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  1. Richard Seaford (forthcoming). The Dionysiac Don Responds to Don Quixote: Rainer Friedrich on the New Ritualism. Arion 8 (2).
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  2. Richard Seaford (2012). Monetisation and the Genesis of the Western Subject. Historical Materialism 20 (1):78-102.
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  3. Richard Seaford (2008). The Derveni Papyrus. Ancient Philosophy 26 (2):395 - 398.
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  4. Richard Seaford (2006). Cole (S.G.) Landscapes, Gender, and Ritual Space: The Ancient Greek Experience. Pp. Xviii + 292, Maps. Berkeley, Los Angeles and London: University of California Press, 2004. Cased, £29.95, US$45. ISBN: 0-520-23544-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 56 (02):498-.
  5. Richard Seaford (2006). The Derveni Papyrus: Cosmology, Theology and Interpretation, by Gábor Betegh. [REVIEW] Ancient Philosophy 26 (2):395-398.
  6. Richard Seaford (2005). Mystic Light in Aeschylus' Bassarai. Classical Quarterly 55 (02):602-606.
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  7. Richard Seaford (2004). Money and the Early Greek Mind: Homer, Philosophy, Tragedy. Cambridge University Press.
    How were the Greeks of the sixth century BC able to invent philosophy and tragedy? Richard Seaford argues that a large part of the answer can be found in another momentous development, the invention and rapid spread of coinage. By transforming social relations, monetization contributed to the concepts of the universe as an impersonal system (fundamental to Presocratic philosophy) and of the individual alienated from his own kin and from the gods, as found in tragedy.
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  8. Richard Seaford (2003). Aeschylus and the Unity of Opposites. Journal of Hellenic Studies 123:141-163.
    The idea of the 'unity of opposites' allows one to see important connections between phenomena normally treated separately: verbal style, ritual, tragic action and cosmology. The stylistic figure of Satzparallelismus in lamentation and mystic ritual expresses the unity of opposites (particularly of life and death) as oxymora. Both rituals were factors in the genesis of tragedy, and continued to influence the style and action of mature tragedy. The author advances new readings of various passages of the Oresteia, which is seen (...)
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  9. Richard Seaford (2003). Tragic Voices N. Loraux: The Mourning Voice. An Essay on Greek Tragedy. Translated by Elizabeth Trapnell Rawlings with a Foreword by Pietro Pucci . (Cornell Studies in Classical Philology 58.) Pp. XV + 127. Ithaca and London: Cornell University Press, 2002 (Original French Edition 1999). Cased, £23.50. Isbn: 0-8014-3830-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 53 (02):281-.
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  10. Richard Seaford (2002). K. Derderian: Leaving Words to Remember. Greek Mourning and the Advent of Literacy . Pp. Vi + 206. Leiden, Boston, and Cologne: Brill, 2001. Cased, $95. ISBN: 90-04-11750-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 52 (02):367-.
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  11. Richard Seaford (2002). Reading Money: Leslie Kurke on the Politics of Meaning in Archaic Greece. Arion 9:145-65.
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  12. Richard Seaford (2001). S. D. Sullivan: Euripides' Use of Psychological Terminology . Pp. Xii + 234. Montreal, Kingston, London, and Ithaca: McGill-Queen's University Press, 2000. Cased, £43. ISBN: 0-7735-2051-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 51 (02):379-.
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  13. Richard Seaford (2001). S. Gödde, T. Heinze (edd.): Skenika. Beiträge zum antiken Theater und seiner Rezeption. Festschrift zum 65. Geburtstag von Horst-Dieter Blume . Pp. xiii + 462, ills, 8 pls. Darmstadt: Wissenschaftliche Buchgesellschaft, 2000. Paper, DM 78. ISBN: 3-534-15038-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 51 (02):410-.
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  14. Richard Seaford (2000). The Social Function of Attic Tragedy: A Response to Jasper Griffin. Classical Quarterly 50 (01):30-.
    Jasper Griffin's polemic, in this journal, against what he calls the ‘collectivist school’ of interpretation of Athenian tragedy is welcome, as it encourages clarification of fundamental differences. I do not have the space here to tackle him wherever I think he is wrong, still less construct an argument to the effect that Athenian tragedy was a ‘collective’ phenomenon. Rather I want to do two things. Firstly, the casual reader may have formed the impression that whereas the ‘collectivists’ operate with vague (...)
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  15. Richard Seaford (1999). G. Zanetto (Ed., Trans): Euripide . Ciclope, Reso. Pp. Xxxi + 159. Milan: Arnoldo Mondadori, 1998. Paper, L. 12,000. ISBN: 88-04-43177-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 49 (02):561-.
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  16. Richard Seaford (1999). The Tragic Exchange V. Wohl: Intimate Commerce. Exchange, Gender, and Subjectivity in Greek Tragedy . Pp. Xxxvii + 294. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1998. Cased, $40 (Paper, $19.95). ISBN: 0-292-79113-5 (0-292-79114-3 Pbk). [REVIEW] The Classical Review 49 (01):6-.
  17. Christopher Gill, Norman Postlethwaite & Richard Seaford (1998). Reciprocity in Ancient Greece. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  18. Richard Seaford (1998). Spaced Out Oedipus L. Edmunds: Theatrical Space and Historical Place in Sophocles' Oedipus at Colonus (Greek Studies: Interdisciplinary Approaches). Pp. Xii + 189. Lanham, Boulder, New York, and London: Rowman & Littlefield, 1996. $57.50 (Paper, $22.95). ISBN: 0-8476-8319-2 (0-8476-8320-6 Pbk). [REVIEW] The Classical Review 48 (01):4-5.
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  19. Richard Seaford (1998). Tragic Money. Journal of Hellenic Studies 118:119-139.
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  20. Richard Seaford (1994). Sophokles and the Mysteries. Hermes 122 (3):275-288.
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  21. Richard Seaford (1993). Jürgen Leonhardt: Phalloslied und Dithyrambos: Aristoteles über den Ursprung des griechischen Dramas. Vorgelegt von Uvo Hölscher. (Abhandlungen der Heidelberger Akademie der Wissenschaften, Philosophisch-historische Klasse, 1991, 4.) Pp. 76. Heidelberg: Carl Winter, 1991. Paper, DM 45. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 43 (01):180-.
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  22. Richard Seaford (1991). Readings of Hippolytus Barbara E. Goff: The Noose of Words. Readings of Desire, Violence and Language in Euripides' Hippolytos. Pp. Xiv + 140. Cambridge University Press, 1990. £22.50. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 41 (01):18-20.
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  23. Richard Seaford (1990). Marcel Detienne: Dionysos at Large (Translated by Arthur Goldhammer). (Revealing Antiquity, 1.) Pp. V + 90. Cambridge and London: Harvard University Press, 1989 (Originally Published as Dionysos À Ciel Ouvert, Hachette, 1986). £13.50. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 40 (01):173-174.
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  24. Richard Seaford (1990). The Imprisonment of Women in Greek Tragedy. Journal of Hellenic Studies 110:76-90.
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  25. Richard Seaford (1989). Arthur Evans: The God of Ecstasy. Sex-Roles and the Madness of Dionysos. Pp. 286; 11 Photographs. New York: St Martin's Press, 1988. $19.95. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 39 (01):145-.
  26. Richard Seaford (1989). The Attribution of Aeschylus, Choephoroi 691–9. Classical Quarterly 39 (02):302-.
    These lines are the first reaction to the false news of the death of Orestes. Their attribution has been much discussed. What prompts my intervention is the recent development, on this important problem, of a confident unanimity which seems to me certainly mistaken. I have been unable to find a single translator, editor, or commentator in recent years who gives the lines to Electra. The case for Electra was best made by Headlam–Thomson in 1938, and a few extra points were (...)
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  27. Richard Seaford (1988). The Eleventh Ode of Bacchylides: Hera, Artemis, and the Absence of Dionysos. Journal of Hellenic Studies 108:118-136.
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  28. Richard Seaford (1987). Pentheus′ Vision: Bacchae 918–22. Classical Quarterly 37 (01):76-.
    In an earlier contribution to this journal I argued that many details in the experience of Pentheus in the Bacchae derive from the ritual of mystic initiation. One of these details was his vision of two suns, two cities of Thebes, and Dionysos as a bull. I would like to add here a further point of the same kind about this vision.
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  29. Richard Seaford (1987). The Tragic Wedding. Journal of Hellenic Studies 107:106-130.
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  30. Richard Seaford (1986). Bacchae Hanse Oranje: Euripides' Bacchae. The Play and its Audience. (Mnemosyne Suppl. 78.) Pp. Viii + 200. Leiden: Brill, 1984. Paper, Fl. 64. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 36 (01):24-26.
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  31. Richard Seaford (1986). Wedding Ritual and Textual Criticism in Sophocles' 'Women of Trachis'. Hermes 114 (1):50-59.
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  32. Richard Seaford (1985). David Hellholm (Ed.): Apocalypticism in the Mediterranean World and the Near East. Pp. Xii + 878. Tübingen: J. C. B. Mohr (Paul Siebeck), 1983. DM. 285. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 35 (01):203-.
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  33. Richard Seaford (1985). Deborah H. Roberts: Apollo and His Oracle in the Oresteia. (Hypomnemata, 78.) Pp. 136. Göttingen: Vandenhoeck and Ruprecht, 1984. DM. 28. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 35 (01):180-181.
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  34. Richard Seaford (1985). The Destruction of Limits in Sophokles' Elektra. Classical Quarterly 35 (02):315-.
    Greek tragedy is full of rituals perverted by intra-familial conflict. To mention some examples from the house of Atreus: the funeral bath and the funeral covering, normally administered to a man's corpse by his wife as an expression of ιλία, have in Aeschylus' Oresteia become instruments in the killing of Agamemnon; the pouring of libations at the tomb, normally a θελκτήριον for the dead, becomes in the Choephoroi an occasion for his arousal; Euripides has Klytaimnestra ‘sacrificed’ while performing the sacrifice (...)
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  35. Richard Seaford (1984). The Last Bath of Agamemnon. Classical Quarterly 34 (02):247-.
    Most of the work done on tracing persistent themes and images in the Oresteia has failed to take account of the associations of the theme or image for the original audience. Some of these associations are with certain highly emotional rituals. In evoking the ritual the poet evokes also some at least of the emotion which generally accompanies its performance. I will take here as an example the association of the manner of Agamemnon's death, the fatal bath and the fatal (...)
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  36. Richard Seaford & C. Segal (1984). Dionysiac Poetics and Euripides' Bacchae. Journal of Hellenic Studies 104:203.
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  37. Richard Seaford (1983). Agora and Theatre Frank Kolb: Agora und Theater, Volks- und Festversammlung. (Archäologische Forschungen [Deutsches Archäologisches Institut], 9.) Pp. vi + 131; 18 diagrams. Berlin: Gebr. Mann Verlag, 1981. DM. 68. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 33 (02):288-289.
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  38. Richard Seaford (1982). The Date of Euripides' "Cyclops". Journal of Hellenic Studies 102:161-172.
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  39. Richard Seaford (1981). Dionysiac Drama and the Dionysiac Mysteries. Classical Quarterly 31 (02):252-.
    In Euripides' Bacchae Dionysos visits Thebes in disguise to establish his mysteries there. And so, given normal Euripidean practice, it is almost certain that in the lost part of his final speech Dionysos actually prescribed the establishment of his mysteries in Thebes. In the same way the Homeric Hymn to Demeter tells how the goddess came in disguise to Eleusis and finally established her mysteries there. After coming to Eleusis she performs certain actions in the house of king Celeus, for (...)
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  40. Richard Seaford (1981). Seth L. Schein: The Iambic Trimeter in Aeschylus and Sophocles. A Study in Metrical Form. (Columbia Studies in the Classical Tradition, 6.) Pp. Vi + 91. Leiden: Brill, 1979. Fl. 32. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 31 (01):108-109.
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  41. Richard Seaford (1980). Black Zeus in Sophocles' Inachos. Classical Quarterly 30 (01):23-.
    The papyrus fragments that belong almost certainly to Sophocles' Inacbos have been admirably discussed by Pfeiffer andCarden.1 But one remarkable feature that has never been explained adequatelyis the apparent reference to a black Zeus. P. Oxy. 2369 contains a fragmentarydescription of a stranger turning Io into a cow with a touch of his hand and thenleaving the palace.
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  42. Richard Seaford (1980). Luci Berkowitz: Thesaurus Linguae Graecae. Canon of Greek Authors and Works From Homer to A.D. 200. Pp. 330. University of California, Irvine: Thesaurus Linguae Graecae Publications, 1977. Paper.Marianne McDonald: A Semilemmatized Concordance to Euripides' Alcestis. Pages Unnumbered. University of California, Irvine: Thesaurus Linguae Graecae Publications, 1977. Paper.Marianne McDonald: A Semilemmatized Concordance to Euripides' Cyclops. Pages Unnumbered. University of California, Irvine: Thesaurus Linguae Graecae Publications, 1978. Paper.Marianne McDonald: A Semilemmatized Concordance to Euripides' Andromache. Pages Unnumbered. University of California, Irvine: Thesaurus Linguae Graecae Publications, 1978. Paper. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 30 (01):133-134.
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  43. Richard Seaford (1979). The Origins of Greek Drama Francisco R. Adrados: Festival, Comedy and Tragedy: The Greek Origins of Theatre. Pp. 478. Leiden: Brill, 1975. Cloth, Fl. 120. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 29 (01):3-5.
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  44. Richard Seaford (1976). Euripides, Cyclops 393–402. Classical Quarterly 26 (02):315-.
    Odysseus describes Polyphemus preparing his meal. One expects an indication of the terrifying size of the ; and so , lonely though it is in L, should not be abandoned: compare Ar. Pax.73 . must mean bowls for blood. But the blood of the Greeks flows into the cauldron . It seems probable therefore that is a comic periphrasis for the cauldron. Hermann read 395 after 399 as.
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  45. Richard Seaford (1975). Some Notes On Euripides' Cyclops. Classical Quarterly 25 (02):193-.
    L has …, P … Paley wanted to delete Subsequent editors did not take up the suggestion. J. Diggle on the other hand has proposed that was originally a gloss on ‘It would be no cause for surprise that a scribe who had never seen the like of Homer's should fuse the two versions by distributing the two in what he thought a fair and impartial manner.’ Diggle arrives at The metre is tidied up, the corruption explained. But would be (...)
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