Search results for 'BREAST-CANCER' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Roy Gilbar & Ora Gilbar (2009). The Medical Decision-Making Process and the Family: The Case of Breast Cancer Patients and Their Husbands. Bioethics 23 (3):183-192.score: 90.0
    Objectives: The objectives of the study were (1) to assess similarities and differences between breast cancer patients and their husbands in terms of doctor-patient/spouse relationships and shared decision making; and (2) to investigate the association between breast cancer patients and husbands in terms of preference of type of doctor, doctor-patient relationship, and shared decision making regarding medical treatment. Method: Fifty-seven women with breast cancer, and their husbands, completed questionnaires measuring doctor-patient/spouse relationships (paternalism, autonomy), and decision making regarding medical treatment. Results: (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Marianne Boenink (2012). Debating the Desirability of New Biomedical Technologies: Lessons From the Introduction of Breast Cancer Screening in the Netherlands. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 20 (1):84-102.score: 90.0
    Health technology assessment (HTA) was developed in the 1970s and 1980s to facilitate decision making on the desirability of new biomedical technologies. Since then, many of the standard tools and methods of HTA have been criticized for their implicit normativity. At the same time research into the character of technology in practice has motivated philosophers, sociologists and anthropologists to criticize the traditional view of technology as a neutral instrument designed to perform a specific function. Such research suggests that the tools (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Elvin Aydin, Bahadir M. Gulluoglu & M. Kemal Kuscu (2012). A Psychoanalytic Qualitative Study of Subjective Life Experiences of Women With Breast Cancer. Journal of Research Practice 8 (2):Article - M13.score: 90.0
    This article exemplifies research on the subjective life experiences of women with breast cancer, designed from a psychoanalytic perspective. Such research aims to reveal the subjective intrapsychic processes of women suffering from breast cancer, which can provide researchers and health care professionals with useful insight. Using Biographic narrative interpretative method, the study reveals some common denominators in the subjective life experiences of women with breast cancer. The study revealed that the subjects consider the diagnosis of breast cancer as one of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Karen Bailie, Iain Dobie, Stephen Kirk & Michael Donnelly (2007). Survival After Breast Cancer Treatment: The Impact of Provider Volume. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 13 (5):749-757.score: 75.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. J. Mark Elwood (1997). Breast Cancer Screening in Younger Women: Evidence and Decision Making. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 3 (3):179-186.score: 75.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Ann Johnson & Jane Shekhdar (2005). Breast Cancer Incidence: What Do the Figures Mean? Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 11 (1):27-31.score: 75.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Mary Twomey (2012). Autonomy and Reason: Treatment Choice in Breast Cancer. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (5):1045-1050.score: 75.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Lisa Williams, Wendy Jones, Glyn Elwyn & Adrian Edwards (2008). Interactive Patient Decision Aids for Women Facing Genetic Testing for Familial Breast Cancer: A Systematic Web and Literature Review. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 14 (1):70-74.score: 75.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Jung‐Chen Chang, Tony H.‐H. Chen, Stephen W. Duffy, Amy M.‐F. Yen & Sam L.‐S. Chen (2010). Decision Modelling of Economic Evaluation of Intervention Programme of Breast Cancer. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 16 (6):1282-1288.score: 75.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Rachel Iredale, Frances Rapport, Stephanie Sivell, Wendy Jones, Adrian Edwards, Jonathon Gray & Glyn Elwyn (2008). Exploring the Requirements for a Decision Aid on Familial Breast Cancer in the UK Context: A Qualitative Study with Patients Referred to a Cancer Genetics Service. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 14 (1):110-115.score: 75.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Ann E. Johnson (1998). Problems Associated with Randomized Controlled Clinical Trials in Breast Cancer. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 4 (2):119-126.score: 75.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Ann E. Johnson (1998). Riposte to Guest Commentaries on 'Problems Associated with Randomized Controlled Clinical Trials in Breast Cancer'. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 4 (3):231-236.score: 75.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Shou‐Jen Kuo, Tony Hsiu‐Hsi Chen, Amy Ming‐Fang Yen, Dar‐Ren Chen & Li‐Sheng Chen (2010). Optimal Two‐Stage Breast Cancer Screening for Countries with Intermediate or Low Incidence of Breast Cancer. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 16 (6):1345-1352.score: 75.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Colin Luke, Grantley Gill, Stephen Birrell, Vlad Humeniuk, Martin Borg, Christos Karapetis, Bogda Koczwara, Ian Olver, Michael Penniment & Ken Pittman (2007). Treatment and Survival From Breast Cancer: The Experience of Patients at South Australian Teaching Hospitals Between 1977 and 2003. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 13 (2):212-220.score: 75.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. O. Mairik (1997). [IPPF Report International Planned Parenthood Federation December 1996. The Pill and Breast Cancer: New Information. Dialogos 30:17-8.score: 75.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. John B. McKinlay, Risa B. Burns, Richard Durante, Henry A. Feldman, Karen M. Freund, Brooke S. Harrow, Julie T. Irish, Linda E. Kasten & Mark A. Moskowitz (1997). Patient, Physician and Presentational Influences on Clinical Decision Making for Breast Cancer: Results From a Factorial Experiment. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 3 (1):23-57.score: 75.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Elaine McWhirter, Geetha Yogendran, Frances Wright, George Dranitsaris M. Pharm & Mark Clemons (2007). Baseline Radiological Staging in Primary Breast Cancer: Impact of Educational Interventions on Adherence to Published Guidelines. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 13 (4):647-650.score: 75.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Carole Scherling, Barbara Collins, Joyce MacKenzie, Catherine Bielajew & Andra Smith (2011). Pre-Chemotherapy Differences in Visuospatial Working Memory in Breast Cancer Patients Compared to Controls: An fMRI Study. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5:122-122.score: 75.0
  19. Mingji Zhang, Takahiro Higashi, Hiroshi Nishimoto, Takayuki Kinoshita & Tomotaka Sobue (2012). Concordance of Hospital‐Based Cancer Registry Data with a Clinicians' Database for Breast Cancer. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (2):459-464.score: 75.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Catherine Dekeuwer & Simone Bateman (2013). Much More Than a Gene: Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer, Reproductive Choices and Family Life. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (2):231-244.score: 72.0
    This article presents the results of a study that investigates the way in which carriers of a mutation on the BRCA1 or the BRCA2 gene, associated with a high risk of breast and ovarian cancer, make their reproductive decisions. Using semi-structured interviews, the study explored the way in which these persons reflected on the acceptability of taking the risk of transmitting this mutation to the next generation, the arguments they used in favor or against taking that risk, and in the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Jane E. Schultz (2007). Corpus Interruptus: Biotech Drugs, Insurance Providers and the Treatment of Breast Cancer. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 4 (2):103-103.score: 66.0
    In researching the biomedically-engineered drug Neulasta (filgrastim), a breast cancer patient becomes aware of the extent to which knowledge about the development and marketing of drugs influences her decisions with regard to treatment. Time spent on understanding the commercial interests of insurers and pharmaceutical companies initially thwarts but ultimately aids the healing process. This first-person narrative calls for physicians to recognize that the alignment of commercial interests transgresses the patient’s humanity.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Jenny Slatman (2012). Phenomenology of Bodily Integrity in Disfiguring Breast Cancer. Hypatia 27 (2):281-300.score: 60.0
    In this paper, I explore the meaning of bodily integrity in disfiguring breast cancer. Bodily integrity is a normative principle precisely because it does not simply refer to actual physical or functional intactness. It rather indicates what should be regarded and respected as inviolable in vulnerable and damageable bodies. I will argue that this normative inviolability or wholeness can be based upon a person's embodied experience of wholeness. This phenomenological stance differs from the liberal view that identifies respect for integrity (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Mary Twomey (2011). Relational Autonomy: An Example From Breast Cancer Nursing. Ethics and Social Welfare 5 (4):408-413.score: 60.0
    This article is an exploration of how the concept of relational autonomy might be applied in practice. The discussion uses the example of breast cancer nursing as a lens through which to consider how a view of autonomy as relational might affect the ways in which practitioners work with their clients.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Joelle M. Abi-Rached (2011). REVIEW: Robert A. Aronowitz. Unnatural History: Breast Cancer and American Society. [REVIEW] Spontaneous Generations 5 (1):79-82.score: 60.0
    “Breast cancer is all around us.” This is how Robert Aronowitz, a medical doctor, opens his timely Unnatural History: Breast Cancer and American Society. We are all familiar with the truism that “one in eight American women” will develop invasive breast cancer over the course of her lifetime. The pink ribbon has come to symbolize both solidarity and hope. Mammograms and “Self-Breast Examination” have become part of women’s daily routine, if not a spectre haunting their daily lives. Yet the evidence (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Sigrid Droste, Annegret Herrmann-Frank, Fueloep Scheibler & Tanja Krones (2011). Ethical Issues in Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation (ASCT) in Advanced Breast Cancer: A Systematic Literature Review. [REVIEW] BMC Medical Ethics 12 (1):6-.score: 60.0
    Background: An effectiveness assessment on ASCT in locally advanced and metastatic breast cancer identified serious ethical issues associated with this intervention. Our objective was to systematically review these aspects by means of a literature analysis. Methods: We chose the reflexive Socratic approach as the review method using Hofmann's question list, conducted a comprehensive literature search in biomedical, psychological and ethics bibliographic databases and screened the resulting hits in a 2-step selection process. Relevant arguments were assembled from the included articles, and (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Megan Eide & Ann Milliken Pederson (2009). God, Disease, and Spiritual Dilemmas: Reading the Lives of Women with Breast Cancer. Zygon 44 (1):85-96.score: 60.0
    To write about the disease of breast cancer from both scientific and spiritual perspectives is to reflect upon our genetic and spiritual ancestry. We examine the issues involved in breast cancer at the intersections of spirituality, technology, and science, using the fundamental thing we know about being human: our bodies. Our goal in this essay is to offer close readings of women's spiritual and bodily journeys through the disease of breast cancer. We have discovered that both illness and health come (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Jon Williamson (2006). Combining Argumentation and Bayesian Nets for Breast Cancer Prognosis. Journal of Logic, Language and Information 15 (1-2):155-178.score: 60.0
    We present a new framework for combining logic with probability, and demonstrate the application of this framework to breast cancer prognosis. Background knowledge concerning breast cancer prognosis is represented using logical arguments. This background knowledge and a database are used to build a Bayesian net that captures the probabilistic relationships amongst the variables. Causal hypotheses gleaned from the Bayesian net in turn generate new arguments. The Bayesian net can be queried to help decide when one argument attacks another. The Bayesian (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Ozum Ucok (2005). The Meaning of Appearance in Surviving Breast Cancer. Human Studies 28 (3):291 - 316.score: 60.0
    In line with some recent studies that emphasize the importance of embodied meanings in social interaction and face-to-face communication, this study recognizes the significance of the body in human meaning-making processes and contributes to the emerging studies that explore the relation of the body, self, and social interaction. Unlike studies that analyze the body as a symbol or text disconnected from the actual body (i.e., a representation), this study does not separate appearance from the body. Rather, this research explores embodied (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Lisa S. Parker (1995). Breast Cancer Genetic Screening and Critical Bioethics' Gaze. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 20 (3):313-337.score: 60.0
    This paper illustrates a role that bioethics should play in developing and criticizing protocols for breast cancer genetic screening. It demonstrates how a critical bioethics, using approaches and reflecting concerns of contemporary philosophy of science and science studies, may critically interrogate the normative and conceptual schemes within which ethical considerations about such screening protocols are framed. By exploring various factors that influence the development of such protocols, including politics, cultural norms, and conceptions of disease, this paper and the critical bioethics' (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Don Marquis (1989). An Ethical Problem Concerning Recent Therapeutic Research on Breast Cancer. Hypatia 4 (2):140 - 155.score: 60.0
    The surgical treatment of breast cancer has changed in recent years. Analysis of the research that led to these changes yields apparently good arguments for all of the following: (1) The research yielded very great benefits for women. (2) There was no other way of obtaining these benefits. (3) This research violated the fundamental rights of the women who were research subjects. This sets a problem for ethics at many levels.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Myriam Skrutkowska & Charles Weijer, Do Patients with Breast Cancer Participating in Clinical Trials Receive Better Nursing Care?score: 60.0
    PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: To examine differences in nursing care received by patients with breast cancer enrolled in clinical trials and those not enrolled in clinical trials. DESIGN: Retrospective review of clinic charts. SETTING: Oncology outpatient department of a tertiary-care hospital. SAMPLE: 90 women with early stage breast cancer. The mean age of the women was 53 years. More than half of the women (51 of 90) were treated in a clinical trial. METHODS: Retrospective chart review of all the nurse-patient clinic encounters for (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. N. Press, J. R. Fishman & B. A. Koenig (2000). Collective Fear, Individualized Risk: The Social and Cultural Context of Genetic Testing for Breast Cancer. Nursing Ethics 7 (3):237-249.score: 60.0
    The purpose of this article is to provide a critical examination of two aspects of culture and biomedicine that have helped to shape the meaning and practice of genetic testing for breast cancer. These are: (1) the cultural construction of fear of breast cancer, which has been fuelled in part by (2) the predominance of a ‘risk’ paradigm in contemporary biomedicine. The increasing elaboration and delineation of risk factors and risk numbers are in part intended to help women to contend (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Leslie E. Blumenson (1987). How Would a Latent Period for Early Breast Cancer Affect the Benefit of Screening? Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 2 (2):169-182.score: 60.0
    The ideal goal of a screening program for breast cancer is to detect the disease at a stage when it is still curable by a simple lumpectomy. This goal would be possible if the tumor had an early latent period before it was vascularized. However, even if there existed a harmless screening examination that was sensitive enough to discover the cancer at this stage the benefit to be gained from a screening program would be highly dependent on the time the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Matt Williams & Jon Williamson (2006). Combining Argumentation and Bayesian Nets for Breast Cancer Prognosis. Journal of Logic, Language and Information 15 (1-2):155-178.score: 60.0
    We present a new framework for combining logic with probability, and demonstrate the application of this framework to breast cancer prognosis. Background knowledge concerning breast cancer prognosis is represented using logical arguments. This background knowledge and a database are used to build a Bayesian net that captures the probabilistic relationships amongst the variables. Causal hypotheses gleaned from the Bayesian net in turn generate new arguments. The Bayesian net can be queried to help decide when one argument attacks another. The Bayesian (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Cynthia Ryan (2004). “Am I Not a Woman?” The Rhetoric of Breast Cancer Stories in African American Women's Popular Periodicals. Journal of Medical Humanities 25 (2):129-150.score: 60.0
    Representations of breast cancer are examined in three popular women's periodicals targeting African American readers: Ebony, Essence, and Black Elegance. The researcher focuses specifically on representations that reflect certain ideas/ideals about the sharing and creating of information about the disease and related issues, such as health care and body image. Magazine selections are analyzed and critiqued according to the epistemological principles outlined by Patricia Hill Collins in Black Feminist Thought. The author calls for further research into how and why particular (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Anne Hubbell, Lisa Murray, Wen-Ying Liu & Kim Witte (2001). Looking Toward the Future of Clinical Trials: The Application of Communication Variables to the Recruitment of Women Into Breast Cancer Clinical Trials. World Futures 57 (6):599-613.score: 60.0
    (2001). Looking toward the future of clinical trials: The application of communication variables to the recruitment of women into breast cancer clinical trials. World Futures: Vol. 57, Future Trends in Communications Strategies, pp. 599-613.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Tarja Suominen, Helena Leino-Kilpi & Pekka Laippala (1994). Breast Cancer Patients' Perceived Participation in Health Care: How Do Patients Themselves and Nurses Assess This Participation? Nursing Ethics 1 (2):96-109.score: 60.0
    The purpose of this study was to compare breast cancer patients' perceived partici pation in their own care with nurses' perceptions of such participation. Both groups reported that patients are able and willing to take part in their own care more actively than allowed under the present health care system. Nurses also reported that they do provide patients with opportunities for participation.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Kathryn Coe & Lyle B. Steadman (1995). The Human Breast and the Ancestral Reproductive Cycle. Human Nature 6 (3):197-220.score: 54.0
    This paper, using modern Darwinian theory, proposes an explanation for the increasingly high incidence of breast cancer found among pre-and post-menopausal women living today in westernized countries. A number of factors have been said to be responsible: genetic inheritance (BRCA-1), diet (specifically the increased consumption of dietary fat), exposure to carcinogenic agents, lifetime menstrual activity, and reproductive factors. The primary aim of this paper is to demonstrate the value of a perspective based on Darwinian theory. In this paper, Darwinian theory (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Massimiliano Bonafè, Gianluca Storci & Claudio Franceschi (2012). Inflamm‐Aging of the Stem Cell Niche: Breast Cancer as a Paradigmatic Example. Bioessays 34 (1):40-49.score: 51.0
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Min Soon Kim, William N. Rodney, Gregory P. Reece, Elisabeth K. Beahm, Melissa A. Crosby & Mia K. Markey (2011). Quantifying the Aesthetic Outcomes of Breast Cancer Treatment: Assessment of Surgical Scars From Clinical Photographs. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 17 (6):1075-1082.score: 51.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Min Soon Kim, William N. Rodney, Tara Cooper, Chris Kite, Gregory P. Reece & Mia K. Markey (2009). Towards Quantifying the Aesthetic Outcomes of Breast Cancer Treatment: Comparison of Clinical Photography and Colorimetry. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 15 (1):20-31.score: 51.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Luiz Claudio Santos Thuler & Hilda Guimaraes Freitas (2008). Evaluation of a Community‐Based Intervention to Enhance Breast Cancer Screening Practices in Brazil. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 14 (6):1012-1017.score: 51.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Sylvia Nagl, Objective Bayesian Nets for Systems Modelling and Prognosis in Breast Cancer.score: 48.0
    Cancer treatment decisions should be based on all available evidence. But this evidence is complex and varied: it includes not only the patient’s symptoms and expert knowledge of the relevant causal processes, but also clinical databases relating to past patients, databases of observations made at the molecular level, and evidence encapsulated in scientific papers and medical informatics systems. Objective Bayesian nets offer a principled path to knowledge integration, and we show in this chapter how they can be applied to integrate (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Jon Williamson, Objective Bayesian Nets for Systems Modelling and Prognosis in Breast Cancer.score: 48.0
    Cancer treatment decisions should be based on all available evidence. But this evidence is complex and varied: it includes not only the patient’s symptoms and expert knowledge of the relevant causal processes, but also clinical databases relating to past patients, databases of observations made at the molecular level, and evidence encapsulated in scientific papers and medical informatics systems. Objective Bayesian nets offer a principled path to knowledge integration, and we show in this chapter how they can be applied to integrate (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Maya J. Goldenberg (2010). Working for the Cure: Challenging Pink Ribbon Activism [Book Chapter]. In Roma Harris, Nadine Wathen & Sally Wyatt (eds.), [Book] Configuring Health Consumers: Health Work and the Imperative of Personal Responsibility. Eds. R. Harris, N. Wathen, S. Wyatt. Amsterdam: Palgrave Macmillan, 2010. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 45.0
    In accordance with the critical women’s health literature recounting the ways that women are encouraged to submit themselves to various sorts of health “imperatives”, I investigate the messages tacitly conveyed to women in “campaigns for the cure” and breast cancer awareness efforts, which, I argue, overemphasizes a “positive attitude”, healthy lifestyle, and cure rather than prevention of this life-threatening disease. I challenge that the message of hope pervading breast cancer discourse silences the despair felt by many women, furthers a tacit (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Blase N. Polite & Olufunmilayo I. Olopade (2005). Breast Cancer and Race: A Rising Tide Does Not Lift All Boats Equally. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 48 (1):166-S175.score: 45.0
  47. L. Rosenblatt (2006). Being the Monster: Women's Narratives of Body and Self After Treatment for Breast Cancer. Medical Humanities 32 (1):53-56.score: 45.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Simone van der Burg (2009). Imagining the Future of Photoacoustic Mammography. Science and Engineering Ethics 15 (1):97-110.score: 45.0
    How can a realistic ethical imagination about the future of a technology take shape? This article contains a reflection which is based on the experiences of an embedded ethicist in the context of biophysical research conducive to the development of photoacoustic mammography, which is intended for the non-invasive detection of breast cancer. Imagination in this context already informs the activities of the biophysical researchers, but its role is limited: biophysical future scenarios concentrate on the technological advances that photoacoustics could bring (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Peter J. Schulz & Bert Meuffels (2012). It is About Our Body, Our Own Body!”: On the Difficulty of Telling Dutch Women Under 50 That Mammography is Not for Them. Journal of Argumentation in Context 1 (1):130-142.score: 45.0
    This article is concerned with the reasons why sometimes good arguments in health communication leaflets fail to convince the targeted audience. As an illustrative example it uses the age-dependent eligibility of women in the Netherlands to receive routine breast cancer screening examinations: according to Dutch regulations women under 50 are ineligible for them. The present qualitative study rests on and complements three experimental studies on the persuasiveness of mammography information leaflets; it uses interviews to elucidate reasons why the arguments in (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Charles Weijer, The Breast Cancer Research Scandal: Addressing the Issues.score: 45.0
    The three claims put forward by Dr. Roger Poisson to rationalize his enrollment of ineligible subjects in clinical trials do not justify research fraud. None the less, certain lessons for the conduct of clinical research can be learned from the affair: experimental therapies should be made available to technically ineligible subjects when no effective therapy exists for their disease; further research must investigate the possible benefits of clinical-trial participation; broadly based, pragmatic trials must be regarded as the ideal model; and (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000