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  1. Jonathan Floyd (2011). Historical Facts and Political Principles. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 14 (1):89-90.
  2. Jonathan Floyd (2011). Why the History of Ideas Needs More Than Just Ideas. Intellectual History Review 21 (1):27-42.
    Bevir?s view that theories are prior to theorists, just in so far as they are prior to any observations which one might make and, by extension, any facts which one might invoke in support of any particular interpretative conclusions, is problematic when applied to intellectual history, for although it is in one sense true that all facts are ineluctably constituted by some or other underlying theory, it is also true that, in a vast number of important situations, all human beings (...)
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  3. Jonathan Floyd & Marc Stears (eds.) (2011). Political Philosophy Versus History: Contextualism and Real Politics in Contemporary Political Thought. Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: Introduction Jonathan Floyd and Marc Stears; 1. Rescuing political theory from the tyranny of history Paul Kelly; 2. From contextualism, to mentalism, to behaviourism Jonathan Floyd; 3. Contingency and judgement in history of political philosophy Bruce Haddock; 4. Political philosophy and the dead hand of its history Gordon Graham; 5. Politics, political theory, and its history Iain Hampsher-Monk; 6. Constraint, freedom, and exemplar Melissa Lane; 7. History and reality Andrew Sabl; 8. The new realism Bonnie Honig (...)
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  4. Jonathan Floyd (2010). Should Political Philosophy Be More Realistic? Res Publica 16 (3):337-347.
  5. Jonathan Floyd (2009). Is Political Philosophy Too Ahistorical? Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 12 (4):513-533.
    The accusation that contemporary political philosophy is carried out in too ahistorical a fashion depends upon it being possible for historical facts to ground normative political principles. This they cannot do. Each of the seven ways in which it might be thought possible for them to do so fails for one or more of four reasons: (1) History yields no timeless set of universal moral values; (2) it displays no convergence upon such a set; (3) it reveals no univocal moral (...)
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