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  1.  16
    When the Dog Bites the Subaltern.Scott Aikin & Trujillo Jr - 2024 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 28 (2):173-191.
    Many fans of Diogenes of Sinope laud his parrhesia, free speech used for critique. However, Diogenes abused not only the powerful but also the socially marginalized. We argue that interpreters of Diogenes cannot explain away the undeniably troublesome things that Diogenes said about those at the margins. But we also argue that Diogenes ought nonetheless to be preserved. Some of his chreiai can be reminders of how to be courageous and fight for the downtrodden, and others can serve as reminders (...)
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  2. Levinas on Separation: Metaphysical, Semantic, Affective.Bernardo Andrade - 2024 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 28 (2):429-452.
    In this paper I argue that, to conceive transcendence, Levinas retrieves the Platonic concept of “separation” and deploys it in three ways: metaphysically, semantically, and affectively. Levinas finds in the interaction between being and the Good beyond being of Republic VI 509b a certain “formal structure of transcendence”—one in which a term is conditioned by another while remaining absolutely separated from it. This formal structure is subsequently deployed metaphysically, in the relation between creator and creature; semantically, in the relation between (...)
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  3.  10
    Aristotle on Intensity.John Robert Bagby - 2024 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 28 (2):243-271.
    The role of intensity in Aristotelian philosophy is obscure. The problem has historically been approached through his logic and categorical sense of motion. Scholars have largely failed to consider the role of intensity in psychology and ethics, the consideration of which greatly clarifies the situation. To this end, I identify three types of intensity present in the corpus Aristotelicum: comparative, modal, inceptive. I show that the intensity of physical contraries is primary in nature but is different from those found in (...)
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  4.  24
    Force and Persuasion: The Musical Two-Tiered Structure of Plato’s Cosmology.Noam Cohen - 2024 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 28 (2):193-218.
    Most scholars have not assigned much interpretive importance to the specific use of the term ‘persuasion’ in the cosmology of Plato’s Timaeus. This paper suggests understanding cosmological ‘persuasion’ in conjunction with ‘force,’ another trait of divine agency in the Timaeus. It analyses the nature of intelligent causation in the cosmology of the Timaeus, particularly in the construction of the cosmic body and soul. Then, it gives a detailed characterization of the causation of necessity, appearing in the Timaeus in three different (...)
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  5.  14
    By the Way.Donald Cross - 2024 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 28 (2):405-427.
    No one who reads Derrida closely could accuse him of “technophobia.” More than any other contemporary thinker, on the contrary, he has shown the limit of attempts to protect thinking and even being itself from technē. Yet, Derrida nevertheless insists that “deconstruction” is neither a “technique” nor the technology of thinking that modern philosophy calls “method.” What allows Derrida to exclude “technique” and “method” when he himself shows, in relation to Heidegger above all, that a certain technicity and methodicity always (...)
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  6.  30
    The Diversity of Languages and Understanding the World.Hans-Georg Gadamer & Cynthia R. Nielsen - 2024 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 28 (2):453-466.
    This is my translation of Gadamer's 1990 lecture "The Diversity of Languages and Understanding of the World." "In his lecture, Gadamer presents his views of language and world in a distinctively hermeneutical key. For example, he emphasizes language as that which 'belongs to conversation.' That is, language as conversation helps to bring about understanding and involves the play of dialogical exchange. 'Language is not proposition and judgment; rather, it is what it is, only when it is question and answer.' Language (...)
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  7.  17
    The Most Interesting Point in the Kantian System.Khafiz Kerimov - 2024 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 28 (2):289-313.
    Hegel’s chief criticism of Kant in his early essay Faith and Knowledge is that Kant’s philosophy introduces the dichotomy between intuition and concept, between being and thought. As a result, Kantian philosophy fails to explain how the synthesis between concepts and intuitions in experience is possible. Kant’s theory of ideas is symptomatic of this failure: Kant’s idea refers to the concept of totality, the highest expression of reason, which is nonetheless not accessible to human experience. Yet, Hegel recognizes another conception (...)
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  8.  9
    Divine Ground and Vertical Level Order.Jan Kerkmann - 2024 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 28 (2):273-287.
    I argue that Goethe’s philosophy of nature can be presented in a vertical order of stages. By reading his natural philosophy as a system of hypostases, Goethe’s accentuation of a divine ground can be taken seriously. Related to the Neoplatonic hypostasis models, for Goethe the living organisms rest on a divine and metaphysical entity. It is a guiding argument of this article that the enigmatic and inexhaustible ‘Bildungstrieb’ (nisus formativus) of all-nature expresses itself in the respective primordial phenomena (Urphänomene). For (...)
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  9.  42
    Reconsidering Heidegger’s Temporal Idealism.Morganna Lambeth & Christopher Yeomans - 2024 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 28 (2):361-382.
    Is Heidegger a temporal idealist or a temporal realist? That is, does he believe that time is supplied by the human standpoint, or that we derive it from the structure of the world around us? Blattner makes a compelling case that Heidegger is a temporal idealist, but a failed one. Rousse, however, argues that Heidegger’s position is more promising when he is interpreted not as an unsuccessful idealist, but as an underdeveloped realist. In contrast, we offer arguments grounded in German (...)
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  10.  29
    Grounds and First Principles in Heidegger and Hegel.Samuel Patrick Munroe - 2024 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 28 (2):337-359.
    In this article, I provide an interpretation of Heidegger’s critique of Hegel. Hegel’s ability to provide a presuppositionless metaphysics is often taken to be the core strength of his Logic. In his critique of Hegel, Heidegger attempts to show that Hegel in fact smuggles in a decisive presupposition concerning being. Building on the recent work of Robert Pippin, I argue that we can understand this critique by situating it in terms of their common understanding of problems of first principles. Once (...)
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  11.  10
    Rereading Nietzsche with Philosophical Hermeneutics.Christopher R. Myers - 2024 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 28 (2):315-336.
    In this article I examine Nietzsche’s commentaries on the discipline of classical philology in relation to twentieth century philosophical hermeneutics. I argue that Nietzsche frequently made use of the concept of “life” to reflect ‘meta-critically’ on philology and nineteenth century hermeneutics, and that this use is much better represented by Heidegger and Gadamer than representatives of the standard Lebensphilosophie reading. Whereas the standard life-philosophical reading suggests that Nietzsche viewed the activity of interpretation as a mere symptom of biological, psychological life, (...)
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  12.  21
    Anonymous Presence.Daniel Neumann - 2024 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 28 (2):383-404.
    This article aims to sketch a phenomenological approach to Heidegger’s concept of Ereignis. In understanding Ereignis as the presencing of being, the fun­damental question is whether and how this presence of being, i.e., presence as such, can be experienced. While this experience is incompatible with a transcendental ap­proach, the suggestion here is that Ereignis can be experienced not as my own, but as an anonymous presence. To flesh out this suggestion, a close reading of Heidegger’s critique of subjectivity in the (...)
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  13.  25
    Too Radical Μέθεξις? Gadamer on Platonic Forms.Antoine Pageau-St-Hilaire - 2024 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 28 (2):219-241.
    This paper proposes a new interpretation of Gadamer’s problematic appropriation of Platonic metaphysics. It argues that Gadamer, attempting to respond to the challenge posed by Heidegger’s interpretation of Platonic metaphysics and of its role in the history of Being (Seinsgeschichte), downplayed the transcendence of Platonic Forms. Gadamer achieves a reconfiguration of this transcendence and its transposition into what I call here a plane of immanence through two hermeneutic gestures: 1) interpreting Forms in light of Greek mathematics and especially in light (...)
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  14.  16
    Heraclitus’s DK 22 B 85 Revisited.Tomáš Vítek - 2024 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 28 (2):143-171.
    In Heraclitus’ time, thymos and psyche carried highly similar or even identical meanings, because both could refer to life, courage, personality, emotions, and reason. Heraclitus probably worked with all of these meanings. He may have been partly inspired by Homer and post-Homeric literature, where the two terms were likewise placed side by side and often used interchangeably. In Heraclitus, thymos and psyche are not opposites in terms of signification. Oftentimes, they can be “swapped,” and their meaning and “costs” exchanged. The (...)
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