Search results for 'Human geography Methodology' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Paul J. Cloke (ed.) (2004). Practising Human Geography. Sage.score: 447.0
    Practising Human Geography is critical introduction to disciplinary debates about the practise of human geography, that is informed by an inquiry into how geographers actually do research. In examining those methods and practices that are integral to doing geography, the text presents a theoretically-informed reflection on the construction and interpretation of geographical data - including factual and ‘fictional’ sources; the use of core research methodologies; and the interpretative role of the researcher. Framed by an historical (...)
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  2. Iain Hay (ed.) (2000). Qualitative Research Methods in Human Geography. Oxford University Press.score: 432.0
    This volume provides concise and accessible guidance on how to conduct qualitative research in human geography. It gives particular emphasis to examples drawn from social/cultural geography, perhaps the most vibrant area of inquiry in human geography over the past decade.
     
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  3. Benno Werlen (1993). Society Action and Space: An Alternative Human Geography. Routledge.score: 426.0
    What is space? And why are questions of space important to social theory? Society, Action and Space is the first English translation of a book which has been widely recognized in Europe as a major contribution to the interface between geography and social theory. Benno Werlen focuses on the issues which are at the heart of the most important debates in human and social geography today. One of the most significant recent developments in social analysis has been (...)
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  4. Keith Hoggart (2002). Researching Human Geography. Co-Published in the U.S.A. By Oxford University Press.score: 393.0
    This new text offers something different from the many "methods books" available. It presents the vast array of research methodologies available to those undertaking research on the topic, illustrating the principles, strengths, and weaknesses of all approaches. The book also demonstrates how individual philosophical approaches to research impose different preferences for research methodologies.
     
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  5. John Eyles & David Marshall Smith (eds.) (1988). Qualitative Methods in Human Geography. Barnes & Noble.score: 390.0
     
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  6. R. J. Johnston (1991). A Question of Place: Exploring the Practice of Human Geography. Blackwell.score: 390.0
     
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  7. Michael Chisholm (1975). Human Geography: Evolution or Revolution? Penguin.score: 390.0
  8. Derek Gregory & Rex Walford (eds.) (1989). Horizons in Human Geography. Barnes & Noble Books.score: 390.0
     
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  9. Audrey Lynn Kobayashi & Suzanne Mackenzie (eds.) (1989). Remaking Human Geography. Unwin Hyman.score: 390.0
     
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  10. David Mercer (1977). Conflict and Consensus in Human Geography. Dept. Of Geography, Monash University.score: 390.0
     
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  11. D. J. Walmsley (1984/1986). Human Geography: Behavioural Approaches. Wiley.score: 390.0
     
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  12. Pamela Shurmer-Smith (ed.) (2002). Doing Cultural Geography. Sage.score: 312.0
    DOING CULTURAL GEOGRAPHY Edited by PAMELA SHURMER-SMITH, University of Portsmouth Doing Cultural Geography is an introduction to cultural geography that integrates theoretical discussion with applied examples: the emphasis throughout is on doing geography. Recognising that many undergraduates have difficulty with both theory and methods courses, the text explains the theory informing cultural geography and encourages students to engage directly with theory in practice. It emphasises what can be done with humanist, Marxist, poststructuralist, feminist, and postcolonial (...)
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  13. Dydia DeLyser (ed.) (2010). The Sage Handbook of Qualitative Geography. Sage.score: 225.0
    The process of learning qualitative research has altered dramatically and this Handbook explores the growth, change, and complexity within the topic and looks ...
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  14. Seamus Grimes & Jaime Nubiola (1997). Reconsidering the Exclusion of Metaphysics in Human Geography. Acta Philosophica 6 (2):265-276.score: 224.0
    From the time of Descartes a strong tendency emerged to exclude the consideration of metaphysical questions as a necessary step towards developing truly scientific disciplines. Within human geography, positivism had a significant influence in moulding the discipline as "spatial science", resulting in a reductionist vision of humanity. Since the 1970s, in reaction to the limitations of this narrow vision and also to the deterministic perspective of marxism, humanistic approaches became important, but have failed to adequately deal with the (...)
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  15. Paul J. Cloke & R. J. Johnston (eds.) (2005). Spaces of Geographical Thought: Deconstructing Human Geography's Binaries. Sage Publications.score: 224.0
    Spaces of Geographical Thought examines key ideas – like space and place - which inform the geographic imagination. The text: discusses the core conceptual vocabulary of human geography: agency: structure; state: society; culture: economy; space: place; black: white; man: woman; nature: culture; local: global; and time: space; explains the significance of these binaries in the constitution of geographic thought; and shows how many of these binaries have been interrogated and re-imagined in more recent geographical thinking. A consideration of (...)
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  16. Arild Holt-Jensen (1999). Geography, History and Concepts: A Student's Guide. Sage Publications.score: 216.0
    Totally revised and updated, written especially for students, the third edition of Geography – History and Concepts is the definitive undergraduate introduction to the history, philosophy and methodology of Human Geography. Accessible and comprehensive, the work comprises five sections: - What is Geography?: a historical overview of the discipline and an explanation of its organization - The Foundations of Geography: examines Geography from Antiquity to the early modern period; the discussion includes detailed explanations (...)
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  17. Robert Mugerauer (1995). Interpreting Environments: Tradition, Deconstruction, Hermeneutics. University of Texas Press.score: 216.0
    Mugerauer seeks to make deconstruction and hermeneutics accessible to people in the environmental disciplines, including architecture, planning, urban studies, environmental studies, and cultural geography. Mugerauer demonstrates each methodology through a case study. The first study uses the traditional approach to recover the meaning of Jung's and Wittgenstein's houses by analyzing their historical, intentional contexts. The second case study utilizes deconstruction to explore Egyptian, French neoclassical, and postmodern attempts to use pyramids to constitute a sense of lasting presence. And (...)
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  18. P. W. Daniels (ed.) (2001). Human Geography: Issues for the 21st Century. Prentice Hall.score: 202.0
    Machine generated contents note: SECTION 1 THE WORLD BEFORE GLOBALIZATION: CHANGING -- SCALES OF EXPERIENCE Edited by Denis Shaw -- Chapter 1 Pre-capitalist worlds Denis Shaw -- Chapter 2 The rise and spread of capitalism Terry Slater -- Chapter 3 The making of the twentieth-century world Denis Shaw -- SECTION 2 SOCIETY, SETTLEMENT AND CULTURE Edited by Denis Shaw -- Chapter 4 Cities Allan Cochrane -- Chapter 5 Rural alternatives Ian Bowler -- Chapter 6 Geography, culture and global change (...)
     
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  19. J. Pickles (1985). Phenomenology, Science, and Geography: Spatiality and the Human Sciences. Cambridge University Press.score: 200.0
    A work of outstanding originality and importance, which will become a cornerstone in the philosophy of geography, this book asks: What is human science? Is a truly human science of geography possible? What notions of spatiality adequately describe human spatial experience and behaviour? It sets out to answer these questions through a discussion of the nature of science in the human sciences, and, specifically, of the role of phenomenology in such inquiry. It criticises established (...)
     
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  20. M. G. Bradford (1977). Human Geography: Theories and Their Applications. Oxford University Press.score: 196.0
     
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  21. Michael Chisholm (1971). Research in Human Geography. London,Heinemann Educational.score: 196.0
     
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  22. R. J. Johnston (1986). Philosophy and Human Geography: An Introduction to Contemporary Approaches. E. Arnold.score: 196.0
     
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  23. Vadim V. Vasilyev (2013). Hume's Methodology and the Science of Human Nature. History of Philosophy Yearbook 2012:62-115.score: 192.0
    In this paper I try to explain a strange omission in Hume’s methodological descriptions in his first Enquiry. In the course of this explanation I reveal a kind of rationalistic tendency of the latter work. It seems to contrast with “experimental method” of his early Treatise of Human Nature, but, as I show that there is no discrepancy between the actual methods of both works, I make an attempt to explain the change in Hume’s characterization of his own methods. (...)
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  24. Kōnstantinos Apostolou Doxiadēs (1972). The Method for the Study of the Ancient Greek Settlements. [Athens]Athens Center of Ekistics.score: 180.0
     
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  25. Peter Haggett (1977). Locational Methods. Wiley.score: 180.0
     
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  26. Daniel Dorling (1997). Mapping: Ways of Representing the World. Longman.score: 174.0
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  27. Mílton Santos (2012). Metamorfoses Do Espaço Habitado: Fundamentos Teóricos E Metodológicos da Geografia. Edusp.score: 174.0
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  28. Derek Gregory (1989). Areal Differentiation and Post-Modern Human Geography. In Derek Gregory & Rex Walford (eds.), Horizons in Human Geography. Barnes & Noble Books. 67--96.score: 168.0
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  29. Judit Timar & Gyorgy Enyedi (2004). Applied Human Geography and Ethics From an East Central European Perspective. Ethics, Place and Environment 7 (3):173-184.score: 168.0
    Drawing on east central European, mainly Hungarian, experience, this paper views?from a different angle?some of the issues raised in international literature in connection with the ethics of applied human geography, and raises new ones. Citing a few examples of various personal, institutional and political economic ?terrains? within geography, it intends to underscore the importance of the issue of ?what kind of geography and what kind of geographers? in studying the ethics of geographical research. The paper also (...)
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  30. Judit Timár & György Enyedi (2004). Applied Human Geography and Ethics From an East Central European Perspective. Ethics, Place and Environment 7 (3):173 – 184.score: 168.0
    Drawing on east central European, mainly Hungarian, experience, this paper views - from a different angle - some of the issues raised in international literature in connection with the ethics of applied human geography, and raises new ones. Citing a few examples of various personal, institutional and political economic 'terrains' within geography, it intends to underscore the importance of the issue of 'what kind of geography and what kind of geographers' in studying the ethics of geographical (...)
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  31. Paul Cloke & Ron Johnston (2005). Deconstructing Human Geography's Binaries. In Paul J. Cloke & R. J. Johnston (eds.), Spaces of Geographical Thought: Deconstructing Human Geography's Binaries. Sage Publications. 1--21.score: 168.0
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  32. Peter J. Taylor (1989). The Error of Developmentalism in Human Geography. In Derek Gregory & Rex Walford (eds.), Horizons in Human Geography. Barnes & Noble Books. 303--319.score: 168.0
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  33. Rögnvaldur Ingthorsson (2013). The Natural Vs. The Human Sciences:: Myth, Methodology and Ontology. Discusiones Filosóficas 14 (22):25-41.score: 156.0
    I argue that the human sciences (i.e. humanities, social- and behavioural sciences) should not try to imitate the methodology of the natural sciences. The human sciences study meaningful phenomena whose nature is decisively different from the merely physical phenomena studied by the natural sciences, and whose study therefore require different methods; meaningful phenomena do not obviously obey natural laws while the merely physical necessarily does. This is not to say that the human sciences do not study (...)
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  34. Derek Gregory (1978/1979). Ideology, Science, and Human Geography. St. Martin's Press.score: 152.0
     
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  35. Denis Cosgrove (1989). Geography is Everywhere: Culture and Symbolism in Human Landscapes. In Derek Gregory & Rex Walford (eds.), Horizons in Human Geography. Barnes & Noble Books. 118--135.score: 148.0
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  36. Iain Hay (1998). Making Moral Imaginations. Research Ethics, Pedagogy, and Professional Human Geography. Philosophy and Geography 1 (1):55 – 75.score: 146.0
    This paper exhorts geographers to become more active in debate about ethical research practice. It also suggests that ethical theory, practical problems, and lessons learned from postmodern thought make the prospects of establishing prescriptive codes of ethics unlikely. Instead, flexible prompts for moral contemplation might be used to encourage careful thought on matters of ethics. Because the practical feasibility of moral prompts rests on the existence of moral imaginations, it is vital to consider ways in which those imaginations might be (...)
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  37. David Allan Rehorick (1991). Pickling Human Geography: The Souring of Phenomenology in the Human Sciences. [REVIEW] Human Studies 14 (4):359 - 369.score: 146.0
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  38. Allan Pred (1981). Power, Everyday Practice, and the Discipline of Human Geography. In Torsten Hägerstrand & Allan Pred (eds.), Space and Time in Geography: Essays Dedicated to Torsten Hägerstrand. Cwk Gleerup.score: 146.0
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  39. John A. Matthews & David T. Herbert (eds.) (2004). Unifying Geography: Common Heritage, Shared Future. Routledge.score: 144.0
    Unifying Geography focuses on the plural and competing versions of unity that characterize the discipline, which give it cohesion and differentiate it from related fields of knowledge. Each of the chapters is co-authored by both a leading physical and a human geographer. Themes identified include those of the traditional core as well as new and developing topics that are based on subject matter, concepts, methodology, theory, techniques and applications.
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  40. Mona Domosh (1997). With 'Stout Boots and a Stout Heart': Historical Methodology and Feminist Geography. In John Paul Jones, Heidi J. Nast & Susan M. Roberts (eds.), Thresholds in Feminist Geography: Difference, Methodology, and Representation. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers. 232.score: 144.0
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  41. P. Deffontaines (1953). The Religious Factor in Human Geography: Its Force and Its Limits. Diogenes 1 (2):24-37.score: 140.0
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  42. Scott Churchill (1986). Extensions in Human Science Methodology. Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 6 (2):132-132.score: 140.0
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  43. G. Mercier & G. Ritchot (1994). The Moral Dimension of Human Geography. Diogenes 42 (166):49-62.score: 140.0
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  44. R. S. Hitchings & V. Jones (2003). Living with Plants and the Exploration of Botanical Encounter in Human Geography Resarch Practice. Ethics, Place and Environment 7 (1):3-19.score: 140.0
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  45. P. Hubbard, R. Kitchin, G. Valentine, A. Leyshon, R. Lee, C. C. Williams, D. S. Madison, T. Mizuuchi, M. K. Nelson & K. R. Olwig (2005). Broz, S.(2004) Good People in an Evil Time: Portraits of Complicity and Resistance in the Bosnian War (New York: Other Press). Dorling, D.(2005) Human Geography of the UK (London: Sage Publications). Hall, CM & Page, SJ (2002) The Geography of Tourism and Recreation: Environment, Place and Space (2nd Edn.)(New York: Routledge). [REVIEW] Ethics, Place and Environment 8 (3):393.score: 140.0
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  46. Fara Rabenarivo (2008). Thinking Geographically: Space, Theory and Contemporary Human Geography (Review). Substance 37 (2):137-140.score: 140.0
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  47. Robert Eric Dickinson (1960). Some Problems of Human Geography. [Leeds]Leeds University Press.score: 140.0
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  48. Katharina Gerstenberger (2010). Mapping Spaces. Mapping Vision: Goethe, Cartography, and the Novel / Andrew Piper ; Just How Naughty Was Berlin? The Geography of Prostitution and Female Sexuality in Curt Moreck's Erotic Travel Guide / Jill Suzanne Smith ; Mapping a Human Geography: Spatiality in Uwe Johnson's Mutmassungen Über Jakob [Speculations About Jakob, 1959] / Jennifer Marston William ; Historical Space: Daniel Kehlmann's Die Vermessung der Welt [Measuring the World, 2005]. [REVIEW] In Jaimey Fisher & Barbara Caroline Mennel (eds.), Spatial Turns: Space, Place, and Mobility in German Literary and Visual Culture. Rodopi.score: 140.0
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