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  1. New Zealand Policy on Frozen Embryo Disputes.Carolyn Mason - 2020 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 17 (1):121-131.
    Disputes between separated couples over whether frozen embryos can be used in an attempt to create a child create a moral dilemma for public policy. When a couple create embryos intending to parent any resulting children, New Zealand’s current policy requires the consent of both people at every stage of the ART process. New Zealand’s Advisory Committee on Assisted Reproductive Technology has proposed a policy change that would give ex-partners involved in an embryo dispute twelve months to come to an (...)
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  2. What is Pregnancy Ambivalence? Is It Maternal Ambivalence?Amanda Roth - 2020 - In The Maternal Tug: Ambivalence, Identity, and Agency. pp. 45-72.
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  3. What Should Be the RCOG's Relationship with Older Women?Donna Dickenson - 2009 - In Susan Bewley, William Ledger & Dimitrios Nikolaou (eds.), Reproductive Ageing. London: Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists. pp. 277-286.
    Reproductive ageing has effects on individual and public health, now and in generations to come. This volume of presentations from a conference at the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists brings together a diverse but timely set of contributions.. in ny chapter I specifically examine the responsibilities of the College to women outside normal reproductive age.
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  4. What Should Be the RCOG's Relationship with Older Women?Donna Dickenson - 2009 - In Reproductive Ageing. London: Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists Press. pp. 277-286.
    A ‘should’ question normally signals work for an ethicist but this ethicist’s task is complicated by the normative dimension of all the chapters in this volume. Each author was asked to come up with three recommendations from their own subject area – ’should’ statements deriving from the ‘is’ analysis that they present. If those prescriptions cover the relevant topics, what more is there for an ethicist to do? I have had a personal interest in obstetricians’ relationship with ‘older women’ since (...)
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  5. The Father of Ethology and the Foster Mother of Ducks: Konrad Lorenz as Expert on Motherhood.Marga Vicedo - 2009 - Isis 100 (2):263-291.
    Konrad Lorenz's popularity in the United States has to be understood in the context of social concern about the mother‐infant dyad after World War II. Child analysts David Levy, René Spitz, Margarethe Ribble, Therese Benedek, and John Bowlby argued that many psychopathologies were caused by a disruption in the mother‐infant bond. Lorenz extended his work on imprinting to humans and argued that maternal care was also instinctual. The conjunction of psychoanalysis and ethology helped shore up the view that the mother‐child (...)
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