Results for 'Hippocampus'

206 found
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  1.  28
    Associations Across Time: The Hippocampus as a Temporary Memory Store.J. N. P. Rawlins - 1985 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (3):479-497.
    All recent memory theories of hippocampal function have incorporated the idea that the hippocampus is required to process items only of some qualitatively specifiahle kind, and is not required to process items of some complementary set. In contrast, it is now proposed that the hippocampus is needed to process stimuli of all kinds, but only when there is a need to associate those stimuli with other events that are temporally discontiguous. In order to form or use temporally discontiguous (...)
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  2.  32
    Such Stuff as Dreams Are Made On? Elaborative Encoding, the Ancient Art of Memory, and the Hippocampus.Sue Llewellyn - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (6):589-607.
    This article argues that rapid eye movement (REM) dreaming is elaborative encoding for episodic memories. Elaborative encoding in REM can, at least partially, be understood through ancient art of memory (AAOM) principles: visualization, bizarre association, organization, narration, embodiment, and location. These principles render recent memories more distinctive through novel and meaningful association with emotionally salient, remote memories. The AAOM optimizes memory performance, suggesting that its principles may predict aspects of how episodic memory is configured in the brain. Integration and segregation (...)
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  3.  18
    Active Hippocampus During Nonconscious Memories.Katharina Henke, Valerie Treyer, Eva Turi Nagy, Stefan Kneifel, Max Dürsteler, Roger M. Nitsch & Alfred Buck - 2003 - Consciousness and Cognition 12 (1):31-48.
    The hippocampal formation is known for its importance in conscious, declarative memory. Here, we report neuroimaging evidence in humans for an additional role of the hippocampal formation in nonconscious memory. We maskedly presented combinations of faces and written professions such that subjects were not aware of them. Nevertheless, the masked presentations activated many of the brain regions that unmasked presentations of these stimuli did. To induce a nonconscious retrieval of the faces and face-associated occupational information, subjects were instructed to view (...)
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  4.  31
    Hippocampus, Space, and Memory.David S. Olton, James T. Becker & Gail E. Handelmann - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (3):313-322.
  5.  34
    Précis of O'Keefe & Nadel's The Hippocampus as a Cognitive Map.John O'Keefe & Lynn Nadel - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (4):487-494.
  6.  30
    How the Hippocampus Represents Memories: Making Sense of Memory Allocation Studies.Thiago F. A. França & José M. Monserrat - 2018 - Bioessays 40 (11):800068.
  7.  11
    Relationships Between the Superior Colliculus and Hippocampus: Neural and Behavioral Considerations.Nigel Foreman & Robin Stevens - 1987 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 10 (1):101-119.
  8. The Hippocampus: Hub of Brain Network Communication for Memory.Francesco P. Battaglia, Karim Benchenane, Anton Sirota, Cyriel M. A. Pennartz & Sidney I. Wiener - 2011 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 15 (7):310-318.
    A complex brain network, centered on the hippocampus, supports episodic memories throughout their lifetimes. Classically, upon memory encoding during active behavior, hippocampal activity is dominated by theta oscillations (6-10Hz). During inactivity, hippocampal neurons burst synchronously, constituting sharp waves, which can propagate to other structures, theoretically supporting memory consolidation. This 'two-stage' model has been updated by new data from high-density electrophysiological recordings in animals that shed light on how information is encoded and exchanged between hippocampus, neocortex and subcortical structures (...)
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  9.  20
    Perirhinal Cortex and Hippocampus Mediate Parallel Processing of Object and Spatial Location Information.Raymond P. Kesner - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):455-455.
    An alternative to Aggleton & Brown's interpretation is presented suggesting that the perirhinal cortex and hippocampus mediate different attribute information, but use the same processes, supporting the idea of parallel processing based on attribute (visual object and spatial location) rather than process characteristics (item recognition and familiarity).
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  10.  18
    A Unique Role for the Hippocampus in Recollecting the Past and Remembering the Future.Valerie A. Carr & Indre V. Viskontas - 2007 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (3):319-320.
    Suddendorf & Corballis (S&C) argue that episodic memory is the most flexible and recently evolved memory system, and point to the reorganization of prefrontal cortex throughout human evolution as the neuroanatomical substrate. Their approach, however, fails to address the unique role that the hippocampus, a primitive brain region, plays in creating and recalling episodic memories, as well as future event construction.
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  11.  11
    The Hippocampus and Path Integration.Ian Q. Whishaw - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):467-467.
    Recent studies of the contribution made by the hippocampus to spatial behavior suggest that it plays a role in integrating and double integrating distance and direction information using cues generated by self-movement. This and other evidence that the hippocampus plays a central role in spatial behavior seems inconsistent with proposals that it is primarily involved in episodic memory.
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  12.  20
    Cantor Coding and Chaotic Itinerancy: Relevance for Episodic Memory, Amnesia, and the Hippocampus?Jonathan K. Foster - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (5):815-816.
    This commentary provides a critique of Tsuda's target article, focusing on the hippocampus and episodic long-term memory. More specifically, the relevance of Cantor coding and chaotic itinerancy for long-term memory functioning is considered, given what we know about the involvement of the hippocampus in the mediation of long-term episodic memory (based on empirical neuroimaging studies and investigations of brain-damaged amnesic patients).
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  13.  17
    Remembering the Hippocampus.Stuart M. Zola & Larry R. Squire - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):469-471.
    The proposal that the hippocampus is important for the encoding of episodic information, but not familiarity-based recognition, is incompatible with the available data. An alternative way to think about functional specialization within the medial temporal lobe memory system is suggested, based on neuroanatomy.
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  14.  18
    Thalamic Amnesia and the Hippocampus: Unresolved Questions and an Alternative Candidate.Robert G. Mair, Joshua A. Burk, M. Christine Porter & Jessica E. Ley - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):458-459.
    Aggleton & Brown have built a convincing case that hippocampus-related circuits may be involved in thalamic amnesia. It remains to be established, however, that their model represents a distinct neurological system, that the distinction between recall and familiarity captures the roles of these pathways in episodic memory, or that there are no other systems that contribute to the signs of amnesia associated with thalamic disease.
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  15.  15
    Avian and Mammalian Hippocampus: No Degrees of Freedom in Evolution of Function.Michael Colombo - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (5):554-555.
    Aboitiz et al. suggest that the mammalian isocortex is derived from the dorsal cortex of reptiles and birds, and that there has been a major divergence in the connectivity patterns (and hence function) of the mammalian and reptilian/avian hippocampus. There is considerable evidence to suggest, however, that the avian hippocampus serves the exact same function as the mammalian hippocampus.
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  16.  13
    Memory and the Hippocampus: A Synthesis From Findings with Rats, Monkeys, and Humans.Larry R. Squire - 1992 - Psychological Review 99 (2):195-231.
  17.  10
    Why There Are Complementary Learning Systems in the Hippocampus and Neocortex: Insights From the Successes and Failures of Connectionist Models of Learning and Memory.James L. McClelland, Bruce L. McNaughton & Randall C. O'Reilly - 1995 - Psychological Review 102 (3):419-457.
  18.  20
    The Hippocampus: A Manifesto for Change.Eleanor A. Maguire & Sinéad L. Mullally - 2013 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 142 (4):1180.
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  19.  3
    "Memory and the Hippocampus: A Synthesis From Findings with Rats, Monkeys, and Humans": Correction.Larry R. Squire - 1992 - Psychological Review 99 (3):582-582.
  20.  4
    Expanding the Language Network: Direct Contributions From the Hippocampus.Natalie V. Covington & Melissa C. Duff - 2016 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 20 (12):869-870.
  21.  24
    The Cognitive Map as a Hippocampus.John O'Keefe & Lynn Nadel - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (4):520-533.
  22.  31
    Long-Axis Specialization of the Human Hippocampus.Jordan Poppenk, Hallvard R. Evensmoen, Morris Moscovitch & Lynn Nadel - 2013 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 17 (5):230-240.
  23. The Contribution of Sleep to Hippocampus-Dependent Memory Consolidation.Lisa Marshall & Jan Born - 2007 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (10):442-450.
  24.  6
    A Closer Look at the Hippocampus and Memory.Joel L. Voss, Donna J. Bridge, Neal J. Cohen & John A. Walker - 2017 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 21 (8):577-588.
  25.  19
    How the Hippocampus Preserves Order: The Role of Prediction and Context.Lila Davachi & Sarah DuBrow - 2015 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 19 (2):92-99.
  26.  11
    The Role of the Hippocampus in Flexible Cognition and Social Behavior.Rachael D. Rubin, Patrick D. Watson, Melissa C. Duff & Neal J. Cohen - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  27.  18
    Space and Time: The Hippocampus as a Sequence Generator.György Buzsáki & David Tingley - 2018 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 22 (10):853-869.
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  28.  7
    The Hippocampus: Part of an Interactive Posterior Representational System Spanning Perceptual and Memorial Systems.Lynn Nadel & Mary A. Peterson - 2013 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 142 (4):1242-1254.
  29.  7
    A Re-Examination of the Role of Hippocampus in Working Memory.David S. Olton, James T. Becker & Gail E. Handelmann - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (3):352-365.
  30.  10
    On the Hippocampus, Time, and Interference.Leonard E. Jarrard - 1985 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (3):503-504.
  31.  5
    Functions of Neuronal Networks in the Hippocampus and of Backprojections in the Cerebral Cortex in Memory.Edmund T. Rolls - 1990 - In J. McGaugh, Jerry Weinberger & G. Lynch (eds.), Brain Organization and Memory. Guilford Press. pp. 184--210.
  32.  3
    A Gating Function for the Hippocampus in Working Memory.Thomas L. Bennett - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (3):322-323.
  33. The Startled Seahorse: Is the Hippocampus Necessary for Contextual Fear Conditioning?Stephen Maren, Stephan G. Anagnostaras & Michael S. Fanselow - 1998 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 2 (2):39-42.
  34.  6
    Dissociable Roles of the Hippocampus and Parietal Cortex in Processing of Coordinate and Categorical Spatial Information.Oliver Baumann & Jason B. Mattingley - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  35.  6
    Stimulus Familiarity Modulates Functional Connectivity of the Perirhinal Cortex and Anterior Hippocampus During Visual Discrimination of Faces and Objects.Victoria C. McLelland, David Chan, Susanne Ferber & Morgan D. Barense - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  36.  5
    The Hippocampus is Not a Geometric Module: Processing Environment Geometry During Reorientation.Jennifer E. Sutton & Nora S. Newcombe - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  37.  28
    Does the Hippocampus Map Out the Future?Daniel Bendor & Hugo J. Spiers - 2016 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 20 (3):167-169.
  38.  69
    Cognitive Maps and the Hippocampus.Timothy P. McNamara & Amy L. Shelton - 2003 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (8):333-335.
  39.  56
    Theta Activity, Virtual Navigation and the Human Hippocampus.John O’Keefe & Neil Burgess - 1999 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 3 (11):403-406.
  40.  6
    Aberrant Intrinsic Connectivity of Hippocampus and Amygdala Overlap in the Fronto-Insular and Dorsomedial-Prefrontal Cortex in Major Depressive Disorder.Masoud Tahmasian, David C. Knight, Andrei Manoliu, Dirk Schwerthöffer, Martin Scherr, Chun Meng, Junming Shao, Henning Peters, Anselm Doll, Habibolah Khazaie, Alexander Drzezga, Josef Bäuml, Claus Zimmer, Hans Förstl, Afra M. Wohlschläger, Valentin Riedl & Christian Sorg - 2013 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.
  41.  8
    Hippocampus, Space, and Relations.Lynn Nadel - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):490-491.
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  42.  4
    The Hippocampus and Spatial Constraints on Mental Imagery.Chris M. Bird, James A. Bisby & Neil Burgess - 2012 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.
  43.  14
    Decoding Illusory Self-Location From Activity in the Human Hippocampus.Arvid Guterstam, Malin Björnsdotter, Loretxu Bergouignan, Giovanni Gentile, Tie-Qiang Li & H. Henrik Ehrsson - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  44.  9
    The Hippocampus: Relational Processor or Antiprocessor?Neil McNaughton - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):487-488.
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  45.  15
    Explaining Learning: From Analysis to Paralysis to Hippocampus.John Clark - 2005 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 37 (5):667–687.
    This paper seeks to explain learning by examining five theories of learning—conceptual analysis, behavioural, constructivist, computational and connectionist. The first two are found wanting and rejected. Piaget's constructivist theory offers a general explanatory framework but fails to provide an adequate account of the empirical mechanisms of learning. Two theories from cognitive science offering rival explanations of learning are finally considered; it is argued that the brain is not like a computer so the computational model is rejected in favour of a (...)
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  46.  8
    How Long Do Relational Representations in the Hippocampus Last During Classical Eyelid Conditioning?Donald B. Katz & Joseph E. Steinmetz - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):484-485.
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  47.  8
    The Hippocampus, Time, and Memory Across Scales.Marc W. Howard & Howard Eichenbaum - 2013 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 142 (4):1211-1230.
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  48.  11
    Gene Expression in the Hippocampus in a Rat Model of Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder After Treatment With Baixiangdan Capsules.Sheng Wei, Peng Sun, Yinghui Guo, Jingxuan Chen, Jieqiong Wang, Chunhong Song, Zifa Li, Ling Xue & Mingqi Qiao - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  49.  9
    Explaining Learning: From Analysis to Paralysis to Hippocampus.John Clark - 2005 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 37 (5):667-687.
    This paper seeks to explain learning by examining five theories of learning—conceptual analysis, behavioural, constructivist, computational and connectionist. The first two are found wanting and rejected. Piaget's constructivist theory offers a general explanatory framework but fails to provide an adequate account of the empirical mechanisms of learning. Two theories from cognitive science offering rival explanations of learning are finally considered; it is argued that the brain is not like a computer so the computational model is rejected in favour of a (...)
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  50.  6
    Hippocampus and Memory for Time.Raymond P. Kesner - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):485-486.
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