16 found
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  1.  21
    Primate Handedness Reconsidered.Peter F. MacNeilage, Michael G. Studdert-Kennedy & Bjorn Lindblom - 1987 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 10 (2):247-263.
  2.  3
    Motor Control of Serial Ordering of Speech.Peter F. MacNeilage - 1970 - Psychological Review 77 (3):182-196.
  3.  55
    The Frame/Content Theory of Evolution of Speech Production.Peter F. MacNeilage - 1998 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (4):499-511.
    The species-specific organizational property of speech is a continual mouth open-close alternation, the two phases of which are subject to continual articulatory modulation. The cycle constitutes the syllable, and the open and closed phases are segments framescontent displays that are prominent in many nonhuman primates. The new role of Broca's area and its surround in human vocal communication may have derived from its evolutionary history as the main cortical center for the control of ingestive processes. The frame and content components (...)
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  4.  12
    Primate Handedness: A Foot in the Door.Peter F. MacNeilage, Michael G. Studdert-Kennedy & Bjorn Lindblom - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (4):737-746.
  5.  12
    The Frame/Content Theory of Evolution of Speech: A Comparison with a Gestural-Origins Alternative.Peter F. MacNeilage & Barbara L. Davis - 2005 - Interaction Studies 6 (2):173-199.
  6.  44
    Baby Talk and the Emergence of First Words.Peter F. MacNeilage & Barbara L. Davis - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (4):517-518.
    Words denoting “mother” in baby talk and in languages usually include nasal sounds, supporting Falk's suggestion that infant nasalized demand vocalizations might have motivated a first word. The linguistic contrast between maternal terms and paternal terms, which favor oral consonants, and the simple phonetic patterns of parental terms in both baby talk and languages also suggest parental terms could have been first words.
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  7.  2
    The Frame/Content Theory of Evolution of Speech: A Comparison with a Gestural-Origins Alternative.Peter F. MacNeilage & Barbara L. Davis - 2005 - Interaction Studies: Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systems 6 (2):173-199.
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  8.  11
    Evolutionary Sleight of Hand: Then, They Saw It; Now We Don't.Peter F. MacNeilage & Barbara L. Davis - 2005 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (2):137-138.
    Arbib's gestural-origins theory does not tell us why or how a subsequent switch to vocal language occurred, and shows no systematic concern with the signalling affordances or constraints of either medium. Our frame/content theory, in contrast, offers both a vocal origin in the invention of kinship terms in a baby-talk context and an explanation for the structure of the currently favored medium.
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  9.  18
    Linguistic and Manual Evolution.Peter F. MacNeilage - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):568-570.
  10.  37
    Message and Medium: Lowly and Action-Related Origins.Peter F. MacNeilage & Barbara L. Davis - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (3):296-297.
    Hurford presents a much-needed lowly origins scenario for the evolution of conceptual precursors to lexical items. But more is still needed on action, regarding both the message level of lexical concepts and the medium. We summarize our complementary action-based lowly origins (frame/content) scenario for the vocal auditory medium of language, which, like Hurford's scenario, is anchored in a phylogenetically old neurological dichotomy.
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  11.  16
    Mouth to Hand and Back Again? Could Language Have Made Those Journeys?Peter F. MacNeilage - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (2):233-234.
    Corballis argues that language underwent two modality switches – from vocal to manual, then back to vocal. Speech has evolved a frame/content mode of organization whereby consonants and vowels (content) are placed into a syllable structure of frames (MacNeilage 1998). No homologue to this mode is present in sign language, raising doubt as to whether the proposed modality switches could have occurred.
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  12.  19
    Primate Handedness: The Other Theory, the Other Hand and the Other Attitude.Peter F. MacNeilage, Michael G. Studdert-Kennedy & Bjorn Lindblom - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (2):344-349.
  13.  19
    Primate Predatory, Postural, and Prehensile Proclivities and Professional Peer Pressures: Postscripts.Peter F. MacNeilage, Michael G. Studdert-Kennedy & Bjorn Lindblom - 1987 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 10 (2):289-303.
  14.  7
    The Explanation of “Mama”.Peter F. MacNeilage - 2000 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (3):440-440.
    Joseph apparently does not understand the main purpose of my target article and how different it is from any purpose underlying his work. In addition, most of the neurological ideas of the target article for which he claims unacknowledged priority are not original to him, but instead predate the work of both of us.
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  15. The Frame/Content Theory of Evolution of Speech.Peter F. MacNeilage & Barbara L. Davis - 2005 - Interaction Studies. Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies / Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies 6 (2):173-199.
    The Frame/Content theory deals with how and why the first language evolved the present-day speech mode of programming syllable “Frame” structures with segmental “Content” elements. The first words are considered, for biomechanical reasons, to have had the simple syllable frame structures of pre-speech babbling, and were perhaps parental terms, generated within the parent–infant dyad. Although all gestural origins theories have iconicity as a plausible alternative hypothesis for the origin of the meaning-signal link for words, they all share the problems of (...)
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  16.  29
    The Frame/Content View of Speech: What Survives, What Emerges.Peter F. MacNeilage - 1998 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (4):532-538.
    There was little disagreement among commentators about whether speech production involves a frame/content mode of organization, but there was some disagreement with the contention that frames evolved from ingestive cyclicities and were mediated via a medial “intrinsic” system.
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