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  1. Douglas Hanes & Gin McCollum (2003). Dimensionality and Explanatory Power of Reading Models. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (4):486-487.
    The authors' review of alternative models for reading is of great value in identifying issues and progress in the field. More emphasis should be given to distinguishing between models that offer an explanation for behavior and those that merely simulate experimental data. An analysis of a model's discrete structure can allow for comparisons of models based upon their inherent dimensionality and explanatory power.
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  2. Gin McCollum (2002). Systems of Logical Systems: Neuroscience and Quantum Logic. [REVIEW] Foundations of Science 7 (1-2):49-72.
    Nervous systems are intricately organized on many levels of analysis.The intricate organization invites the development of mathematicalsystems that reflect its logical structure. Particular logical structures and choices of invariants within those structures narrowthe ranges of perceptions that are possible and sensorimotorcoordination that may be selected. As in quantum logic, choicesaffect outcomes.Some of the mathematical tools in use in quantum logic havealready also been used in neurobiology, including the mathematicsof ordered structures and a product like a tensor product. Astheoretical neurobiology is (...)
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  3. Gin McCollum (2001). Navigating the Complex Dynamics of Memory and Desire: Mathematics Accommodates Continuous and Conditional Dynamics. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (1):51-53.
    The mathematical approach to such essentially biological phenomena as perseverative reaching is most welcome. To extend these results and make them more accurate, levels of analysis and neural centers should he distinguished. The navigational nature of sensorimotor control should be characterized more clearly, including the continuous dynamics of neural processes hut not limited to it. In particular, discrete conditions should be formalized mathematically as part of the biological process.
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  4. Gin McCollum (1997). Glossing Over Too Much. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (4):692-692.
    Although Phillips & Singer's proposal of commonalities seems sound, information theory and artificial neural network modeling omit important detail. An example is given of a distributed neural transformation that has been characterized mathematically and found to have both overall commonalities and differences of detail in different regions. P&S's contextual field is compared to inclusive regions in a formalism relevant for modeling bodily-kinaesthetic intelligence.
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  5. Gin McCollum (1997). More Mathematics: Bodily-Kinaesthetic Intelligence. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (4):572-572.
    Although the idea that cognitive structure changes as we learn is welcome, a variety of mathematical structures are needed to model the neural and cognitive processes involved. A specific example of bodily-kinaesthetic intelligence is given, building on a formalism given elsewhere. As the structure of cognition changes, previous learning can become tacit, adding to the complexity of cognition and its modeling.
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  6. Gin McCollum (1997). More Precise Beam Logic Implied by Cerebellar–Motor Coherence. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (2):255-256.
    Just as physics determines physically viable movements, the spatial distribution of input excitations allows the cerebellum to choose physiologically viable beams. Cerebellar–motor coherence implies that the ordering and modes of combination of cerebellar beams reflect (1) the way movement invariants are ordered and combined in movement and (2) the way physical principles are integrated in learning to move.
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  7. Patrick D. Roberts, Gin McCollum & Jan E. Holly (1996). Cerebellar Rhythms: Exploring Another Metaphor. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (3):471-472.
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  8. Gin McCollum (1992). Invariants of the Second Transformation Expressed in Activation Ranges. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (2):346-348.
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  9. Lewis M. Nashner & Gin McCollum (1985). Elements of a Sensorimotor Theory Compatible with Experiments. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (1):167.
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  10. Lewis M. Nashner & Gin McCollum (1985). The Organization of Human Postural Movements: A Formal Basis and Experimental Synthesis. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (1):135-150.
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  11. Gin McCollum (1978). Spacetime Code: Preliminaries and Motivations. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 8 (3-4):211-228.
    A review of the work of David Finkelstein and others on quantum topology is given, the intention being to present physical ideas and a progress report, which will help readers with the more detailed papers. Some new approaches involving walks on graphs are presented.
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