Philosophy and Technology 1 (1):53-70 (2018)

Authors
Ingar Brinck
Lund University
Christian Balkenius
Lund University
Abstract
Mutually adaptive interaction involves the robot as a partner as opposed to a tool, and requires that the robot is susceptible to similar environmental cues and behavior patterns as humans are. Recognition, or the acknowledgement of the other as individual, is fundamental to mutually adaptive interaction between humans. We discuss what recognition involves and its behavioral manifestations, and describe the benefits of implementing it in HRI.
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Reprint years 2018, 2020
DOI 10.1007/s13347-018-0339-x
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References found in this work BETA

What We Owe to Each Other.Thomas Scanlon - 1998 - Belknap Press of Harvard University Press.
What We Owe to Each Other.Thomas Scanlon - 2002 - Mind 111 (442):323-354.
Phenomenology of the Social World.Alfred Schutz - 1967 - Northwestern University Press.

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Citations of this work BETA

Understanding A.I. — Can and Should We Empathize with Robots?Susanne Schmetkamp - 2020 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 11 (4):881-897.
Robotification & ethical cleansing.Marco Nørskov - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-17.

View all 7 citations / Add more citations

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