23 found
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  1.  18
    Epistemic Virtue, Prospective Parents and Disability Abortion.James B. Gould - 2019 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 16 (3):389-404.
    Research shows that a high majority of parents receiving prenatal diagnosis of intellectual disability terminate pregnancy. They have reasons for rejecting a child with intellectual disabilities—these reasons are, most commonly, beliefs about quality of life for it or them. Without a negative evaluation of intellectual disability, their choice makes no sense. Disability-based abortion has been critiqued through virtue ethics for being inconsistent with admirable moral character. Parental selectivity conflicts with the virtue of acceptingness and exhibits the vice of wilfulness. In (...)
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  2.  9
    Contributors for Volume 1.3.Todd F. Eklof, Morten Fastvold, James B. Gould, Ora Gruengard, Amy Hannon, Grigoris Mouladoudis, Robert J. Parmach, Bernard Roy, Christopher Schreiner & Reinhard Zaiser - 2005 - Philosophical Practice 1 (3).
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  3.  26
    A Sobering Topic.James B. Gould - 1998 - Teaching Philosophy 21 (4):339-360.
    While there are many significant ethical questions which can deliver the lessons of an introductory ethics course , students do not face these moral difficulties directly in their lives. The author argues that commonly-faced ethical questions are more effective for rendering the content of introductory ethics immediately relevant to students. This paper presents a general outline of an introductory ethics course structured around the theme of drunk driving. Not only is drunk driving something that college students are confronted with consistently, (...)
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  4.  7
    A Sobering Topic: Discussing Drunk Driving in Introductory Ethics.James B. Gould - 1998 - Teaching Philosophy 21 (4):339-360.
    While there are many significant ethical questions which can deliver the lessons of an introductory ethics course, students do not face these moral difficulties directly in their lives. The author argues that commonly-faced ethical questions are more effective for rendering the content of introductory ethics immediately relevant to students. This paper presents a general outline of an introductory ethics course structured around the theme of drunk driving. Not only is drunk driving something that college students are confronted with consistently, but (...)
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  5.  45
    Bonhoeffer and Open Theism.James B. Gould - 2003 - Philosophy and Theology 15 (1):57-91.
    The theology of Dietrich Bonhoeffer, which is deeply rooted in classical Christology and Lutheran orthodoxy, has close affinities with views about the nature of God and God’s relationship with the world that has recently been labeled “open theism.” Bonhoeffer’s concepts of God, freedom, providence and ethics provide relational views of God with firm theological credentials and exemplify a strong integration of philosophy and theology.
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  6.  28
    Better Hearts.James B. Gould - 2002 - Teaching Philosophy 25 (1):1-25.
    Too often, ethics courses are taught in a way that Aristotle would reject, viz., they aim at the acquisition of theoretical moral knowledge as an end in itself. Aristotle instead argued that the ultimate goal in studying ethics should be to become good. This paper proposes a way to teach introductory ethics that takes Aristotle’s goal seriously. Such a course emphasizes the study of applied virtue ethics by exploring the nature of many of the most dangerous vices and detailing various (...)
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  7.  14
    Better Hearts: Teaching Applied Virtue Ethics.James B. Gould - 2002 - Teaching Philosophy 25 (1):1-25.
    Too often, ethics courses are taught in a way that Aristotle would reject, viz., they aim at the acquisition of theoretical moral knowledge as an end in itself. Aristotle instead argued that the ultimate goal in studying ethics should be to become good. This paper proposes a way to teach introductory ethics that takes Aristotle’s goal seriously. Such a course emphasizes the study of applied virtue ethics by exploring the nature of many of the most dangerous vices and detailing various (...)
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  8.  43
    Broad Inclusive Salvation: The Logic of “Anonymous Christianity”.James B. Gould - 2008 - Philosophy and Theology 20 (1/2):175-198.
    In this paper I defend three points: God loves and desires the salvation of every human person, saving grace is available outside of the Christian church to those who do not hear the gospel but pursue moral goodness and most, if not all, human persons will be saved. I argue that soteriological restrictivism is logically incoherent since its two ideas—every person is loved by God and only those who hear and believe the Christian gospel can be saved—cannot both be true. (...)
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  9.  38
    Consenting Adults?James B. Gould - 2004 - Teaching Philosophy 27 (3):221-236.
    This paper reports on a pedagogical strategy used when discussing consensual and non-consensual sex in college ethics courses. The paper outlines a general teaching technique designed to elicit what students already think about a particular issue and then applies this general technique to the seven specific cases involving unwanted sex. Classroom results on these cases are described, reporting that students tend to adopt two different definitions of what it means for sex to be “consensual”. A commentary on these cases is (...)
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  10.  7
    Consenting Adults?: A Strategy for Discussing Unwanted Sex.James B. Gould - 2004 - Teaching Philosophy 27 (3):221-236.
    This paper reports on a pedagogical strategy used when discussing consensual and non-consensual sex in college ethics courses. The paper outlines a general teaching technique designed to elicit what students already think about a particular issue and then applies this general technique to the seven specific cases involving unwanted sex. Classroom results on these cases are described, reporting that students tend to adopt two different definitions of what it means for sex to be “consensual”. A commentary on these cases is (...)
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  11. Cultivating Character: Hume's Techniques for Self-Improvement.James B. Gould - 2011 - Philosophical Practice: Journal of the American Philosophical Practitioners Association (American Philosophical Practitioners Association) 6 (3).
     
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  12.  2
    Covid 19, Disability, and the Ethics of Distributing Scarce Resources.James B. Gould - 2020 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 26 (1):38-68.
    The Covid-19 pandemic provides a real-world context for evaluating the fairness of disability-based rationing of scarce medical resources. I discuss three situations clinicians may face: rationing based on disability itself; rationing based on inevitable disability-related comorbidities; and rationing based on preventable disability-related comorbidities. I defend three conclusions. First, in a just distribution, extraneous factors do not influence a person’s share. This rules out rationing based on disability alone, where no comorbidities decrease a person’s capacity to benefit from treatment. Second, in (...)
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  13.  12
    Christian Faith, Intellectual Disability and the Mere Difference / Bad Difference Debate in Advance.James B. Gould - forthcoming - Philosophy and Theology.
  14.  5
    Christian Faith, Intellectual Disability, and the Mere Difference / Bad Difference Debate.James B. Gould - 2018 - Philosophy and Theology 30 (2):447-477.
    The mere difference view, endorsed by some philosophers and Christian scholars, claims that disability by itself does not make a person worse off on balance—any negative impacts on overall welfare are due to social injustice. This article defends the bad difference view—some disability is bad not simply because of social arrangements but because of biological deficits that, by themselves, make a person worse off. It argues that the mere difference view contradicts core doctrines of Christian faith. The analysis focuses on (...)
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  15.  5
    Culpable Ignorance, Professional Counselling, and Selective Abortion of Intellectual Disability.James B. Gould - 2020 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 17 (3):369-381.
    In this paper I argue that selective abortion for disability often involves inadequate counselling on the part of reproductive medicine professionals who advise prospective parents. I claim that prenatal disability clinicians often fail in intellectual duty—they are culpably ignorant about intellectual disability. First, I explain why a standard motivation for selective abortion is flawed. Second, I summarize recent research on parent experience with prenatal professionals. Third, I outline the notions of epistemic excellence and deficiency. Fourth, I defend culpable ignorance as (...)
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  16.  49
    Discussing Divorce in Introductory Ethics.James B. Gould - 1995 - Teaching Philosophy 18 (2):101-113.
    This paper focuses on the benefits of discussing moral issues concerning the domestic realm in an introductory ethics course, especially moral issues surrounding divorce. The subject of divorce in introductory courses can illustrate to students significant dimensions in ethical theory and also serves as a useful pedagogical tool to bridge the gap between abstract ethical theories and students’ daily lives. Divorce is a common experience that allows students to personally engage with ethical questions that often have often immediate relevance to (...)
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  17.  14
    Good Eating.James B. Gould - 2014 - Teaching Ethics 14 (2):149-174.
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  18.  9
    Good Eating: Food as a Single-Topic Ethics Course.James B. Gould - 2014 - Teaching Ethics 14 (2):149-174.
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  19.  38
    Learning Community Formats.James B. Gould - 2007 - Teaching Philosophy 30 (3):309-326.
    College courses are often disconnected both from other disciplines and from student’s lives. When classes are taught in isolation from each other students experience them as unrelated fragments. In addition, college courses often lack personal meaning and relevance. Interdisciplinary learning communities—classes in which the subject matters of two or more fields are integrated—can help overcome these two problems by providing an education that is holistic and coherent. In this paper I report on how philosophy courses can be blended with English (...)
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  20.  11
    Learning Community Formats.James B. Gould - 2007 - Teaching Philosophy 30 (3):309-326.
    College courses are often disconnected both from other disciplines and from student’s lives. When classes are taught in isolation from each other students experience them as unrelated fragments. In addition, college courses often lack personal meaning and relevance. Interdisciplinary learning communities—classes in which the subject matters of two or more fields are integrated—can help overcome these two problems by providing an education that is holistic and coherent. In this paper I report on how philosophy courses can be blended with English (...)
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  21.  29
    The Grace We Are Owed: Human Rights and Divine Duties.James B. Gould - 2008 - Faith and Philosophy 25 (3):261-275.
    Traditional views of grace assert that God owes us nothing. Grace is undeserved, supererogatory and free. In this paper I argue that while this is an accurate characterization of creating grace, it is not true of saving grace. We have no right to be created as spiritual beings whose true good is found in relationship with God. But once we exist as spiritual beings, God does owe us a genuine offer of the salvation that constitutes our highest fulfillment. Creating grace (...)
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  22.  5
    Theological Reflective Equilibrium and the Moral Logic of Partnered Homosexuality in Advance.James B. Gould - forthcoming - Philosophy and Theology.
  23.  7
    Theological Reflective Equilibrium and the Moral Logic of Partnered Homosexuality.James B. Gould - 2016 - Philosophy and Theology 28 (2):409-437.