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Adrienne Martin
Claremont McKenna College
  1.  74
    How We Hope: A Moral Psychology.Adrienne M. Martin - 2014 - Princeton: Princeton University Press.
    What exactly is hope and how does it influence our decisions? In How We Hope, Adrienne Martin presents a novel account of hope, the motivational resources it presupposes, and its function in our practical lives. She contends that hoping for an outcome means treating certain feelings, plans, and imaginings as justified, and that hope thereby involves sophisticated reflective and conceptual capacities. Martin develops this original perspective on hope--what she calls the "incorporation analysis"--in contrast to the two dominant philosophical conceptions of (...)
  2. Personal Bonds: Directed Obligations without Rights.Adrienne M. Martin - 2021 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 102 (1):65-86.
    I argue for adopting a conception of obligation that is broader than the conception commonly adopted by moral philosophers. According to this broader conception, the crucial marks of an obligatory action are, first, that the reasons for the obliged party to perform the action include an exclusionary reason and, second, that the obliged party is the appropriate target of blaming reactive attitudes, if they inexcusably fail to perform the obligatory action. An obligation is directed if the exclusionary reason depends on (...)
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  3. Owning up and lowering down: The power of apology.Adrienne M. Martin - 2010 - Journal of Philosophy 107 (10):534-553.
    Apologies are strange. They are, in a certain sense, very small. An apology is just a gesture—a set of words, a physical posture, perhaps a gift. But an apology can also be very powerful—this power is implicit in the facts that it can be difficult to offer an apology and that, when we are wronged, we may want an apology very much. More, even we have been severely wronged, we are sometimes willing to forgive or pardon the wrongdoer, if we (...)
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  4. Hopes and Dreams.Adrienne M. Martin - 2010 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 83 (1):148 - 173.
    It is a commonplace in both the popular imagination and the philosophical literature that hope has a special kind of motivational force. This commonplace underwrites the conviction that hope alone is capable of bolstering us in despairinducing circumstances, as well as the strategy of appealing to hope in the political realm. In section 1, I argue that, to the contrary, hope’s motivational essence is not special or unique—it is simply that of an endorsed desire. The commonplace is not entirely mistaken, (...)
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  5. Hope and Exploitation.Adrienne M. Martin - 2008 - Hastings Center Report 38 (5):49-55.
    How do we encourage patients to be hopeful without exploiting their hope? A medical researcher or a pharmaceutical company can take unfair advantage of someone's hope by much subtler means than simply giving misinformation. Hope shapes deliberation, and therefore can make deliberation better or worse, by the deliberator's own standards of deliberation.
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  6.  78
    Tales Publicly Allowed: Competence, Capacity, and Religious Belief.Adrienne M. Martin - 2007 - Hastings Center Report 37 (1):33-40.
    What should we make of someone whose beliefs prevent her from accurately understanding her medical needs and care? Should that person still make her own health care decisions? In fact, she probably lacks decision‐making capacity. But that does not mean she is not competent.
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  7. Love, Incorporated.Adrienne M. Martin - 2015 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 18 (4):691-702.
    In this paper, I outline a Kantian moral psychology and use it to generate an analysis of the emotional attitude, love. At the heart of this moral psychology is a distinction between rational and subrational motives, and the thesis that interpersonal emotional attitudes like love are governed by a norm of respect. I show how an analysis of love that relies on this moral psychology—which I call “the incorporation conception” of love—tightly fits with paradigmatic cases of romantic love, reveals both (...)
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  8.  59
    Against Mother's Day and Employee Appreciation Day and Other Representations of Oppressive Expectations as Opportunities for Excellence and Beneficence.Adrienne M. Martin - 2021 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 102 (1):126-146.
    Appreciation and gratitude get good press: They are central virtues in many religious and secular ethical frameworks, core in positive psychology research, and they come highly recommended by the self‐improvement set. Generally, appreciation and gratitude feature as good things, in popular consciousness. Of course, on an Aristotelian model, the belief that these are virtues implies they are something people can get right or wrong. This paper examines bad appreciation and bad gratitude, characterizing forms of appreciation and gratitude at the center (...)
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  9. How to argue for the value of humanity.Adrienne M. Martin - 2006 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 87 (1):96-125.
    Pacific Philosophical Quarterly, March 2006. Significant effort has been devoted to locating a good argument for Kant ’s Formula of Humanity. In this paper, I contrast two arguments, based on Kant ’s text, for the Formula of Humanity. The first, which I call the “Valued Ends” argument, is an influential and appealing argument developed most notably by Christine Korsgaard and Allen Wood. Notwithstanding the appeal and influence of this argument, it ultimately fails on several counts. I therefore present as an (...)
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  10.  68
    The Routledge Handbook of Love in Philosophy.Adrienne M. Martin (ed.) - 2018 - New York: Routledge Handbooks in Philoso.
    The Routledge Handbook of Love in Philosophycollects 39 original chapters from prominent philosophers on the nature, meaning, value, and predicaments of love, presented in a unique framework that highlights the rich variety of methods and traditions used to engage with these subjects. This volume is structured around important realms of human life and activity, each of which receives its own section: I. Family and Friendship II. Romance and Sex III. Politics and Society IV. Animals, Nature, and the Environment V. Art, (...)
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  11.  46
    Emotion and the emotions.Susan Sauvé Meyer & Adrienne M. Martin - 2013 - In Roger Crisp (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of the History of Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    The dominant consequentialist, Kantian, and contractualist theories by virtue ethicists such as G.E.M. Anscombe, Alisdair MacIntyre, Martha Nussbaum, and Michael Stocker have been criticized for their neglect of the emotions. There are three reasons why it might be a mistake for moral philosophy to neglect the emotions. Emotions have an important influence on motivation, and proper cultivation of the emotions is helpful, perhaps essential, to our ability to lead ethical lives. It is a plausible thesis that an ethical life involves (...)
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  12.  38
    Commentary.Catherine Hickey & Adrienne M. Martin - 2012 - Hastings Center Report 41 (2):18-18.
    There are instances where religious beliefs can negatively impact a patient's decision-making capability. Any belief system that categorically prohibits psychiatric treatment in all cases is dangerous. The situation is illustrated through a case of a patient with schizophrenia who refuses to acknowledge her disease because of her religion.
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  13.  14
    Commentary.Adrienne M. Martin - 2011 - Hastings Center Report 41 (2):19-19.
  14. Love, Kantian Style.Adrienne M. Martin - unknown
    We are interestingly ambivalent about romantic love, in a number of cases. Consider a man who abuses his wife, but is also passionate about her and easily distraught at the thought of losing her. There is some sense in which he loves her, but another in which he absolutely does not. Consider, too, a longtime partner who feels she has rather suddenly “fallen out of love” with the person to whom she was once devoted. She continues to feel there is (...)
     
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  15. Please cite published version.Adrienne M. Martin - unknown
    In their classic, Principles of Biomedical Ethics (now in its fifth edition), Beauchamp and Childress, describe a puzzling case: A man who generally exhibits normal behavior patterns is involuntarily committed to a mental institution as the result of bizarre self-destructive behavior (pulling out an eye and cutting off a hand). This behavior results from his unusual religious beliefs. … [H]is peculiar actions follow “reasonably” from his religious beliefs. …While analysis in terms of limited competence might at first appear plausible, such (...)
     
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  16.  43
    The expressive meaning of enhancement.Adrienne M. Martin & Jehanna Peerzada - 2005 - American Journal of Bioethics 5 (3):25 – 27.
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  17. Taking religion seriously-Reply.Adrienne M. Martin - 2007 - Hastings Center Report 37 (4):5-6.
     
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  18. Why Instruments Aren't Reasons.Adrienne M. Martin - 2004 - Dissertation, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
    "[R]easons for action must have their source in goals, desires, or intentions....[T]he possession of rationality is not sufficient to provide a source for relevant reasons,...certain desires, goals, or intentions are also necessary." ;So says Gilbert Harman. So say many other philosophers, from Aristotle to Hume to Harman and David Gauthier. To these many philosophers, this is a home truth, as obvious as the nose on your face. And yet as many philosophers---from the Stoics to Kant to Nagel and Korsgaard---reject this (...)
     
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  19.  28
    Aspiration: The Agency of Becoming by AgnesCallard. New York: Oxford University Press, 2018, xiii + 287 pp. ISBN 9780190639488 hb. [REVIEW]Adrienne M. Martin - 2019 - European Journal of Philosophy 27 (3):814-817.
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