15 found
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  1.  30
    Sound Symbolism Facilitates Early Verb Learning.Mutsumi Imai, Sotaro Kita, Miho Nagumo & Hiroyuki Okada - 2008 - Cognition 109 (1):54-65.
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  2.  68
    Japanese Sound-Symbolism Facilitates Word Learning in English-Speaking Children.Katerina Kantartzis, Mutsumi Imai & Sotaro Kita - 2011 - Cognitive Science 35 (3):575-586.
    Sound-symbolism is the nonarbitrary link between the sound and meaning of a word. Japanese-speaking children performed better in a verb generalization task when they were taught novel sound-symbolic verbs, created based on existing Japanese sound-symbolic words, than novel nonsound-symbolic verbs (Imai, Kita, Nagumo, & Okada, 2008). A question remained as to whether the Japanese children had picked up regularities in the Japanese sound-symbolic lexicon or were sensitive to universal sound-symbolism. The present study aimed to provide support for the latter. In (...)
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  3.  46
    A Cross-Linguistic Study of Early Word Meaning: Universal Ontology and Linguistic Influence.Mutsumi Imai & Dedre Gentner - 1997 - Cognition 62 (2):169-200.
  4.  6
    Scope of Linguistic Influence: Does a Classifier System Alter Object Concepts?Henrik Saalbach & Mutsumi Imai - 2007 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 136 (3):485-501.
  5.  25
    Word Learning Does Not End at Fast-Mapping: Evolution of Verb Meanings Through Reorganization of an Entire Semantic Domain.Noburo Saji, Mutsumi Imai, Henrik Saalbach, Yuping Zhang, Hua Shu & Hiroyuki Okada - 2011 - Cognition 118 (1):45-61.
  6.  23
    Who is Crossing Where? Infants’ Discrimination of Figures and Grounds in Events.Tilbe Göksun, Kathy Hirsh-Pasek, Roberta Michnick Golinkoff, Mutsumi Imai, Haruka Konishi & Hiroyuki Okada - 2011 - Cognition 121 (2):176-195.
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  7.  75
    All Giraffes Have Female‐Specific Properties: Influence of Grammatical Gender on Deductive Reasoning About Sex‐Specific Properties in German Speakers.Mutsumi Imai, Lennart Schalk, Henrik Saalbach & Hiroyuki Okada - 2014 - Cognitive Science 38 (3):514-536.
    Grammatical gender is independent of biological sex for the majority of animal names (e.g., any giraffe, be it male or female, is grammatically treated as feminine). However, there is apparent semantic motivation for grammatical gender classes, especially in mapping human terms to gender. This research investigated whether this motivation affects deductive inference in native German speakers. We compared German with Japanese speakers (a language without grammatical gender) when making inferences about sex-specific biological properties. We found that German speakers tended to (...)
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  8.  8
    A Developmental Shift From Similar to Language-Specific Strategies in Verb Acquisition: A Comparison of English, Spanish, and Japanese.Mandy J. Maguire, Kathy Hirsh-Pasek, Roberta Michnick Golinkoff, Mutsumi Imai, Etsuko Haryu, Sandra Vanegas, Hiroyuki Okada, Rachel Pulverman & Brenda Sanchez-Davis - 2010 - Cognition 114 (3):299-319.
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  9.  17
    Are Chinese and German Children Taxonomic, Thematic, or Shape Biased? Influence of Classifiers and Cultural Contexts.Mutsumi Imai, Henrik Saalbach & Elsbeth Stern - 2010 - Frontier in Psychology 1.
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  10.  12
    On the Equivalence of Superordinate Concepts.Edward J. Wisniewski, Mutsumi Imai & Lyman Casey - 1996 - Cognition 60 (3):269-298.
  11.  16
    Language‐Relative Construal of Individuation Constrained by Universal Ontology: Revisiting Language Universals and Linguistic Relativity.Mutsumi Imai & Reiko Mazuka - 2007 - Cognitive Science 31 (3):385-413.
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  12.  83
    Grammatical Gender and Inferences About Biological Properties in German-Speaking Children.Henrik Saalbach, Mutsumi Imai & Lennart Schalk - 2012 - Cognitive Science 36 (7):1251-1267.
    In German, nouns are assigned to one of the three gender classes. For most animal names, however, the assignment is independent of the referent’s biological sex. We examined whether German-speaking children understand this independence of grammar from semantics or whether they assume that grammatical gender is mapped onto biological sex when drawing inferences about sex-specific biological properties of animals. Two cross-linguistic studies comparing German-speaking and Japanese-speaking preschoolers were conducted. The results suggest that German-speaking children utilize grammatical gender as a cue (...)
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  13.  4
    Language-Relative Construal of Individuation Constrained by Universal Ontology: Revisiting Language Universals and Linguistic Relativity.Mutsumi Imai & Reiko Mazuka - 2007 - Cognitive Science 31 (3):385-414.
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  14.  22
    Influence of Grammatical Gender on Deductive Reasoning About Sex-Specific Properties of Animals.Mutsumi Imai, Lennart Schalk, Henrik Saalbach & Hiroyuki Okada - 2010 - In S. Ohlsson & R. Catrambone (eds.), Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Cognitive Science Society.
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  15.  22
    Re-Evaluating Linguistic Relativity: Language-Specific Categories and the Role of Universal Ontological Knowledge in the Construal of Individuation.Mutsumi Imai & Reiko Mazuka - 2003 - In Dedre Getner & Susan Goldin-Meadow (eds.), Language in Mind: Advances in the Study of Language and Thought. MIT Press. pp. 429--464.