9 found
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  1.  44
    Mapping the Dimensions of Agency.Andreas Schönau, Ishan Dasgupta, Timothy Brown, Erika Versalovic, Eran Klein & Sara Goering - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 12 (2):172-186.
    Neural devices have the capacity to enable users to regain abilities lost due to disease or injury – for instance, a deep brain stimulator (DBS) that allows a person with Parkinson’s disease to regain the ability to fluently perform movements or a Brain Computer Interface (BCI) that enables a person with spinal cord injury to control a robotic arm. While users recognize and appreciate the technologies’ capacity to maintain or restore their capabilities, the neuroethics literature is replete with examples of (...)
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  2. Views of stakeholders at risk for dementia about deep brain stimulation for cognition.Eran Klein, Natalia Montes Daza, Ishan Dasgupta, Kate MacDuffie, Andreas Schönau, Garrett Flynn, Dong Song & Sara Goering - 2023 - Brain Stimulation 16 (3):742-747.
  3.  21
    Asking questions that matter – Question prompt lists as tools for improving the consent process for neurotechnology clinical trials.Andreas Schönau, Sara Goering, Erika Versalovic, Natalia Montes, Tim Brown, Ishan Dasgupta & Eran Klein - 2022 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 16.
    Implantable neurotechnology devices such as Brain Computer Interfaces and Deep Brain Stimulators are an increasing part of treating or exploring potential treatments for neurological and psychiatric disorders. While only a few devices are approved, many promising prospects for future devices are under investigation. The decision to participate in a clinical trial can be challenging, given a variety of risks to be taken into consideration. During the consent process, prospective participants might lack the language to consider those risks, feel unprepared, or (...)
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  4.  6
    What Happens After a Neural Implant Study? Neuroethics Expert Workshop on Post-Trial Obligations.Ishan Dasgupta, Eran Klein, Laura Y. Cabrera, Winston Chiong, Ashley Feinsinger, Joseph J. Fins, Tobias Haeusermann, Saskia Hendriks, Gabriel Lázaro-Muñoz, Cynthia Kubu, Helen Mayberg, Khara Ramos, Adina Roskies, Lauren Sankary, Ashley Walton, Alik S. Widge & Sara Goering - 2024 - Neuroethics 17 (2):1-14.
    What happens at the end of a clinical trial for an investigational neural implant? It may be surprising to learn how difficult it is to answer this question. While new trials are initiated with increasing regularity, relatively little consensus exists on how best to conduct them, and even less on how to ethically end them. The landscape of recent neural implant trials demonstrates wide variability of what happens to research participants after an neural implant trial ends. Some former research participants (...)
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  5.  24
    Ethical Oversight of Direct-to-Consumer Neurotechnologies: The FDA, the FTC, or Self-Regulation?Ishan Dasgupta - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 10 (4):200-201.
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  6.  36
    Sport Is Arbitrary, and That's OK.Dan O'Connor & Ishan Dasgupta - 2012 - American Journal of Bioethics 12 (7):30 - 31.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 7, Page 30-31, July 2012.
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  7.  25
    From Sports Ethics to Labor Relations.Ishan Dasgupta & Dan O’Connor - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (10):17 - 18.
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  8.  2
    "In the spectrum of people who are healthy": Views of individuals at risk of dementia on using neurotechnology for cognitive enhancement.Asad Beck, Andreas Schönau, Kate MacDuffie, Ishan Dasgupta, Garrett Flynn, Dong Song, Sara Goering & Eran Klein - 2024 - Neuroethics 17 (2):1-18.
    Neurotechnological cognitive enhancement has become an area of intense scientific, policy, and ethical interest. However, while work has increasingly focused on ethical views of the general public, less studied are those with personal connections to cognitive impairment. Using a mixed-methods design, we surveyed attitudes regarding implantable neurotechnological cognitive enhancement in individuals who self-identified as having increased likelihood of developing dementia (n = 25; ‘Our Study’), compared to a nationally representative sample of Americans (n = 4726; ‘Pew Study’). Participants in Our (...)
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  9. Neuroengineering and Ethics: Identifying Common Themes and Areas of Need Across Proposed Ethical Frameworks.Michelle Trang Pham, Matthew Sample, Ishan Dasgupta, Sara Goering & Eran Klein - forthcoming - In Nitish V. Thakor (ed.), Springer Handbook of Neuroengineering.
    Recent advancements in neuroengineering research have prompted neuroethicists to propose a variety of “ethical guidance” frameworks (e.g., principles, guidelines, framing questions, responsible research innovation frameworks, and ethical priorities) to inform this work. In this chapter, we offer a comparative analysis of five recently proposed ethical guidance frameworks (NIH neuroethics guiding principles, Nuffield Council on Bioethics, Global Neuroethics Summit Delegates, the Center for Neurotechnology’s neuroethical principles and guidelines, and the Neurotechnology Ethics Taskforce’s ethical priorities). We identify some common themes among these (...)
     
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