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Randy K. Chiu [5]Randy Chiu [3]
  1. Income, Money Ethic, Pay Satisfaction, Commitment, and Unethical Behavior: Is the Love of Money the Root of Evil for Hong Kong Employees? [REVIEW]Thomas Li-Ping Tang & Randy K. Chiu - 2003 - Journal of Business Ethics 46 (1):13 - 30.
    This study examines a model involving income, the love of money, pay satisfaction, organizational commitment, job changes, and unethical behavior among 211 full-time employees in Hong Kong, China. Direct paths suggested that the love of money was related to unethical behavior, but income (money) was not. Indirect paths showed that income was negatively related to the love of money that, in turn, was negatively related to pay satisfaction that, in turn, was negatively associated with unethical behavior. Pay satisfaction was positively (...)
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  2. Ethical Judgment and Whistleblowing Intention: Examining the Moderating Role of Locus of Control. [REVIEW]Randy K. Chiu - 2003 - Journal of Business Ethics 43 (1-2):65-74.
    The growing body of whistleblowing literature includes many studies that have attempted to identify the individual level antecedents of whistleblowing behavior. However, cross-cultural differences in perceptions of the ethicality of whistleblowing affect the judgment of whistleblowing intention. This study ascertains how Chinese managers/professionals decide to blow the whistle in terms of their locus of control and subjective judgment regarding the intention of whistleblowing. Hypotheses that are derived from these speculations are tested with data on Chinese managers and professionals. Statistical analysis (...)
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  3.  40
    CEO Ethical Leadership and Corporate Social Responsibility: A Moderated Mediation Model.Long-Zeng Wu, Ho Kwong Kwan, Frederick Hong-kit Yim, Randy K. Chiu & Xiaogang He - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 130 (4):819-831.
    This study examined the relationship between CEO ethical leadership and corporate social responsibility by focusing on the mediating role of organizational ethical culture and the moderating role of managerial discretion. Based on a sample of 242 domestic Chinese firms, we found that CEO ethical leadership positively influences corporate social responsibility via organizational ethical culture. In addition, moderated path analysis indicated that CEO founder status strengthens while firm size weakens the direct effect of CEO ethical leadership on organizational ethical culture and (...)
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  4. Monetary Intelligence and Behavioral Economics: The Enron Effect—Love of Money, Corporate Ethical Values, Corruption Perceptions Index , and Dishonesty Across 31 Geopolitical Entities.Modupe Adewuyi, Bolanle Adetoun, Ningyu Tang, Jingqiu Chen, Anna Manganelli, Luigina Canova, Martina Trontelj, Caroline Urbain, Theresa Tang, Allen Stembridge, Petar Skobic, Elisaveta Sardžoska, Marko Polic, Horia Pitariu, Ruja Pholsward, Francisco Pereira, Mehmet Özbek, AAhad Osman-Gani, Johnsto Osagie, Anthony Nnedum, Richard Mpoyi, Alice Moreira, Eva Malovics, Jian Liang, Kilsun Kim, Ali Kazem, Chin-Kang Jen, Abdul Ibrahim, Consuelo Garcia de la Torre, Linzhi Du, Rosario Correia, Bor-Shiuan Cheng, Mark Borg, Abdulgawi Al-Zubaidi, Michael Allen, Adebowale Akande, Peter Vlerick, Roberto Luna-Arocas, Brigitte Charles-Pauvers, Randy Chiu, Ilya Garber, Fernando Arias-Galicia, Thompson Teo, Vivien Lim, Mahfooz Ansari, Toto Sutarso & Thomas Tang - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 148 (4):919-937.
    Monetary intelligence theory asserts that individuals apply their money attitude to frame critical concerns in the context and strategically select certain options to achieve financial goals and ultimate happiness. This study explores the dark side of monetary Intelligence and behavioral economics—dishonesty. Dishonesty, a risky prospect, involves cost–benefit analysis of self-interest. We frame good or bad barrels in the environmental context as a proxy of high or low probability of getting caught for dishonesty, respectively. We theorize: The magnitude and intensity of (...)
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  5. Decision-Making Process of Internal Whistleblowing Behavior in China: Empirical Evidence and Implications.Julia Zhang, Randy Chiu & Liqun Wei - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 88 (S1):25-41.
    In response to the lack of empirical studies examining the internal disclosure behavior in the Chinese context, this study tested a whistleblowing -decision-making process among employees in the Chinese banking industry. For would-be whistleblowers, positive affect and organizational ethical culture were hypothesized to enhance the expected efficacy of their whistleblowing intention, by providing collective norms concerning legitimate, management-sanctioned behavior. Questionnaire surveys were collected from 364 employees in 10 banks in the Hangzhou City, China. By and large, the findings supported the (...)
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  6.  26
    Work–Family Spillover and Crossover Effects of Sexual Harassment: The Moderating Role of Work–Home Segmentation Preference.Jie Xin, Shouming Chen, Ho Kwong Kwan, Randy K. Chiu & Frederick Hong-kit Yim - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 147 (3):619-629.
    This study examined the relationship between workplace sexual harassment as perceived by female employees and the family satisfaction of their husbands. It also considered the mediating roles of employees’ job tension and work-to-family conflict and the moderating role of employees’ work–home segmentation preference in this relationship. The results, based on data from 210 Chinese employee–spouse dyads collected at four time points, indicated that employees’ perceptions of sexual harassment were positively related to their job tension, which in turn increased WFC. Moreover, (...)
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  7.  90
    Monetary Intelligence and Behavioral Economics Across 32 Cultures: Good Apples Enjoy Good Quality of Life in Good Barrels.Ningyu Tang, Jingqiu Chen, Martina Trontelj, Caroline Urbain, Theresa Tang, Allen Stembridge, Petar Skobic, Elisaveta Sardžoska, Marko Polic, Horia Pitariu, Ruja Pholsward, Francisco Pereira, Mehmet Özbek, AAhad Osman-Gani, Johnsto Osagie, Anthony Nnedum, Richard Mpoyi, Alice Moreira, Anna Manganelli, Eva Malovics, Jian Liang, Kilsun Kim, Ali Kazem, Chin-Kang Jen, Abdul Ibrahim, Consuelo Garcia de la Torre, Linzhi Du, Rosario Correia, Bor-Shiuan Cheng, Luigina Canova, Mark Borg, Abdulgawi Al-Zubaidi, Michael Allen, Adebowale Akande, Peter Vlerick, Roberto Luna-Arocas, Brigitte Charles-Pauvers, Randy Chiu, Ilya Garber, Fernando Arias-Galicia, Thompson Teo, Vivien Lim, Mahfooz Ansari, Toto Sutarso & Thomas Tang - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 148 (4):893-917.
    Monetary Intelligence theory asserts that individuals apply their money attitude to frame critical concerns in the context and strategically select certain options to achieve financial goals and ultimate happiness. This study explores the bright side of Monetary Intelligence and behavioral economics, frames money attitude in the context of pay and life satisfaction, and controls money at the macro-level and micro-level. We theorize: Managers with low love of money motive but high stewardship behavior will have high subjective well-being: pay satisfaction and (...)
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    Hostile Attribution Bias and Negative Reciprocity Beliefs Exacerbate Incivility’s Effects on Interpersonal Deviance.Long-Zeng Wu, Haina Zhang, Randy K. Chiu, Ho Kwong Kwan & Xiaogang He - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 120 (2):189-199.
    The purpose of this study was to examine the moderating roles of hostile attribution bias and negative reciprocity beliefs in the relationship between workplace incivility, as perceived by employees, and their interpersonal deviance. Data were collected using a three-wave survey research design. Participants included 233 employees from a large manufacturing company in China. Hierarchical regression analyses were used to test the hypothesized relationships. Our study revealed that hostile attribution bias and negative reciprocity beliefs strengthened the positive relationship between workplace incivility (...)
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