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  1.  9
    The Disputed Root of Salvation in Eighteenth‐Century English Deism: Thomas Chubb and Thomas Morgan Debate the Impact of the Fall.Jeffrey R. Wigelsworth - 2009 - Intellectual History Review 19 (1):29-43.
  2.  8
    A Pre-Socratic Source for John Toland's Pantheisticon.Jeffrey R. Wigelsworth - 2008 - History of European Ideas 34 (1):61-65.
    Scholars have long debated the sources John Toland used to compose Pantheisticon: or the Form of Celebrating the Socratic-Society. In contrast to suggestions that point to the mystic worldview of the Renaissance thinker Giordano Bruno or a revival of Epicurean atomism, this paper puts forth the pre-Socratic philosopher Anaxagoras as an inspiration force on Toland. This is based on Toland's known reading of Anaxagoras and the close parallels between Pantheisticon and the extant fragments of Anaxagoras.
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  3.  2
    Competing to Popularize Newtonian Philosophy.Jeffrey R. Wigelsworth - 2003 - Isis 94 (3):435-455.
  4.  11
    Samuel Clarke’s Newtonian Soul.Jeffrey R. Wigelsworth - 2009 - Journal of the History of Ideas 70 (1):45-68.
  5.  22
    “God Does Not Act Arbitrarily, or Interpose Unnecessarily:” Providential Deism and the Denial of Miracles in Wollaston, Tindal, Chubb, and Morgan.Diego Lucci & Jeffrey R. Wigelsworth - 2015 - Intellectual History Review 25 (2):167-189.
    The philosophical debate on miracles in Enlightenment England shows the composite and evolutionary character of the English Enlightenment and, more generally, of the Enlightenment’s relation to religion. In fact, that debate saw the confrontation of divergent positions within the Protestant field and led several deists and freethinkers to resolutely deny the possibility of “things above reason” (i.e. things that, according to such Protestant philosophers as Robert Boyle and John Locke, human reason can neither comprehend nor refute, and that humanity must (...)
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  6. Edward Stillingfleet’s Theological Critique of Cartesian Natural Philosophy.Jeffrey R. Wigelsworth - 2020 - History of European Ideas 46 (8):1150-1164.
    ABSTRACT In this article I examine Edward Stillingfleet’s last published work and the critique of Rene Descartes’s natural philosophy therein which appeared in 1702 as an incomplete appendix to the revised edition of his well-known Origines Sacrae to explore the depiction of God’s power that underwrote his assessment of Cartesianism mechanical philosophy and its inclination to atheism. I consider both Stillingfleet’s characterization of God’s relationship with the creation and the contextual sources he used to support it, to show that his (...)
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  7.  4
    Navigation and Newsprint: Advertising Longitude Schemes in the Public Sphere Ca. 1715.Jeffrey R. Wigelsworth - 2008 - Science in Context 21 (3):351-376.
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  8.  18
    The Freemason Who Explained Newton: Audrey T. Carpenter: John Theophilus Desaguliers: A Natural Philosopher, Engineer and Freemason in Newtonian England. London and New York: Continuum, 2011, Xvi+339pp, $39.95 PB.Jeffrey R. Wigelsworth - 2013 - Metascience 22 (1):181-184.
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  9.  5
    The Freemason Who Explained Newton: Audrey T. Carpenter: John Theophilus Desaguliers: A Natural Philosopher, Engineer and Freemason in Newtonian England. London and New York: Continuum, 2011, Xvi+ 339pp, $39.95 PB (Book Review). [REVIEW]Jeffrey R. Wigelsworth - 2013 - Metascience 22 (1):181-184.
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