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  1. Nicholas Royle (2010). Review Articles. Research in Phenomenology 40 (1):123-131.
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  2. Nicholas Royle (2008). Derrida's Event. In Robert Eaglestone & Simon Glendinning (eds.), Derrida's Legacies: Literature and Philosophy. Routledge.
     
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  3. Nicholas Royle (2006). Not Now. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 10 (2):379-393.
    This essay takes up the phrase “not now” as a way of trying to explore various aspects of Derrida’s work especially in the contexts of temporality, apocalypse, mourning and spectrality. It focuses on a range of Derrida’s texts, including Of Grammatology, “Ousia and Grammē,” the “Envois” in The Post Card, “No Apocalypse, Not Now,” “The Time is Out of Joint,” and Demeure: Fiction and Testimony. Attention is also given to the strange workings of “not now” in children’s literature (in particular (...)
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  4. Nicholas royle (2004). Hotel Psychoanalysis. Angelaki 9 (1):3 – 14.
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  5. Nicholas Royle (2003). Jacques Derrida. Routledge.
    In this entertaining and provocative introduction, Royle offers lucid explanations of various key ideas, including deconstruction, undecidability, iterability, differance, aporia, the pharmakon, the supplement, a new enlightenment, and the democracy to come. He also gives attention, however, to a range of less obvious key ideas of Derrida, such as earthquakes, animals and animality, ghosts, monstrosity, the poematic, drugs, gifts, secrets, war, and mourning. Derrida is seen as an extraordinarily inventive thinker, as well as a brilliantly imaginative and often very funny (...)
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  6. Nicholas Royle (2003). The Uncanny. Routledge.
    The uncanny is the weird, the strange, the mysterious, a mingling of the familiar and the unfamiliar. Even Freud, patron of the uncanny, had trouble defining it. Yet the uncanny is everywhere in contemporary culture. In this elegant book, Nicholas Royle takes the reader across literature, film, philosophy, and psychoanalysis as he marks the trace of the uncanny in the modern world. Not an introduction in the usual sense, Nicholas Royle's book is a geography of the uncanny as it manifests (...)
     
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  7. Nicholas Royle (2002). The Uncanny: An Introduction. Manchester University Press.
     
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  8. Nicholas Royle (1999). Yes, Yes, the University in Ruins. Critical Inquiry 26 (1):147.
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  9. Andrew Bennett & Nicholas Royle (1998). Torn-Off Senses. Angelaki 3 (3):153 – 158.
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  10. Nicholas Royle (1998). Jacques Derrida, Also, Enters Into Heaven. Angelaki 3 (2):113 – 116.
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  11. Nicholas Royle (1997). This is Not a Book Review: Esther Rashkin: Family Secrets and the Psychoanalysis of Narrative. Angelaki 2 (1):31 – 35.
    Esther Rashkin, Family Secrets and the Psychoanalysis of Narrative (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1992). Pages: 228. ISBN: 0-691069-51-4. Price: 1750/US$29.95.
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  12. Nicholas Royle (1994). States of Emergency. Critical Review 34:50.
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