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  1. Physician-Assisted Suicide (2000). Problems Involved in the Moral Justification of Medical Assistance in Dying. In Raphael Cohen-Almagor (ed.), Medical Ethics at the Dawn of the 21st Century. New York Academy of Sciences. 157.score: 340.0
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  2. Craig Paterson (2009). A History of Ideas Concerning the Morality of Suicide, Assisted Suicide and Voluntary Euthanasia. In Rajitha Tadikonda (ed.), Physician Assisted Euthanasia. Icfai University Press.score: 246.0
    In the chapter “A History of Ideas Concerning the Morality of Suicide, Assisted Suicide and Voluntary Euthanasia” author Craig Paterson explores questions concerning the legitimacy of the practices of suicide, assisted suicide, and voluntary euthanasia. The aim of this article is of identifying some of the main historical protagonists, and delineating some of the key arguments that have been used for the acceptance or rejection of these practices.
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  3. Craig Paterson (2010). Review of Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia: A Natural Law Ethics Approach. [REVIEW] Ethics and Medicine 26 (1):23-4.score: 240.0
    As medical technology advances and severely injured or ill people can be kept alive and functioning long beyond what was previously medically possible, the debate surrounding the ethics of end-of-life care and quality-of-life issues has grown more urgent. In this lucid and vigorous book, Craig Paterson discusses assisted suicide and euthanasia from a fully fledged but non-dogmatic secular natural law perspective. He rehabilitates and revitalises the natural law approach to moral reasoning by developing a pluralistic account of just (...)
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  4. Craig Paterson, A History of Ideas Concerning Suicide, Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia.score: 240.0
    The article examines from an historical perspective some of the key ideas used in contemporary bioethics debates both for and against the practices of assisted suicide and euthanasia. Key thinkers examined--spanning the Ancient, Medieval and Modern periods--include Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas, Hume, Kant, and Mill. The article concludes with a synthesizing summary of key ideas that oppose or defend assisted suicide and euthanasia.
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  5. Arthur J. Dyck (2002). Life's Worth: The Case Against Assisted Suicide. William B. Eerdmans Pub. Co..score: 240.0
    But as Harvard ethicist Arthur J. Dyck shows in this powerful work, there are solid moral and practical bases for the existing laws against assisted suicide in ...
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  6. Karen F. Balkin & Robert D. Lane (2005). Assisted Suicide. Greenhaven Press.score: 240.0
    Contributors explore the social, medical, and ethical dilemma of assisted suicide in this revised edition that includes international as well as domestic viewpoints. The federal government's continued challenges to Oregon's Death with Dignity Act, the disabled community's response to assisted suicide, and the slippery slope argument are all examined.
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  7. Craig Paterson (2001). The Contribution of Natural Law Theory to Moral and Legal Debate Concerning Suicide, Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia. Universal Publishers.score: 240.0
    Chapter one argues for the important contribution that a natural law based framework can make towards an analysis and assessment of key controversies surrounding the practices of suicide, assisted suicide, and voluntary euthanasia. The second chapter considers a number of historical contributions to the debate. The third chapter takes up the modern context of ideas that have increasingly come to the fore in shaping the 'push' for reform. Particular areas focused upon include the value of human life, (...)
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  8. Andrew Sneddon (2006). Equality, Justice, and Paternalism: Recentreing Debate About Physician-Assisted Suicide. Journal of Applied Philosophy 23 (4):387–404.score: 240.0
    Debate about physician-assisted suicide has typically focused on the values of autonomy and patient well-being. Margaret Battin, Rosamond Rhodes and Anita Silvers note that both those in favour of legalizing physician-assisted suicide and those who want this activity to be legally prohibited claim these values in support of their case. This is understandable, even reasonable, given the importance of these values in bioethics. However, these are not the only moral values there are. The purpose of this (...)
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  9. F. M. Kamm (2001). Ronald Dworkin on Abortion and Assisted Suicide. Journal of Ethics 5 (3):221-240.score: 240.0
    In the first part of this article, I raisequestions about Dworkin''s theory of theintrinsic value of life and about the adequacyof his proposal to understand abortion in termsof different ways of valuing life. In thesecond part of the article, I consider hisargument in ``The Philosophers'' Brief on AssistedSuicide'''', which claims that the distinctionbetween killing and letting die is morallyirrelevant, the distinction between intendingand foreseeing death can be morally relevantbut is not always so. I argue that thekilling/letting die distinction can be (...)
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  10. Manne Sjöstrand, Gert Helgesson, Stefan Eriksson & Niklas Juth (2013). Autonomy-Based Arguments Against Physician-Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia: A Critique. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (2):225-230.score: 240.0
    Respect for autonomy is typically considered a key reason for allowing physician assisted suicide and euthanasia. However, several recent papers have claimed this to be grounded in a misconception of the normative relevance of autonomy. It has been argued that autonomy is properly conceived of as a value, and that this makes assisted suicide as well as euthanasia wrong, since they destroy the autonomy of the patient. This paper evaluates this line of reasoning by investigating the (...)
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  11. Miles Little (1999). Assisted Suicide, Suffering and the Meaning of a Life. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 20 (3):287-298.score: 240.0
    The ethical problems surrounding voluntary assisted suicide remain formidable, and are unlikely to be resolved in pluralist societies. An examination of historical attitudes to suicide suggests that modernity has inherited a formidable complex of religious and moral attitudes to suicide, whether assisted or not. Advocates usually invoke the ending of intolerable suffering as one justification for euthanasia of this kind. This does not provide an adequate justification by itself, because there are (at least theoretically) methods (...)
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  12. Theo A. Boer (2007). Recurring Themes in the Debate About Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide. [REVIEW] Journal of Religious Ethics 35 (3):527 - 555.score: 240.0
    During the past four decades, the Netherlands played a leading role in the debate about euthanasia and assisted suicide. Despite the claim that other countries would soon follow the Dutch legalization of euthanasia, only Belgium and the American state of Oregon did. In many countries, intense discussions took place. This article discusses some major contributions to the discussion about euthanasia and assisted suicide as written by Nigel Biggar (2004), Arthur J. Dyck (2002), Neil M. Gorsuch (2006), (...)
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  13. Jukka Varelius (2013). Voluntary Euthanasia, Physician-Assisted Suicide, and the Right to Do Wrong. HEC Forum 25 (3):1-15.score: 240.0
    It has been argued that voluntary euthanasia (VE) and physician-assisted suicide (PAS) are morally wrong. Yet, a gravely suffering patient might insist that he has a moral right to the procedures even if they were morally wrong. There are also philosophers who maintain that an agent can have a moral right to do something that is morally wrong. In this article, I assess the view that a suffering patient can have a moral right to VE and PAS despite (...)
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  14. Jonathan Y. Tsou (2013). Depression and Suicide Are Natural Kinds: Implications for Physician-Assisted Suicide. International Journal of Law and Psychiatry 36 (5-6):461-470.score: 240.0
    In this article, I argue that depression and suicide are natural kinds insofar as they are classes of abnormal behavior underwritten by sets of stable biological mechanisms. In particular, depression and suicide are neurobiological kinds characterized by disturbances in serotonin functioning that affect various brain areas (i.e., the amygdala, anterior cingulate, prefrontal cortex, and hippocampus). The significance of this argument is that the natural (biological) basis of depression and suicide allows for reliable projectable inferences (i.e., predictions) to (...)
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  15. M. T. Harvey (2002). What Does a `Right' to Physician-Assisted Suicide (PAS) Legally Entail? Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 23 (4-5):271-286.score: 240.0
    ``What Does a Right to Physician-Assisted Suicide (PAS) Legallyentail?''''Much of the bioethics literature focuses on the morality ofPAS but ignores the legal implications of the conclusions thereby wrought. Specifically, what does a legal right toPAS entail both on the part of the physician and the patient? Iargue that we must begin by distinguishing a right to PAS qua``external'''' to a particular physician-patient relationship from a right to PAS qua ``internal'''' to a particular physician-patientrelationship. The former constitutes a negative (...)
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  16. Tal Bergman Levy, Shlomi Azar, Ronen Huberfeld, Andrew M. Siegel & Rael D. Strous (2013). Attitudes Towards Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide: A Comparison Between Psychiatrists and Other Physicians. Bioethics 27 (7):402-408.score: 240.0
    Euthanasia and physician assisted-suicide are terms used to describe the process in which a doctor of a sick or disabled individual engages in an activity which directly or indirectly leads to their death. This behavior is engaged by the healthcare provider based on their humanistic desire to end suffering and pain. The psychiatrist's involvement may be requested in several distinct situations including evaluation of patient capacity when an appeal for euthanasia is requested on grounds of terminal somatic illness (...)
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  17. Michael J. Hyde (2001). Defining “Human Dignity” in the Debate Over the (Im)Morality of Physician-Assisted Suicide. Journal of Medical Humanities 22 (1):69-82.score: 240.0
    Leon Kass's often-cited essay, “Death with Dignity and the Sanctity of Life,” provides the basis for a case study in the rhetorical function of definition in debates concerning bioethics. The study examines the way a particular definition of “human dignity” is used to maintain an advantage of power in the debate over the morality of physician-assisted suicide. It also considers sources of human dignity that are deflected from attention by the rhetoric of Kass's formulation.
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  18. Robert F. Rizzo (2000). Physician-Assisted Suicide in the United States: The Underlying Factors in Technology, Health Care and Palliative Medicine – Part One. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 21 (3):277-289.score: 240.0
    In an age of rapid advances inlife-prolonging treatment, patients and caregivers areincreasingly facing tensions in making end-of-lifedecisions. An examination of the history of healthcare in the United States reveals technological,economic, and medical factors that have contributed tothe problems of terminal care and consequently to themovement of assisted suicide. The movement has itsroots in at least two fundamental perceptions andexpectations. In the age of technological medicineenergized by the profit motive, dying comes at a highprice in suffering and in personal (...)
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  19. Margaret Pabst Battin (2010). The Irony of Supporting Physician-Assisted Suicide: A Personal Account. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 13 (4):403-411.score: 240.0
    Under other circumstances, I would have written an academic paper rehearsing the arguments for and against legalization of physician-assisted suicide: autonomy and the avoidance of pain and suffering on the pro side, the wrongness of killing, the integrity of the medical profession, and the risk of abuse, the “slippery slope,” on the con side. I’ve always supported the pro side. What this paper is, however, is a highly personal account of the challenges to my thinking about right-to-die issues. (...)
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  20. Physician-Assisted Suicide (2000). Please Note That Not All Books Mentioned on This List Will Be Reviewed. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 3:221-222.score: 240.0
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  21. Robert F. Rizzo (2000). Physician-Assisted Suicide in the United States: Confronting Legal and Medical Reasoning – Part Two. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 21 (3):291-304.score: 240.0
    In the United States, judicialrulings that unrealistically addressed the complexityof cases and demonstrated limited understanding ofprinciples, helped to create a legal quagmire whichlegislatures had to confront. Moreover, thelegislative response was often slow and inadequate interms of both the scope and clarity of the laws. However, since the 1970s, progress has been made onmany fronts, particularly in regard to advancedirectives dealing with end-of-life decisions. Thedebate over physician-assisted suicide has spawned arepetition of moral and legal arguments. Thoseagainst legalization have failed (...)
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  22. Fuat S. Oduncu & Stephan Sahm (2010). Doctor-Cared Dying Instead of Physician-Assisted Suicide: A Perspective From Germany. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 13 (4):371-381.score: 240.0
    The current article deals with the ethics and practice of physician-assisted suicide (PAS) and dying. The debate about PAS must take the important legal and ethical context of medical acts at the end of life into consideration, and cannot be examined independently from physicians’ duties with respect to care for the terminally ill and dying. The discussion in Germany about active euthanasia, limiting medical intervention at the end of life, patient autonomy, advanced directives, and PAS is not fundamentally (...)
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  23. Stef Van den Branden & Bert Broeckaert (2011). Living in the Hands of God. English Sunni E-Fatwas on (Non-)Voluntary Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 14 (1):29-41.score: 240.0
    Ever since the start of the twentieth century, a growing interest and importance of studying fatwas can be noted, with a focus on Arabic printed fatwas (Wokoeck 2009). The scholarly study of end-of-life ethics in these fatwas is a very recent feature, taking a first start in the 1980s (Anees 1984; Rispler-Chaim 1993). Since the past two decades, we have witnessed the emergence of a multitude of English fatwas that can easily be consulted through the Internet (‘e-fatwas’), providing Muslims worldwide (...)
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  24. Lorenz Imhof, Georg Bosshard, Susanne Fischer & Romy Mahrer-Imhof (2011). Content of Health Status Reports of People Seeking Assisted Suicide: A Qualitative Analysis. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 14 (3):265-272.score: 240.0
    Two right-to-die organisations offer assisted suicide in Switzerland. The specific legal situation allows assistance to Swiss and foreign citizens. Both organisations require a report of the person’s health status before considering assistance. This qualitative study explored these reports filed to legal authorities after the deaths of individuals in the area of Zurich. Health status reports in the legal medical dossiers of the deceased were analysed using content analysis and Grounded Theory. From 421 cases of assisted suicide (...)
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  25. Joris Gielen, Stef Van den Branden & Bert Broeckaert (2009). The Operationalisation of Religion and World View in Surveys of Nurses' Attitudes Toward Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 12 (4):423-431.score: 240.0
    Most quantitative studies that survey nurses’ attitudes toward euthanasia and/or assisted suicide, also attempt to assess the influence of religion on these attitudes. We wanted to evaluate the operationalisation of religion and world view in these surveys. In the Pubmed database we searched for relevant articles published before August 2008 using combinations of search terms. Twenty-eight relevant articles were found. In five surveys nurses were directly asked whether religious beliefs, religious practices and/or ideological convictions influenced their attitudes, or (...)
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  26. Physician-Assisted Suicide (2000). Raphael Cohen-Almagor. In Raphael Cohen-Almagor (ed.), Medical Ethics at the Dawn of the 21st Century. New York Academy of Sciences. 913--127.score: 240.0
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  27. Lucie White (2010). Euthanasia, Assisted Suicide and the Professional Obligations of Physicians. Emergent Australasian Philosophers 3 (1).score: 240.0
    Euthanasia and assisted suicide have proved to be very contentious topics in medical ethics. Some ethicists are particularly concerned that allowing physicians to carry out these procedures will undermine their professional obligations and threaten the very goals of medicine. However, I maintain that the fundamental goals of medicine not only do not preclude the practice of euthanasia and assisted suicide by physicians, but can in fact be seen to support these practices in some instances. I look (...)
     
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  28. Annabel Price, Ruaidhri McCormack, Theresa Wiseman & Matthew Hotopf (2014). Concepts of Mental Capacity for Patients Requesting Assisted Suicide: A Qualitative Analysis of Expert Evidence Presented to the Commission on Assisted Dying. BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):32.score: 216.0
    In May 2013 a new Assisted Dying Bill was tabled in the House of Lords and is currently scheduled for a second reading in May 2014. The Bill was informed by the report of the Commission on Assisted Dying which itself was informed by evidence presented by invited experts.
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  29. J. M. Dieterle (2007). Physician Assisted Suicide: A New Look at the Arguments. Bioethics 21 (3):127–139.score: 210.0
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  30. Susanna Maria Taraschi (2010). Paterson, Craig: Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia: A Natural Law Ethics Approach. [REVIEW] Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 31 (3):245-247.score: 210.0
  31. H. C. Müller-Busch, Fuat S. Oduncu, Susanne Woskanjan & Eberhard Klaschik (2005). Attitudes on Euthanasia, Physician-Assisted Suicide and Terminal Sedation--A Survey of the Members of the German Association for Palliative Medicine. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 7 (3):333-339.score: 210.0
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  32. Mark F. Carr (ed.) (2008). Physician Assisted Suicide: A Variety of Religious Perspectives. Wheatmark, Inc..score: 210.0
     
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  33. Fred Feldman, Playing God: A Problem for Physician Assisted Suicide?score: 180.0
    The 1998 elections were held just about two weeks ago.1 All across the country, Americans went to the polls to vote for Senators, Representatives to the House, Governors, and local officials. In many states they were also given the opportunity to vote on a wide variety of ballot questions, and among these ballot questions several concerned physician assisted suicide.
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  34. Michael B. Gill (2009). Is the Legalization of Physician-Assisted Suicide Compatible with Good End-of-Life Care? Journal of Applied Philosophy 26 (1):27-45.score: 180.0
    abstract Many have held that there is some kind of incompatibility between a commitment to good end-of-life care and the legalization of physician-assisted suicide. This opposition to physician-assisted suicide encompasses a cluster of different claims. In this essay I try to clarify some of the most important of these claims and show that they do not stand up well to conceptual and empirical scrutiny.
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  35. F. M. Kamm (1999). Physician‐Assisted Suicide, the Doctrine of Double Effect, and the Ground of Value. Ethics 109 (3):586-605.score: 180.0
    In this article, I shall present three arguments for thc pcrmissibility 0f physician-assisted suicide (PAS), and then examine several objections 0f 21 "K21nti2m" and non-Kantian nature against them. These are really 0bjcctions against certain types of suicide. I shall focus 0n active PAS (eg., when 21 patient takes 21 lethal drug given by E1 physician, in which case both thc physician and patient are active). I shall assume the patient is 21 competent, responsible, rational agent, who gives (...)
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  36. Lo Ping-cheung (2010). Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide From Confucian Moral Perspectives. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 9 (1):53-77.score: 180.0
    This essay first discusses the three major arguments in favor of euthanasia and physician-assisted-suicide in contemporary Western society, viz ., the arguments of mercy, preventing indignity, and individual autonomy. It then articulates both Confucian consonance and dissonance to them. The first two arguments make use of Confucian discussions on suicide whereas the last argument appeals to Confucian social-political thought. It concludes that from the Confucian moral perspectives, none of the three arguments is fully convincing.
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  37. Diane Christine Raymond (1999). &Quot;fatal Practices&Quot;: A Feminist Analysis of Physician-Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia. Hypatia 14 (2):1-25.score: 180.0
    : In this essay, I examine the arguments against physician-assisted suicide (PAS) Susan Wolf offers in her essay, "Gender, Feminism, and Death: Physician-Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia." I argue that Wolf's analysis of PAS, while timely and instructive in many ways, does not require that feminists reject policy approaches that might permit PAS. The essay concludes with reflections on the relationship between feminism and questions of agency, especially women's agency.
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  38. Jukka Varelius (2006). Voluntary Euthanasia, Physician-Assisted Suicide, and the Goals of Medicine. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 31 (2):121 – 137.score: 180.0
    It is plausible that what possible courses of action patients may legitimately expect their physicians to take is ultimately determined by what medicine as a profession is supposed to do and, consequently, that we can determine the moral acceptability of voluntary euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide on the basis of identifying the proper goals of medicine. This article examines the main ways of defining the proper goals of medicine found in the recent bioethics literature and argues that they cannot (...)
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  39. H. V. McLachlan (2010). Assisted Suicide and the Killing of People? Maybe. Physician-Assisted Suicide and the Killing of Patients? No: The Rejection of Shaw's New Perspective on Euthanasia. Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (5):306-309.score: 180.0
    David Shaw presents a new argument to support the old claim that there is not a significant moral difference between killing and letting die and, by implication, between active and passive euthanasia. He concludes that doctors should not make a distinction between them. However, whether or not killing and letting die are morally equivalent is not as important a question as he suggests. One can justify legal distinctions on non-moral grounds. One might oppose physician-assisted suicide and active euthanasia (...)
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  40. Perry A. Pugno (2004). One Physician's Perspective: Euthanasia and Physician-Assisted Suicide. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 12 (3):215-223.score: 180.0
    This paper looks at the ambiguities which PAS (physician assisted suicide) and voluntary active euthanasia (VAE ) present to the patient, his or her loved ones and the health-care team. The author pleads for a greater emphasis on humanizing the experience of the dying so that a team can meet their physical, emotional and spiritual needs.
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  41. Richard Momeyer (1995). Does Physician Assisted Suicide Violate the Integrity of Medicine? Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 20 (1):13-24.score: 180.0
    This paper evaluates the arguments against physician assisted suicide which contend that it violates the integrity of medicine and the physician-patient relation; i.e. that it contradicts the goal of seeking health and healing, violates an absolute prohibition against killing, and undermines the patient's trust in the physician. These arguments against physician assisted suicide (1) misuse notions of teleology and teleological explanation; (2) rely on inappropriate notions of "ideal medicine", for which death is a defeat; (3) turn (...)
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  42. Craig Paterson (2003). On Clarifying Terms in Applied Ethics Discourse: Suicide, Assisted Suicide, and Euthanasia. International Philosophical Quarterly 43 (3):351-358.score: 180.0
    All too often in applied ethics debates, there is a danger that a lack of analytical clarity and precision in the use of key terms serves to cloud and confuse the real nature of the debate being undertaken. A particular area of concern in my analysis of the bioethics literature has been the uses to which the key terms "suicide," "assisted suicide," and "euthanasia" are put. The modest aim of this article is to render a contribution to (...)
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  43. Michael Gill, A Moral Defense of Oregon's Physician-Assisted Suicide Law.score: 180.0
    Since 1998, physician-assisted suicide has been legal in the American state of Oregon. In this paper, I defend Oregon’s physician-assisted suicide (PAS) law against two of the most common objections raised against it. First, I try to show that it is not intrinsically wrong for someone with a terminal disease to kill herself. Second, I try to show that it is not intrinsically wrong for physicians to assist someone with a terminal disease who has reasonable grounds (...)
     
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  44. R. A. Ahmed, P. C. Sorum & E. Mullet (2010). Young Kuwaitis' Views of the Acceptability of Physician-Assisted Suicide. Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (11):671-676.score: 180.0
    Aim To study the views of people in a largely Muslim country, Kuwait, of the acceptability of a life-ending action such as physician-assisted suicide (PAS). Method 330 Kuwaiti university students judged the acceptability of PAS in 36 scenarios composed of all combinations of four factors: the patient's age (35, 60 or 85 years); the level of incurability of the illness (completely incurable vs extremely difficult to cure); the type of suffering (extreme physical pain or complete dependence) and the (...)
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  45. Bert Gordijn & Rien Janssens (2001). New Developments in Dutch Legislation Concerning Euthanasia and Physician-Assisted Suicide. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 26 (3):299 – 309.score: 180.0
    Dutch euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide stand on the eve of important legal changes. In the summer of 1999, a new government bill concerning euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide was sent to Parliament for discussion. This bill legally embodies a ground for exemption from punishment for physicians who conduct euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide and comply with certain requirements. On November 28, 2000, the Dutch parliament approved an adapted version of this bill. Since the approval by the (...)
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  46. Nico Peruzzi, Andrew Canapary & Bruce Bongar (1996). Physician-Assisted Suicide: The Role of Mental Health Professionals. Ethics and Behavior 6 (4):353 – 366.score: 180.0
    A review of the literature was conducted to better understand the (potential) role of mental health professionals in physician-assisted suicide. Numerous studies indicate that depression is one of the most commonly encountered psychiatric illnesses in primary care settings. Yet, depression consistently goes undetected and undiagnosed by nonpsychiatrically trained primary care physicians. Noting the well-studied link between depression and suicide, it is necessary to question giving sole responsibility of assisting patients in making end-of-life treatment decisions to these physicians. (...)
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  47. D. Micah Hester (1998). Progressive Dying: Meaningful Acts of Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide. Journal of Medical Humanities 19 (4):279-298.score: 180.0
    In this paper I use William James's understanding of significance in life to show that for certain patients euthanasia and assisted suicide can be importantly meaningful acts that family, friends, and health care professionals must acknowledge and even, at times, aid in bringing to fruition. Dying with meaning is transformative. It reshapes the lives of others that are left behind, giving to their lives new groundings by engaging them in the meaning of dying for us. For the patient, (...)
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  48. Kasper Raus, Sigrid Sterckx & Freddy Mortier (2011). Is Continuous Sedation at the End of Life an Ethically Preferable Alternative to Physician-Assisted Suicide? American Journal of Bioethics 11 (6):32 - 40.score: 180.0
    The relatively new practice of continuous sedation at the end of life (CS) is increasingly being debated in the clinical and ethical literature. This practice received much attention when a U.S. Supreme Court ruling noted that the availability of CS made legalization of physician-assisted suicide (PAS) unnecessary, as CS could alleviate even the most severe suffering. This view has been widely adopted. In this article, we perform an in-depth analysis of four versions of this ?argument of preferable alternative.? (...)
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  49. Thomas A. Cavanaugh (2001). The Instability of the Standard Justification for Physician-Assisted Suicide. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 10 (1):103-109.score: 180.0
    Proponents commonly justify the legalization of physician-assisted suicide (PAS) in terms of a patient's wanting to die (autonomy) and the patient's having a medically established good reason for suicide. These are the common elements of the standard justification offered for the legalization of PAS. In what follows, I argue that these two conditions exist in significant tension with one another, operating according to distinct dynamics that render the justification for PAS an unstable basis for public policy. Moreover, (...)
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  50. A. K. Fernandes (2001). Euthanasia, Assisted Suicide, and the Philosophical Anthropology of Karol Wojtyla. Christian Bioethics 7 (3):379-402.score: 180.0
    The lack of consensus in American society regarding the permissibility of assisted suicide and euthanasia is due in large part to a failure to address the nature of the human person involved in the ethical act itself. For Karol Wojtyla, philosopher and Pope, ethical action finds meaning only in an authentic understanding of the person; but it is through acting (actus humanus) alone that the human person reveals himself. Knowing what the person ought to be cannot be divorced (...)
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