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Mark A. Graber [13]Mark Aaron Graber [1]
  1.  32
    Defining the Scope of Implied Consent in the Emergency Department.Raul B. Easton, Mark A. Graber, Jay Monnahan & Jason Hughes - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (12):35 – 38.
    Purpose: To determine the relative value that patients place on consent for procedures in the emergency department (ED) and to define a set of procedures that fall in the realm of implied consent. Methods: A questionnaire was administered to a convenience sample 134 of 174 patients who were seen in the ED of a Midwestern teaching hospital. The questionnaire asked how much time they believed was necessary to give consent for various procedures. Procedures ranged from simple (venipuncture) to complex (procedural (...)
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  2.  28
    Internet-Based Crowdsourcing and Research Ethics: The Case for IRB Review.Mark A. Graber & Abraham Graber - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (2):115-118.
    The recent success of Foldit in determining the structure of the Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (M-PMV) retroviral protease is suggestive of the power-solving potential of internet-facilitated game-like crowdsourcing. This research model is highly novel, however, and thus, deserves careful consideration of potential ethical issues. In this paper, we will demonstrate that the crowdsourcing model of research has the potential to cause harm to participants, manipulates the participant into continued participation, and uses participants as experimental subjects. We conclude that protocols relying on (...)
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  3.  14
    Empathy is a Poor Foundation on Which to Base Legislative Medical Policy.Mark A. Graber & John W. Ely - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (7):402-404.
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  4.  40
    Wetware, Game Theory, and the Golden Rule.Abraham D. Graber & Mark A. Graber - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (5):30 – 31.
  5.  26
    Book ReviewKeith E. Whittington, Constitutional Interpretation: Textual Meaning, Original Intent, and Judicial Review. Lawrence: University of Kansas Press, 1999. Pp. Xvi + 304. $39.95. [REVIEW]Mark A. Graber - 2001 - Ethics 111 (3):658-659.
  6.  22
    Black, White or Green: 'Race', Gender and Avatars Within the Therapeutic Space.Mark A. Graber & Abraham D. Graber - 2011 - Medical Humanities 37 (1):9-12.
    Personal identity is critical to provider–patient interactions. Patients and doctors tend to self-select, ideally forming therapeutic units that maximise the patients' benefit. Recently, however, ‘reality’ has changed. The internet and virtual worlds such as Second Life allow models of identity and provider–patient interactions that go beyond the limits of mainstream personal identity. In this paper some of the ethical implications of virtual patient–provider interactions, especially those that have to do with personal identity, are explored.
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  7.  24
    Constitutional Fits.Mark A. Graber - 2010 - Journal of Social Philosophy 41 (2):194-201.
  8. Marbury Versus Madison Documents and Commentary.Mark A. Graber & Michael Perhac - 2002
  9.  11
    The Collapse of the New Deal Conceptual Universe: The Schmooze Project.Mark A. Graber - unknown
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  10. Transforming Free Speech: The Ambiguous Legacy of Civil Libertarianism.Mark A. Graber - 1991 - University of California Press.
    Contemporary civil libertarians claim that their works preserve a worthy American tradition of defending free-speech rights dating back to the framing of the First Amendment. _Transforming Free Speech_ challenges the worthiness, and indeed the very existence of one uninterrupted libertarian tradition. Mark A. Graber asserts that in the past, broader political visions inspired libertarian interpretations of the First Amendment. In reexamining the philosophical and jurisprudential foundations of the defense of expression rights from the Civil War to the present, he exposes (...)
     
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  11. Transforming Free Speech: The Ambiguous Legacy of Civil Libertarianism.Mark A. Graber - 1991 - University of California Press.
    Contemporary civil libertarians claim that their works preserve a worthy American tradition of defending free-speech rights dating back to the framing of the First Amendment. _Transforming Free Speech_ challenges the worthiness, and indeed the very existence of one uninterrupted libertarian tradition. Mark A. Graber asserts that in the past, broader political visions inspired libertarian interpretations of the First Amendment. In reexamining the philosophical and jurisprudential foundations of the defense of expression rights from the Civil War to the present, he exposes (...)
     
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  12.  7
    The Wizard Behind the Curtain: Programmers as Providers.Mark A. Graber & Olivia Bailey - 2016 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 11:4.
    It is almost universally accepted that traditional provider-patient relationships should be governed, at least in part, by the ethical principles set forth by Beauchamp and Childress. These principles include autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence and justice. Recently, however, the nature of medial practice has changed. The pervasive presence of computer technology in medicine raises interesting ethical questions. In this paper we argue that some software designers should be considered health care providers and thus be subject the ethical principles incumbent upon “traditional” providers. (...)
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  13.  21
    Stephen M. Griffin, American Constitutionalism: From Theory to Politics:American Constitutionalism: From Theory to Politics.Mark A. Graber - 1998 - Ethics 108 (2):433-435.