accepted emendations in Lucretius has been the change by Lambinus in 2.289 of the manuscript reading res to mens. For instance, of the major editors since Lachmann only Bockemüller, Merrill in his 1917 edition, and Martin in his Teubner editions have printed res. Also, few emendations in Lucretius are of equal significance for Epicurean doctrine because, as will be shown, some conclusions of important recent scholarship depend on the acceptance of the reading mens.
  43. On Some Epicurean and Lucretian Arguments for the Infinity of the Universe.Ivars Avotins - 1983 - Classical Quarterly 33 (2):421-427.
    As is well known, Epicurus and his followers held that the universe was infinite and f that its two primary components, void and atoms, were each infinite. The void was infinite in extension, the atoms were infinite in number and their total was infinite also in extension. The chief Epicurean proofs of these infinities are found in Epicurus, Ad Herod. 41–2, and in Lucretius 1.951–1020. As far as I can see, both the commentators to these works and writers on Epicurean (...)
  44. On Some Epicurean and Lucretian Arguments for the Infinity of the Universe.Ivars Avotins - 1983 - Classical Quarterly 33 (02):421-.
    As is well known, Epicurus and his followers held that the universe was infinite and f that its two primary components, void and atoms, were each infinite. The void was infinite in extension, the atoms were infinite in number and their total was infinite also in extension. The chief Epicurean proofs of these infinities are found in Epicurus, Ad Herod. 41–2, and in Lucretius 1.951–1020. As far as I can see, both the commentators to these works and writers on Epicurean (...)
  45. Lucrezio. By Vittorio Enzo Alfieri. Pp. 222; Reproduction of Frontispiece of Lambinus' Lucretius, 1563. Florence: Felicele Monnier, 1929. [REVIEW]C. Bailey - 1929 - The Classical Review 43 (06):242-.
  46. Duff's Lucretius I T. Lucreti Cari de Rerum Natura Liber Primus. Edited, with Introduction, Notes, and Index, by J. D. Duff, M.A., Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge. One Vol. Pp. Xxvi + 136. Cambridge: At the University Press, 1923. 4s. [REVIEW]C. Bailey - 1923 - The Classical Review 37 (5-6):119-120.
  47. Duff's Lucretius I. [REVIEW]C. Bailey - 1923 - The Classical Review 37 (5-6):119-120.
  48. A New Verse Translation Of Lucretius. [REVIEW]C. Bailey - 1920 - The Classical Review 34 (5-6):118-120.
  49. A New Verse Translation of Lucretius Lucretius on the Nature of Things. Translated From Latin Into English Verse by Sir Robert Allison. Arthur L. Humphreys. 1919. 7s. 6d. [REVIEW]C. Bailey - 1920 - The Classical Review 34 (5-6):118-120.
  50. A New Essay on Lucretius De Lucretiani Libri Primi Condicione ac Retractatione. Scripsit Joachimus Mussehl. Berlin: G. Schmidt, 1912. [REVIEW]C. Bailey - 1913 - The Classical Review 27 (04):143-146.
1 — 50 / 1082