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Medical Ethics, Misc

Edited by Ruchika Mishra (Program in Medicine and Human Values, California Pacific Medical Center)
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  1. Henry Abramovitch & Eliezer Schwartz (1996). Three Stages of Medical Dialogue. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 17 (2).
    The negative consequences of physicians' failure to establish and maintain personal relationships with patients are at the heart of the humanistic crisis in medicine. To resolve this crisis, a new model of doctor-patient interaction is proposed, based on the ideas of Martin Buber's philosophy of dialogue. This model shows how the physican may successfully combine the personal (I-Thou) and impersonal (I-It) aspects of medicine in three stages. These Three Stages of Medical Dialogue include:1. An Initial Personal Meeting stage, which initiates (...)
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  2. Terrence F. Ackerman (1989). A Casebook of Medical Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    Should a brain-dead woman be artificially maintained for the sake of her fetus? Does a physician have the right to administer a life-saving transfusion despite the patient's religious beliefs? Can a family request a hysterectomy for their retarded daughter? Physicians are facing moral dilemmas with increasing frequency. But how should these delicate questions be resolved and by whom? A Casebook of Medical Ethics offers a real-life view of the central issue involved in clinical medical ethics. Since the analysis of cases (...)
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  3. George J. Agich (1981). The Foundation of Medical Ethics. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 2 (1):31-34.
    Thomasma and Pellegrino''s [3] focus on the healing relationship as the way to give medical ethics a philosophical foundation contains a number of difficulties. Most importantly, their approach focuses philosophical analysis on an idealized view of the healing relationship in which the ideal of health is seen as an uncontroversial norm in the individual case. medical ethics is then characterized as an intrinsic part of the medical act itself. Philosophical inquiry seems limited to a description of the practice of medicine (...)
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  4. Judith C. Ahronheim, Jonathan Moreno, Connie Zuckerman & Laurence B. McCullough (1995). Ethics in Clinical Practice. HEC Forum 7 (6):377-378.
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  5. Timo Airaksinen & Manu J. Vuorio (1988). Medical Ethics in Finland: Some Recent Trends. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 9 (3).
    This paper reviews the research done in Finland on medical ethics in the last three years and published in four leading journals. The general characteristics of this area are discussed and some comments on its most conspicuous representatives are offered. The conclusion reached is that medical ethics in Finland is still in a rather embryonic stage of development, and that more systematic and theoretically sophisticated approaches are required. However, since many physicians have become interested in ethical questions, it can be (...)
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  6. Darrel W. Amundsen (1996). Medicine, Society, and Faith in the Ancient and Medieval Worlds. Johns Hopkins University Press.
    In Medicine, Society, and Faith in the Ancient and Medieval Worlds Darrel Amundsen explores the disputed boundaries of medicine and Christianity by focusing on the principle of the sanctity of human life, including the duty to treat or attempt to sustain the life of the ill. As he examines his themes and moves from text to context, Amundsen clarifies a number of Christian principles in relation to bioethical issues that are hotly debated today. In his examination of the moral stance (...)
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  7. Gary R. Anderson & Valerie A. Glesnes-Anderson (eds.) (1987). Health Care Ethics: A Guide for Decision Makers. Aspen Publishers.
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  8. Judith Andre (1999). The Alleged Incompatibility of Business and Medical Ethics. HEC Forum 11 (4):288-292.
    Business Ethics and medical ethics are in principle compatible: In particular, the tools of business ethics can be useful to those doing healthcare ethics. Health care could be conducted as a business and maintain its moral core.
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  9. Jonny Anomaly (2014). What's Wrong with Factory Farming? Public Health Ethics 7:phu001.
    Factory farming continues to grow around the world as a low cost way of producing animal products for human consumption. But many of the practices associated with intensive animal farming have been criticized by public health professionals and animal welfare advocates. The aim of this essay is to raise three independent moral concerns with factory farming, and to explain why these practices flourish despite the cruelty inflicted on animals and the public health risks imposed on people. I conclude that the (...)
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  10. Thalia Arawi & Philip Rosoff (2012). Competing Duties. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 9 (2):135-147.
    Over the last 80 years, a major goal of medical educators has been to improve the quality of applicants to medical school and, hence, the resulting doctors. To do this, academic standards have been progressively strengthened. The Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) in the United States and the undergraduate science grade point average (GPA) have long been correlated with success in medical school, and graduation rates have been close to 100 percent for many years. Recent studies have noted that some (...)
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  11. Robert M. Arnold & Lachlan Forrow (1993). Empirical Research in Medical Ethics: An Introduction. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 14 (3):195-196.
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  12. John Arras & Robert Hunt (eds.) (1983). Ethical Issues in Modern Medicine. Mayfield Pub. Co..
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  13. Richard E. Ashcroft (ed.) (2007). Principles of Health Care Ethics. John Wiley & Sons.
    Edited by four leading members of the new generation of medical and healthcare ethicists working in the UK, respected worldwide for their work in medical ethics, Principles of Health Care Ethics, Second Edition_is a standard resource for students, professionals, and academics wishing to understand current and future issues in healthcare ethics. With a distinguished international panel of contributors working at the leading edge of academia, this volume presents a comprehensive guide to the field, with state of the art introductions to (...)
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  14. Benedict M. Ashley (1997). Health Care Ethics: A Theological Analysis. Georgetown University Press.
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  15. Benedict M. Ashley (1994). Ethics of Health Care: An Introductory Textbook. Georgetown University Press.
    Contending that concern over the ethical dimensions of these and other like issues are no longer just in the domain of those involved in medical practice, the ...
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  16. Nafsika Athanassoulis (2007). Training Good Professionals. In Richard E. Ashcroft (ed.), Principles of Health Care Ethics.
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  17. John Atkinson (1976). Doctors' Dilemmas: A Discussion of Medical Ethics. Epworth Press.
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  18. Derrick K. S. Au (1999). Constructing Options for Health Care Reform in Hong Kong. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 24 (6):607 – 623.
    The Harvard Report, published in April 1999 for public consultation in Hong Kong, proposed a fundamental restructuring in its health care delivery and financing systems. The Report claims to be evidence-based in its approach (Hsiao et al., 1999a). While 'evidence' has been widely collected by the consultancy team through surveys, consultations and focus groups, the recommendations put forth are not value-free. They carry clear ideological preferences. The value assumptions and ethical presuppositions underlying the report are discussed in this paper. The (...)
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  19. Mark P. Aulisio, Robert M. Arnold & Stuart J. Youngner (eds.) (2003). Ethics Consultation: From Theory to Practice. Johns Hopkins University Press.
    In the clinical setting, questions of medical ethics raise a host of perplexing problems, often complicated by conflicting perspectives and the need to make immediate decisions. In this volume, bioethicists and physicians provide a nuanced, in-depth approach to the difficult issues involved in bioethics consultation. Addressing the needs of researchers, clinicians, and other health professionals on the front lines of bioethics practice, the contributors focus primarily on practical concerns -- whether ethics consultation is best done by individuals, teams, or committees (...)
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  20. Norman Autton (1984). Doctors Talking: A Guide to Current Medico-Moral Problems. Mowbray.
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  21. Robert Baker (ed.) (1999). The American Medical Ethics Revolution: How the Ama's Code of Ethics has Transformed Physicians' Relationships to Patients, Professionals, and Society. Johns Hopkins University Press.
    The American Medical Association enacted its Code of Ethics in 1847, the first such national codification. In this volume, a distinguished group of experts from the fields of medicine, bioethics, and history of medicine reflect on the development of medical ethics in the United States, using historical analyses as a springboard for discussions of the problems of the present, including what the editors call "a sense of moral crisis precipitated by the shift from a system of fee-for-service medicine to a (...)
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  22. Robert Baker & Laurence B. McCullough (eds.) (2009). The Cambridge World History of Medical Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
    The Cambridge World History of Medical Ethics is the first comprehensive scholarly account of the global history of medical ethics. Offering original interpretations of the field by leading bioethicists and historians of medicine, it will serve as the essential point of departure for future scholarship in the field. The volumes reconceptualize the history of medical ethics through the creation of new categories, including the life cycle; discourses of religion, philosophy, and bioethics; and the relationship between medical ethics and the state, (...)
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  23. Robert Baker & Laurence B. McCullough (2007). Medical Ethics' Appropriation of Moral Philosophy: The Case of the Sympathetic and the Unsympathetic Physician. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 17 (1):3-22.
    Philosophy textbooks typically treat bioethics as a form of "applied ethics"-i.e., an attempt to apply a moral theory, like utilitarianism, to controversial ethical issues in biology and medicine. Historians, however, can find virtually no cases in which applied philosophical moral theory influenced ethical practice in biology or medicine. In light of the absence of historical evidence, the authors of this paper advance an alternative model of the historical relationship between philosophical ethics and medical ethics, the appropriation model. They offer two (...)
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  24. Robert Baker & Laurence B. McCullough (2007). The Relationship Between Moral Philosophy and Medical Ethics Reconsidered. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 17 (3):271-276.
    : Medical ethics often is treated as applied ethics, that is, the application of moral philosophy to ethical issues in medicine. In an earlier paper, we examined instances of moral philosophy's influence on medical ethics. We found the applied ethics model inadequate and sketched an alternative model. On this model, practitioners seeking to change morality "appropriate" concepts and theory fragments from moral philosophy to valorize and justify their innovations. Goldilocks-like, five commentators tasted our offerings. Some found them too cold, since (...)
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  25. Bertram Bandman (2003). The Moral Development of Health Care Professionals: Rational Decisionmaking in Health Care Ethics. Praeger.
    A central challenge motivates this work: How, if at all, can philosophical ethics help in the moral development of health professionals?
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  26. Zbigniew Bańkowski & J. Corvera Bernardelli (eds.) (1981). Medical Ethics and Medical Education: Proceedings of the Xivth Round Table Conference, Mexico City, Mexico, 1-3 December 1980. [REVIEW] Who Publications Centre [Distributor].
  27. Bernard Barber (ed.) (1978). Medical Ethics and Social Change. American Academy of Political and Social Science.
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  28. Samuel Bard (1769/1996). A Discourse Upon the Duties of a Physician: With Some Sentiments, on the Usefulness and Necessity of a Public Hospital: Delivered Before the President and Governors of King' College, Held on the 16th of May 1769: As Advice to Those Gentlemen Who Then Received the First Medical Degrees Conferred by That University. [REVIEW] Applewood Books.
    This classic essay on the responsibilities of a doctor was first published in New York in 1769. It remains a perfect gift for a young doctor just starting out or for one who is older and wiser. This classic will be an inspiration to any who read its timeless message.
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  29. Robert Laurence Barry (2002). The Sanctity of Human Life and its Protection. University Press of America.
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  30. Yohanna Barth-Rogers & Alan Jotkowitz (2009). Executive Autonomy, Multiculturalism and Traditional Medical Ethics. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (2):39 – 40.
  31. Robert Bass, Quotidian Medical Epistemology.
    My title may suggest that I will address the activities of medical professionals as they go about their daily business of diagnosis, prescription and treatment. Certainly, that deserves attention, but it is not my target here. My concern is, on the one hand, with typical consumers of health and medical information, and, on the other, with the problems such consumers face in understanding, interpreting and applying the information available to them.
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  32. Tom L. Beauchamp (2009). Principles of Biomedical Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    This edition represents a thorough-going revision of what has become a classic text in biomedical ethics. Major structural changes mark the revision. The authors have added a new concluding chapter on methods that, along with its companion chapter on moral theory, emphasizes convergence across theories, coherence in moral justification, and the common morality. They have simplified the opening chapter on moral norms which introduces the framework of prima facie moral principles and ways to specify and balance them. Together with the (...)
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  33. Tom L. Beauchamp (1994). Principles of Biomedical Ethics / Tom L. Beauchamp, James F. Childress. Oxford University Press.
    This is an extremely thorough revision of the leading textbook of bioethics. The authors have made many improvements in style, organization, argument and content. These changes reflect advances in the bioethics literature over the past five years. The most dramatic expansions of the text are in the comprehensiveness with which the authors treat different currents in ethical theory and the greater breadth and depth of their discussion of public policy and public health issues. In every chapter, readers will find new (...)
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  34. Hassan Bella (2008). Islamic Medical Ethics: What and How to Teach. In Jonathan E. Brockopp & Thomas Eich (eds.), Muslim Medical Ethics: From Theory to Practice. University of South Carolina Press.
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  35. Piers Benn (2005). The Role of Conscience in Medical Ethics. In Nafsika Athanassoulis (ed.), Philosophical Reflections on Medical Ethics. Palgrave Macmillan.
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  36. Eric B. Beresford (1996). Can Phronesis Save the Life of Medical Ethics? Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 17 (3).
    There has been a growing interest in casuistry since the ground breaking work of Jonsen and Toulmin. Casuistry, in their view, offers the possibility of securing the moral agreement that policy makers desire but which has proved elusive to theory driven approaches to ethics. However, their account of casuistry is dependent upon the exercise of phronesis. As recent discussions of phronesis make clear, this requires attention not only to the particulars of the case, but also to the substantive goods at (...)
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  37. Catherine Anne Berglund (2004). Ethics for Health Care. Oxford University Press.
    Ethics for Health Care, 2E takes a novel approach to learning about and understanding ethics. It draws on practical experiences and contemporary issues in its exploration of the ethical choices made in health care. The common theme followed in the book is that health care ethics are not only about setting acceptable standards, they are also about reflecting on what health care professionals should aim towards. It is about reflecting on optimal standards, and pursuing those standards. In focusing on the (...)
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  38. Laura Bishop (2002). Michael Parker and Donna Dickenson, the Cambridge Medical Ethics Workbook: Case Studies, Commentaries, and Activities. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 23 (2):175-181.
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  39. Brian Peter Bliss (1975). Aims and Motives in Clinical Medicine: A Practical Approach to Medical Ethics. Pitman Medical.
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  40. J. S. Blumenthal-Barby (2012). Between Reason and Coercion: Ethically Permissible Influence in Health Care and Health Policy Contexts. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 22 (4):345-366.
    In bioethics, the predominant categorization of various types of influence has been a tripartite classification of rational persuasion (meaning influence by reason and argument), coercion (meaning influence by irresistible threats—or on a few accounts, offers), and manipulation (meaning everything in between). The standard ethical analysis in bioethics has been that rational persuasion is always permissible, and coercion is almost always impermissible save a few cases such as imminent threat to self or others. However, many forms of influence fall into the (...)
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  41. J. S. Blumenthal-Barby (2012). Seeking Better Health Care Outcomes: The Ethics of Using the “Nudge”. American Journal of Bioethics 12 (2):1-10.
    Policymakers, employers, insurance companies, researchers, and health care providers have developed an increasing interest in using principles from behavioral economics and psychology to persuade people to change their health-related behaviors, lifestyles, and habits. In this article, we examine how principles from behavioral economics and psychology are being used to nudge people (the public, patients, or health care providers) toward particular decisions or behaviors related to health or health care, and we identify the ethically relevant dimensions that should be considered for (...)
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  42. J. S. Blumenthal-Barby (2011). On the Concept and Measure of Voluntariness: Insights From Behavioral Economics and Cognitive Science. American Journal of Bioethics 11 (8):25-26.
    In their article “The Concept of Voluntary Consent,” Robert Nelson and colleagues (2011) argue for two necessary and jointly sufficient conditions for voluntary action: intentionality, and substantial freedom from controlling influences. They propose an instrument to empirically measure voluntariness, the Decision Making Control Instrument. I argue that (1) their conceptual analysis of intentionality and controlling influences needs expansion in light of the growing use of behavioral economics principles to change individual and public health behaviors (growing in part by the designation (...)
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  43. Jenifer Booth (2013). Towards a Pre-Modern Psychaitry. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Responding to the work of previous critics of psychiatry, who have associated its undue dominance with both a modern scientific paradigm and political factors, I put forward a theoretical challenge based on MacIntyre`s work on Aquinas and Aristotle, but adding the museum and assembly as conceptual thinking tools. -/- MacIntyre`s work on practices, tradition-constituted enquiry, Marxist ideology and Kuhn are all used in putting forward a pre-modern view of knowledge. The feminist philosophy of Luce Irigaray widens the project to include (...)
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  44. James Bopp (ed.) (1985). Human Life and Health Care Ethics. University Publications of America.
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  45. Michael Boylan (ed.) (2000). Medical Ethics. Prentice Hall.
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  46. Jonathan E. Brockopp & Thomas Eich (eds.) (2008). Muslim Medical Ethics: From Theory to Practice. University of South Carolina Press.
    Muslim Medical Ethics draws on the work of historians, health-care professionals, theologians, and social scientists to produce an interdisciplinary view of ...
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  47. Thom Brooks (2012). Preserving Capabilities. American Journal of Bioethics 12 (6):48-49.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 6, Page 48-49, June 2012.
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  48. Chip Brown (1998). Afterwards, You're a Genius: Faith, Medicine, and the Metaphysics of Healing. Riverhead Books.
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  49. Jacob Busch & Rafaele Rodogno (forthcoming). A New Perspective on Shaw’s New Perspective. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  50. Nina di Pietro, Louise Whiteley & Judy Illes (2012). Treatments and Services for Neurodevelopmental Disorders on Advocacy Websites: Information or Evaluation? [REVIEW] Neuroethics 5 (2):197-209.
    The Internet has quickly gained popularity as a major source of health-related information, but its impact is unclear. Here, we investigate the extent to which advocacy websites for three neurodevelopmental disorders—cerebral palsy (CP), autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD)—inform stakeholders about treatment options, and discuss the ethical challenges inherent in providing such information online. We identified major advocacy websites for each disorder and assessed website accountability, the number, attributes, and accessibility of treatments described, and the valence (...)
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