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  1.  4
    A public health framework for reducing stigma: the example of weight stigma.Alison Harwood, Drew Carter & Jaklin Eliott - 2022 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 19 (3):511-520.
    We examine stigma and how it operates, then develop a novel framework to classify the range of positions that are conceptually possible regarding how stigma ought to be handled from a public health perspective. In the case of weight stigma, the possible positions range from encouraging the intentional use of weight stigma as an obesity prevention and reduction strategy to arguing not only that this is harmful but that weight stigma, independent of obesity, needs to be actively challenged and reduced. (...)
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  2.  10
    The Equivalence Thesis and the Last Ventilator.Andrew McGee & Drew Carter - 2022 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 39 (2):297-312.
    Journal of Applied Philosophy, EarlyView.
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  3.  25
    Competing Principles for Allocating Health Care Resources.Drew Carter, Jason Gordon & Amber M. Watt - 2016 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 41 (5):558-583.
    We clarify options for conceptualizing equity, or what we refer to as justice, in resource allocation. We do this by systematically differentiating, expounding, and then illustrating eight different substantive principles of justice. In doing this, we compare different meanings that can be attributed to “need” and “the capacity to benefit”. Our comparison is sharpened by two analytical tools. First, quantification helps to clarify the divergent consequences of allocations commended by competing principles. Second, a diagrammatic approach developed by economists Culyer and (...)
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  4.  19
    Justice and Surgical Innovation: The Case of Robotic Prostatectomy.Katrina Hutchison, Jane Johnson & Drew Carter - 2016 - Bioethics 30 (7):536-546.
    Surgical innovation promises improvements in healthcare, but it also raises ethical issues including risks of harm to patients, conflicts of interest and increased injustice in access to health care. In this article, we focus on risks of injustice, and use a case study of robotic prostatectomy to identify features of surgical innovation that risk introducing or exacerbating injustices. Interpreting justice as encompassing matters of both efficiency and equity, we first examine questions relating to government decisions about whether to publicly fund (...)
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  5.  36
    The Appeal to Nature Implicit in Certain Restrictions on Public Funding for Assisted Reproductive Technology.Drew Carter & Annette Braunack-Mayer - 2011 - Bioethics 25 (8):463-471.
    Certain restrictions on public funding for assisted reproductive technology (ART) are articulated and defended by recourse to a distinction between medical infertility and social infertility. We propose that underlying the prioritization of medical infertility is a vision of medicine whose proper role is to restore but not to improve upon nature. We go on to mark moral responses that speak of investments many continue to make in nature as properly an object of reverence and gratitude and therein (sometimes) a source (...)
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  6.  46
    Should There Be a Female Age Limit on Public Funding for Assisted Reproductive Technology?: Differing Conceptions of Justice in Resource Allocation.Drew Carter, Amber M. Watt, Annette Braunack-Mayer, Adam G. Elshaug, John R. Moss & Janet E. Hiller - 2013 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (1):79-91.
    Should there be a female age limit on public funding for assisted reproductive technology (ART)? The question bears significant economic and sociopolitical implications and has been contentious in many countries. We conceptualise the question as one of justice in resource allocation, using three much-debated substantive principles of justice—the capacity to benefit, personal responsibility, and need—to structure and then explore a complex of arguments. Capacity-to-benefit arguments are not decisive: There are no clear cost-effectiveness grounds to restrict funding to those older women (...)
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  7.  8
    Morality and a Scaffolding of Facts.Drew Carter - 2014 - Philosophical Investigations 37 (1):78-90.
    In reply to Michael Campbell, I reformulate my questions of Raimond Gaita, avoiding the expression “form of life”. I examine what might remove the need for my questions, before taking up Campbell's line of thought about what he calls the “inwardness” of moral concepts. Campbell helps to clarify the picture of moral concepts advanced by Wittgensteinian moral philosophers. But at a general level, the picture remains unclear where a grammar meets its scaffolding of facts. Some may find this unproblematic, and (...)
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  8.  44
    “Part of the Very Concept”: Wittgensteinian Moral Philosophy1.Drew Carter - 2013 - Philosophical Investigations 36 (1):37-55.
    X is “part of the very concept” of Y. This formulation recurs throughout Raimond Gaita's philosophy and informs Christopher Cordner's. I elucidate the formulation's meaning and the nature of the necessity posited, then conclude with a criticism. One cannot love evil. One cannot love cow dung. For Gaita, these claims differ in type. The first testifies to a conceptual relation, but the second to a “mere fact.” I see no clear basis for assigning to claims one type over another, which (...)
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  9.  7
    Why is Pain Still Under‐Treated in the Emergency Department? Two New Hypotheses.Drew Carter, Paul Sendziuk, Jaklin A. Eliott & Annette Braunack-Mayer - 2016 - Bioethics 30 (3):195-202.
    Across the world, pain is under-treated in emergency departments. We canvass the literature testifying to this problem, the reasons why this problem is so important, and then some of the main hypotheses that have been advanced in explanation of the problem. We then argue for the plausibility of two new hypotheses: pain's under-treatment in the ED is due partly to an epistemic preference for signs over symptoms on the part of some practitioners, and some ED practices that themselves worsen pain (...)
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