Year:

  1.  4
    The Epistemology of Non-distributive Profiles.Patrick Allo - 2020 - Philosophy and Technology 33 (3):379-409.
    The distinction between distributive and non-distributive profiles figures prominently in current evaluations of the ethical and epistemological risks that are associated with automated profiling practices. The diagnosis that non-distributive profiles may coincidentally situate an individual in the wrong category is often perceived as the central shortcoming of such profiles. According to this diagnosis, most risks can be retraced to the use of non-universal generalisations and various other statistical associations. This article develops a top-down analysis of non-distributive profiles in which this (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  11
    In AI We Trust Incrementally: a Multi-layer Model of Trust to Analyze Human-Artificial Intelligence Interactions.Andrea Ferrario, Michele Loi & Eleonora Viganò - 2020 - Philosophy and Technology 33 (3):523-539.
    Real engines of the artificial intelligence revolution, machine learning models, and algorithms are embedded nowadays in many services and products around us. As a society, we argue it is now necessary to transition into a phronetic paradigm focused on the ethical dilemmas stemming from the conception and application of AIs to define actionable recommendations as well as normative solutions. However, both academic research and society-driven initiatives are still quite far from clearly defining a solid program of study and intervention. In (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  3.  4
    The Fight for Digital Sovereignty: What It Is, and Why It Matters, Especially for the EU.Luciano Floridi - 2020 - Philosophy and Technology 33 (3):369-378.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  17
    The Ethical Limits of Blockchain-Enabled Markets for Private IoT Data.Georgy Ishmaev - 2020 - Philosophy and Technology 33 (3):411-432.
    This paper looks at the development of blockchain technologies that promise to bring new tools for the management of private data, providing enhanced security and privacy to individuals. Particular interest present solutions aimed at reorganizing data flows in the Internet of Things architectures, enabling the secure and decentralized exchange of data between network participants. However, as this paper argues, the promised benefits are counterbalanced by a significant shift towards the propertization of private data, underlying these proposals. Considering the unique capacity (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  11
    Dissecting the Algorithmic Leviathan: On the Socio-Political Anatomy of Algorithmic Governance.Pascal D. König - 2020 - Philosophy and Technology 33 (3):467-485.
    A growing literature is taking an institutionalist and governance perspective on how algorithms shape society based on unprecedented capacities for managing social complexity. Algorithmic governance altogether emerges as a novel and distinctive kind of societal steering. It appears to transcend established categories and modes of governance—and thus seems to call for new ways of thinking about how social relations can be regulated and ordered. However, as this paper argues, despite its novel way of realizing outcomes of collective steering and coordination, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  54
    Against Interpretability: a Critical Examination of the Interpretability Problem in Machine Learning.Maya Krishnan - 2020 - Philosophy and Technology 33 (3):487-502.
    The usefulness of machine learning algorithms has led to their widespread adoption prior to the development of a conceptual framework for making sense of them. One common response to this situation is to say that machine learning suffers from a “black box problem.” That is, machine learning algorithms are “opaque” to human users, failing to be “interpretable” or “explicable” in terms that would render categorization procedures “understandable.” The purpose of this paper is to challenge the widespread agreement about the existence (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  10
    AI Systems Under Criminal Law: a Legal Analysis and a Regulatory Perspective.Francesca Lagioia & Giovanni Sartor - 2020 - Philosophy and Technology 33 (3):433-465.
    Criminal liability for acts committed by AI systems has recently become a hot legal topic. This paper includes three different contributions. The first contribution is an analysis of the extent to which an AI system can satisfy the requirements for criminal liability: accomplishing an actus reus, having the corresponding mens rea, possessing the cognitive capacities needed for responsibility. The second contribution is a discussion of criminal activity accomplished by an AI entity, with reference to a recent case involving an online (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  16
    Robots in the Workplace: a Threat to—or Opportunity for—Meaningful Work?Jilles Smids, Sven Nyholm & Hannah Berkers - 2020 - Philosophy and Technology 33 (3):503-522.
    The concept of meaningful work has recently received increased attention in philosophy and other disciplines. However, the impact of the increasing robotization of the workplace on meaningful work has received very little attention so far. Doing work that is meaningful leads to higher job satisfaction and increased worker well-being, and some argue for a right to access to meaningful work. In this paper, we therefore address the impact of robotization on meaningful work. We do so by identifying five key aspects (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  9.  34
    How to Treat Machines that Might Have Minds.Nicholas Agar - 2020 - Philosophy and Technology 33 (2):269-282.
    This paper offers practical advice about how to interact with machines that we have reason to believe could have minds. I argue that we should approach these interactions by assigning credences to judgements about whether the machines in question can think. We should treat the premises of philosophical arguments about whether these machines can think as offering evidence that may increase or reduce these credences. I describe two cases in which you should refrain from doing as your favored philosophical view (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  10.  3
    On the Mutual Dependence Between Formal Methods and Empirical Testing in Program Verification.Nicola Angius - 2020 - Philosophy and Technology 33 (2):349-355.
    This paper provides a review of Raymond Turner’s book Computational Artefacts. Towards a Philosophy of Computer Science. Focus is made on the definition of program correctness as the twofold problem of evaluating whether both the symbolic program and the physical implementation satisfy a set of specifications. The review stresses how these are not two separate problems. First, it is highlighted how formal proofs of correctness need to rely on the analysis of physical computational processes. Secondly, it is underlined how software (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  11.  9
    Infringing Software Property Rights: Ontological, Methodological, and Ethical Questions.Nicola Angius & Giuseppe Primiero - 2020 - Philosophy and Technology 33 (2):283-308.
    This paper contributes to the computer ethics debate on software ownership protection by examining the ontological, methodological, and ethical problems related to property right infringement that should come prior to any legal discussion. The ontological problem consists in determining precisely what it is for a computer program to be a copy of another one, a largely neglected problem in computer ethics. The methodological problem is defined as the difficulty of deciding whether a given software system is a copy of another (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  12.  14
    Computer Science as Immaterial Formal Logic.Selmer Bringsjord - 2020 - Philosophy and Technology 33 (2):339-347.
    I critically review Raymond Turner’s Computational Artifacts – Towards a Philosophy of Computer Science by placing beside his position a rather different one, according to which computer science is a branch of, and is therefore subsumed by, immaterial formal logic.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  13.  55
    A Tale of Two Deficits: Causality and Care in Medical AI.Melvin Chen - 2020 - Philosophy and Technology 33 (2):245-267.
    In this paper, two central questions will be addressed: ought we to implement medical AI technology in the medical domain? If yes, how ought we to implement this technology? I will critically engage with three options that exist with respect to these central questions: the Neo-Luddite option, the Assistive option, and the Substitutive option. I will first address key objections on behalf of the Neo-Luddite option: the Objection from Bias, the Objection from Artificial Autonomy, the Objection from Status Quo, and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  14.  13
    Two Concepts of Group Privacy.Michele Loi & Markus Christen - 2020 - Philosophy and Technology 33 (2):207-224.
    Luciano Floridi was not the first to discuss the idea of group privacy, but he was perhaps the first to discuss it in relation to the insights derived from big data analytics. He has argued that it is important to investigate the possibility that groups have rights to privacy that are not reducible to the privacy of individuals forming such groups. In this paper, we introduce a distinction between two concepts of group privacy. The first, the “what happens in Vegas (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15.  16
    Mind the App—Considerations on the Ethical Risks of COVID-19 Apps.Floridi Luciano - 2020 - Philosophy and Technology 33 (2):167-172.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16.  5
    Design, Malfunction, Validity: Three More Tasks for the Philosophy of Computing.Giuseppe Primiero - 2020 - Philosophy and Technology 33 (2):331-337.
    We present a review of Raymond Turner’s Book Computational Artifacts – Towards a Philosophy of Computer Science, focusing on three main topics: Design, Malfunction, and Validity.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  17.  74
    Syntax, Semantics, and Computer Programs.William J. Rapaport - 2020 - Philosophy and Technology 33 (2):309-321.
    Turner argues that computer programs must have purposes, that implementation is not a kind of semantics, and that computers might need to understand what they do. I respectfully disagree: Computer programs need not have purposes, implementation is a kind of semantic interpretation, and neither human computers nor computing machines need to understand what they do.
    Direct download (4 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  18.  8
    About the “Trinity Thesis” Regarding the Ontology of Computer Programs.Henri Stephanou - 2020 - Philosophy and Technology 33 (2):323-330.
    This review of Turner’s “Computational Artifacts” focuses on one of the key novelties of the book, namely the proposal to understand the nature of computer programs as a “trinity” of specification, symbolic program, and physical process, replacing the traditional dualist views of programs as functional/structural or as symbolic/physical. This trinitarian view is found to be robust and helpful to solve typical issues of dualist views. Drawing comparisons with Simon’s view of the artifact as an interface, the author suggests that this (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  19.  5
    Computational Artifacts: The Things of Computer Science.Raymond Turner - 2020 - Philosophy and Technology 33 (2):357-367.
    The reviewers Rapaport, Stephanou, Angius, Primiero, and Bringsjord of Turner cover a broad range of topics in the philosophy of computer science. They either challenge the positions outlined in Turner or offer a more refined analysis. This article is a response to their challenges.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20.  10
    Branching Is Not a Bug; It’s a Feature: Personal Identity and Legal (and Moral) Responsibility.Mark Walker - 2020 - Philosophy and Technology 33 (2):173-190.
    Prospective developments in computer and nanotechnology suggest that there is some possibility—perhaps as early as this century—that we will have the technological means to attempt to duplicate people. For example, it has been speculated that the psychology of individuals might be emulated on a computer platform to create a personality duplicate—an “upload.” Physical duplicates might be created by advanced nanobots tasked with creating molecule-for-molecule copies of individuals. Such possibilities are discussed in the philosophical literature as cases of “fission”: one person (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21.  63
    Feminist AI: Can We Expect Our AI Systems to Become Feminist?Galit Wellner & Tiran Rothman - 2020 - Philosophy and Technology 33 (2):191-205.
    The rise of AI-based systems has been accompanied by the belief that these systems are impartial and do not suffer from the biases that humans and older technologies express. It becomes evident, however, that gender and racial biases exist in some AI algorithms. The question is where the bias is rooted—in the training dataset or in the algorithm? Is it a linguistic issue or a broader sociological current? Works in feminist philosophy of technology and behavioral economics reveal the gender bias (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22. Democratizing Algorithmic Fairness.Pak-Hang Wong - 2020 - Philosophy and Technology 33 (2):225-244.
    Algorithms can now identify patterns and correlations in the (big) datasets, and predict outcomes based on those identified patterns and correlations with the use of machine learning techniques and big data, decisions can then be made by algorithms themselves in accordance with the predicted outcomes. Yet, algorithms can inherit questionable values from the datasets and acquire biases in the course of (machine) learning, and automated algorithmic decision-making makes it more difficult for people to see algorithms as biased. While researchers have (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23.  26
    AI and Its New Winter: from Myths to Realities.Luciano Floridi - 2020 - Philosophy and Technology 33 (1):1-3.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24.  9
    Technology and Mathematics.Sven Ove Hansson - 2020 - Philosophy and Technology 33 (1):117-139.
    In spite of their practical importance, the connections between technology and mathematics have not received much scholarly attention. This article begins by outlining how the technology–mathematics relationship has developed, from the use of simple aide-mémoires for counting and arithmetic, via the use of mathematics in weaving, building and other trades, and the introduction of calculus to solve technological problems, to the modern use of computers to solve both technological and mathematical problems. Three important philosophical issues emerge from this historical résumé: (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25.  16
    The Hidden Dimensions of Human–Technology Relations.Scott T. Luan - 2020 - Philosophy and Technology 33 (1):141-165.
    In Technology and the Lifeworld, Don Ihde advances what he calls “formalisms” for the ways in which we experience or relate to technology. In this article, I seek to clarify the grammar of Ihde’s formalisms. Ihde’s formalisms have not been the focus of scrutiny. Rather, they have largely been received in the literature as merely aphoristic or epigrammatical devices serving to clarify what can be explained in prose. My hypothesis is that Ihde’s formalisms do not merely serve an epigrammatical function (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26.  10
    Social Robots and Recognition.Marco Nørskov & Sladjana Nørskov - 2020 - Philosophy and Technology 33 (1):5-8.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27.  2
    Dark Data as the New Challenge for Big Data Science and the Introduction of the Scientific Data Officer.Björn Schembera & Juan M. Durán - 2020 - Philosophy and Technology 33 (1):93-115.
    Many studies in big data focus on the uses of data available to researchers, leaving without treatment data that is on the servers but of which researchers are unaware. We call this dark data, and in this article, we present and discuss it in the context of high-performance computing facilities. To this end, we provide statistics of a major HPC facility in Europe, the High-Performance Computing Center Stuttgart. We also propose a new position tailor-made for coping with dark data and (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28.  10
    The Transparency Game: Government Information, Access, and Actionability.Orlin Vakarelov & Kenneth Rogerson - 2020 - Philosophy and Technology 33 (1):71-92.
    Democratic governments might be required by law to disseminate information to the people. This is called governmental transparency. What is the burden of transparency? We propose a “pragmatic information theory of communication” that places information accessibility as a foundation of transparency. Using a game model—the Transparency Game—we show that the pragmatic theory is the only one that makes it difficult for governments to appear transparent while not actually being transparent. There are two important consequences of understanding transparency through the theory: (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29.  9
    Recognition, Encounter, and Estrangement, in the Work of Zhou Song.Stacey Vorster - 2020 - Philosophy and Technology 33 (1):33-52.
    While most discussions of the relationship between art and technology focus on “new media” practice, there are substantial opportunities to consider technology through “traditional media” such as painting and sculpture. Art and technology intersect through the process and desire of imagination and, in particular, through the attempt to imitate life itself in terms of creation. In this paper, I consider the practice of Beijing-based artist Zhou Song, who images and imagines new worlds as constituted by social robots. Drawing on the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30.  3
    Unintentional Trolling: How Subjects Express Their Prejudices Through Made-Up Stories.René Baston & Benedict Kenyah-Damptey - 2020 - Philosophy and Technology:1-16.
    It is often assumed that trolling is an intentional action. The aim of the paper is to argue for a form of unintentional trolling. Firstly, we outline minimal conditions for intentional actions. Secondly, an unintentional trolling example is introduced. Thirdly, we will show that in some cases, an utterance can be expressive, while it is perceived as descriptive. On the basis of the justification-suppression model, we argue that the introduced trolling example is such a case. In order to bypass social (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
 Previous issues
  
Next issues