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Eran Klein [5]Eran Patrick Klein [1]
  1.  6
    Eran Klein (forthcoming). Informed Consent in Implantable BCI Research: Identifying Risks and Exploring Meaning. Science and Engineering Ethics:1-19.
    Implantable brain–computer interface technology is an expanding area of engineering research now moving into clinical application. Ensuring meaningful informed consent in implantable BCI research is an ethical imperative. The emerging and rapidly evolving nature of implantable BCI research makes identification of risks, a critical component of informed consent, a challenge. In this paper, 6 core risk domains relevant to implantable BCI research are identified—short and long term safety, cognitive and communicative impairment, inappropriate expectations, involuntariness, affective impairment, and privacy and security. (...)
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  2.  6
    Eran Klein (2009). Skills, Dementia, and Bridging Divides in Neuroscience. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (9):20-21.
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  3.  3
    Eran Klein, Tim Brown, Matthew Sample, Anjali R. Truitt & Sara Goering (2015). Engineering the Brain: Ethical Issues and the Introduction of Neural Devices. Hastings Center Report 45 (6):26-35.
    Neural engineering technologies such as implanted deep brain stimulators and brain-computer interfaces represent exciting and potentially transformative tools for improving human health and well-being. Yet their current use and future prospects raise a variety of ethical and philosophical concerns. Devices that alter brain function invite us to think deeply about a range of ethical concerns—identity, normality, authority, responsibility, privacy, and justice. If a device is stimulating my brain while I decide upon an action, am I still the author of the (...)
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  4.  21
    Eran Klein (2011). Is There a Need for Clinical Neuroskepticism? Neuroethics 4 (3):251-259.
    Clinical neuroethics and neuroskepticism are recent entrants to the vocabulary of neuroethics. Clinical neuroethics has been used to distinguish problems of clinical relevance arising from developments in brain science from problems arising in neuroscience research proper. Neuroskepticism has been proposed as a counterweight to claims about the value and likely implications of developments in neuroscience. These two emergent streams of thought intersect within the practice of neurology. Neurologists face many traditional problems in bioethics, like end of life care in the (...)
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  5.  5
    Eran Klein (2012). Redefining the Clinical Relationship in the Era of Incentives. American Journal of Bioethics 12 (2):26-27.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 2, Page 26-27, February 2012.
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