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  1. Thomistic Hylomorphism and Philosophy of Mind and Philosophy of Religion.James Madden - 2013 - Philosophy Compass 8 (7):664-676.
    Contemporary philosophers of mind tend to accept either some version of dualism or physicalism when considering the mind–body problem. Likewise, recent philosophers of religion typically assume that we must work within these two categories when considering problems related to the possibility of bodily resurrection. Recently, some philosophers have reintroduced the Thomistic version of hylomorphism. In this article, we will consider the distinctive doctrines of Thomistic hylomorphism and how they can be used to address concerns about both the mind–body problem and (...)
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  2.  85
    Charles Taliaferro, Jil Evans. The Image in Mind: Theism, Naturalism, and the Imagination. Continuum, 2011.James D. Madden - 2014 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 6 (1):203--209.
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  3.  53
    Realism, Nominalism, and Biological Naturalism.James D. Madden - 2011 - International Philosophical Quarterly 51 (1):85-102.
    Biological naturalism claims that all psychological phenomena can be causally, though not ontologically, reduced to neurological processes, where causal reduction is usually understood in terms of supervenience. After presenting John Searle’s version of biological naturalism in some detail, I argue that the particular supervenience relation on which this account depends is dubious. Specifically, the fact that either realism or nominalism is the case implies that there is one fact about belief that does not supervene on neurophysiological processes. Biological naturalism is (...)
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  4.  69
    Aristotle, Induction, and First Principles.James D. Madden - 2004 - International Philosophical Quarterly 44 (1):35-52.
    Modern Empiricists are typically troubled by the two following problems: (1) There is an epistemic gap between experience of individuals and understanding universals such that empiricist accounts of concept formation seem to beg the question. (2) There needs to be an answer to the skeptic who denies that sensory experience warrants our belief in the existence of the material substances that underlie sensible qualities. Although Aristotle’s account of induction is subject to these problems prima facie, his theory of perception, his (...)
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  5.  38
    Is a Thomistic Theory of Intentionality Consistent with Physicalism?James D. Madden - 2017 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 91 (1):1-28.
    I argue that a Thomistic theory of intentionality is both philosophically plausible and inconsistent with physicalism. I begin by distinguishing two types of intentionality and two senses in which something can be said to be non-physical. After sketching the relevant background hylomorphic philosophy of nature, I develop a Thomistic theory of intentionality that supports a certain kind of anti-physicalism. I then consider criticisms of the Thomistic theory of intentionality raised by Peter King and Robert Pasnau. In reply I argue that (...)
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  6.  18
    The Agnostic Inquirer: Revelation From a Philosophical Standpoint. [REVIEW]James D. Madden - 2011 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 85 (3):503-507.
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  7.  26
    On Determining What There Is: The Identity of Ontological Categories in Aquinas, Scotus, and Lowe. By Paul Symington.James D. Madden - 2013 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 87 (4):804 - 806.
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  8.  35
    Leibniz on Teleology and the Intelligibility of Nature.James D. Madden - 2003 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 77:173-188.
    Among the many tensions in Leibniz’s philosophical system is his tendency to invoke both mechanistic and teleological explanations. Jonathan Bennett, typicalof recent Leibniz commentators, attempts to relieve this difficulty by arguing that teleology for Leibniz is theological posturing and philosophically thin; such a doctrine does not serve to explain the relationship between teleology and mechanism. I argue that Leibniz’s appeal to final causality is both inextricably grounded in his wider metaphysic and helpful in understanding the preconditions for causality in general. (...)
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    Leibniz on Teleology and the Intelligibility of Nature.James D. Madden - 2003 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 77:173-188.
    Among the many tensions in Leibniz’s philosophical system is his tendency to invoke both mechanistic and teleological explanations. Jonathan Bennett, typicalof recent Leibniz commentators, attempts to relieve this difficulty by arguing that teleology for Leibniz is theological posturing and philosophically thin; such a doctrine does not serve to explain the relationship between teleology and mechanism. I argue that Leibniz’s appeal to final causality is both inextricably grounded in his wider metaphysic and helpful in understanding the preconditions for causality in general. (...)
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  10.  18
    Personal Agency.James D. Madden - 2010 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 84 (4):817-819.
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  11.  6
    Liebniz’s Mill: A Challenge to Materialism. [REVIEW]James D. Madden - 2012 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 86 (2):383-387.
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  12.  9
    The Knower and the Known: Physicalism, Dualism, and the Nature of Intelligibility, by Stephen Parrish.James D. Madden - 2015 - Faith and Philosophy 32 (3):355-358.
  13.  11
    Liebniz’s Mill.James D. Madden - 2012 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 86 (2):383-387.
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    Personal Agency: The Metaphysics of Mind and Action. [REVIEW]James D. Madden - 2010 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 84 (4):817-819.
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  15. Victor Cousin: Commonsense and the Absolute.James W. Manns and Edward H. Madden - 1990 - Review of Metaphysics 43 (3):569-590.
    Not only did he found his own school of philosophy, known as eclecticism, but he reintroduced into French intellectual life the study and appreciation of the history of philosophy, and produced studies and translations--of Plato and Proclus, Descartes and Pascal--that stand to this day as paradigms of exegetical thoroughness. And it was he who first pointed out to his countrymen that there was some serious philosophical work being carried out on the other side of the Rhine.
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