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R. Hans Phaf [9]R. H. Phaf [4]
  1.  9
    Approach, Avoidance, and Affect: A Meta-Analysis of Approach-Avoidance Tendencies in Manual Reaction Time Tasks.R. Hans Phaf, Sören E. Mohr, Mark Rotteveel & Jelte M. Wicherts - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  2. A Constructivist and Connectionist View on Conscious and Nonconscious Processes.R. H. Phaf & G. Wolters - 1997 - Philosophical Psychology 10 (3):287-307.
    Recent experimental findings reveal dissociations of conscious and nonconscious performance in many fields of psychological research, suggesting that conscious and nonconscious effects result from qualitatively different processes. A connectionist view of these processes is put forward in which consciousness is the consequence of construction processes taking place in three types of working memory in a specific type of recurrent neural network. The recurrences arise by feeding back output to the input of a central (representational) network. They are assumed to be (...)
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  3. Stronger Suboptimal Than Optimal Affective Priming.M. Rotteveel & R. H. Phaf - 2000 - Consciousness and Cognition 9 (2):S66 - S67.
  4.  8
    Mere Exposure in Reverse: Mood and Motion Modulate Memory Bias.Mark Rotteveel & R. Hans Phaf - 2007 - Cognition and Emotion 21 (6):1323-1346.
    Mere exposure, generally, entails influences of familiarity manipulations on affective dependent variables. Previously (Phaf & Rotteveel, 2005), we have argued that familiarity corresponds intrinsically to positive affect, and have extended the correspondence to novelty and negative affect. Here, we present two experiments that show reverse effects of affective manipulations on perceived familiarity. In Experiment 1 affectively valenced exteroceptive cues of approach and avoidance (e.g., apparent movement) modulated recognition bias of neutral targets. This finding suggests that our correspondence hypotheses can be (...)
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  5.  9
    Gamma Flicker Elicits Positive Affect Without Awareness.Bram T. Heerebout, A. E. Yoram Tap, Mark Rotteveel & R. Hans Phaf - 2013 - Consciousness and Cognition 22 (1):281-289.
    High-frequency oscillations emerged as a neural code for both positive affect and fluent attentional processing from evolutionary simulations with artificial neural networks. Visual 50 Hz flicker, which entrains neural oscillations in the gamma band, has been shown to foster attentional switching, but can it also elicit positive affect? A three-faces display was preceded by a 50, 25, or 0 Hz flicker on the position of the odd-one-out . Participants decided on the gender or on the subjective valence of this neutral (...)
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  6.  4
    Competition Elicits Arousal and Affect.R. Hans Phaf - 2016 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 39.
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  7.  36
    Contrasts and Dissociations Suggest Qualitative Differences Between Conscious and Unconscious Processes.Gezinus Wolters & R. Hans Phaf - 2002 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (3):359-360.
    The authors reject a computationally powerful unconscious. Instead, they suggest that simple unconscious processes give rise to complex conscious representations. We discuss evidence showing contrastive effects of conscious and unconscious processes, suggesting a distinction between these types of processes. In our view, conscious processes often serve to correct or control negative consequences of relatively simple unconscious processes.
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  8.  16
    Frequency and Motivational State: Evolutionary Simulations Suggest an Adaptive Function for Network Oscillations.Bram T. Heerebout & R. Hans Phaf - 2009 - In N. A. Taatgen & H. van Rijn (eds.), Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society.
  9.  33
    Analysis of a Computer Model of Emotions.D. Moffat, N. H. Frijda & R. H. Phaf - 1993 - In [Book Chapter].
    In the fields of psychology, AI, and philosophy there has recently been theoretical activity in the cognitively-based modelling of emotions. Using AI methodology it is possible to implement and test these complex models, and in this paper we examine an emotion model called ACRES. We propose a set of requirements any such model should satisfy, and compare ACRES against them. Then, analysing its behaviour in detail, we formulate more requirements and criteria that can be applied to future computational models of (...)
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  10.  13
    Constructing Consciousness.Gezinus Wolters & R. Hans Phaf - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (1):174-174.
    O'Brien & Opie make unnecessary distinctions between vehicle and process theories and neglect empirically based distinctions between conscious and unconscious processing. We argue that phenomenal experience emerges, not just as a byproduct of input-driven parallel distributed processing, but as a result of constructive processing in recurrent neural networks. Stable network states may be necessary, but are not sufficient, for consciousness.
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  11. Prospects for Artificail Intelligence. Proceedings of AISB 93, Birmingham.D. Moffat, N. H. Frijda & R. H. Phaf - 1993
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  12. A Competitive Manifesto.R. Hans Phaf & Gezinus Wolters - 2000 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (4):487-488.
    The distinction made by Page between localist and distributed representations seems confounded by the distinction between competitive and associative learning. His manifesto can also be read as a plea for competitive learning. The power of competitive models can even be extended further, by simulating similarity effects in forced-choice perceptual identification (Ratcliff & McKoon 1997) that have defied explanation by most memory models.
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  13. Katja Valli, Antti Revonsuo, Outi Pälkäs, Kamaran Hassan Ismahil, Karsan Jelal Ali, and Raija-Leena Punamäki. The.Gayle B. Speck, Kieron P. OÕConnor, Frederick Aardema, Walter J. Perrig, Doris Eckstein, Berenice Valdes Conroy, A. Catena, P. Marı-Beffa, Michiel B. de Ruiter & R. Hans Phaf - 2004 - Consciousness and Cognition 13:655.
     
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