20 found
Order:
  1.  30
    Is There a Pervasive Implicit Bias Against Theism in Psychology?Brent D. Slife & Jeffrey S. Reber - 2009 - Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 29 (2):63-79.
    To address the title question, the authors first conceptualize the worldview of theism in relation to its historical counterpart in Western culture, naturalism. Many scholars view the worldview of naturalism as not only important to traditional science but also neutral to theism. This neutrality has long provided the justification for psychological science to inform and even correct theistic understandings. Still, this view of neutrality, as the authors show, stems from the presumption that these two worldviews are philosophically compatible. The authors’ (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  2.  70
    Taking Practice Seriously: Toward a Relational Ontology.Brent D. Slife - 2004 - Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 24 (2):157-178.
    Mainstream psychologists have not only ignored the unique and radical character of practice; they have generally misunderstood it. A major reason for this ignorance and misunderstanding is mainstream psychology's assumption of a particular ontology--abstractionism. With abstractionism, psychologists have generally assumed that abstractions, such as theories, techniques, and principles, capture and embody the fundamentally real. Most pertinently, abstractions are believed to precede and lay the foundation for good and thoughtful practice. Indeed, practices do not exist, in an important ontological sense, except (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  3.  16
    A 'Narrowing of Inquiry' in American Moral Psychology and Education.Michael J. Richardson & Brent D. Slife - 2013 - Journal of Moral Education 42 (2):193-208.
    We explore the possibility that a priori philosophical commitments continue to result in a narrowing of inquiry in moral psychology and education where theistic worldviews are concerned. Drawing from the theories of Edward L. Thorndike and John Dewey, we examine naturalistic philosophical commitments that influenced the study of moral psychology and moral education in the USA. We then address the question of whether these foundational naturalistic commitments can be rendered as compatible with theistic commitments, using both modernist and postmodern philosophical (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  4.  8
    Depression, Cognitive Skill, and Metacognitive Skill in Problem Solving.Brent D. Slife & Charles A. Weaver - 1992 - Cognition and Emotion 6 (1):1-22.
  5.  44
    Are Discourse Communities Incommensurable in a Fragmented Psychology? The Possibility of Disciplinary Coherence.Brent D. Slife - 2000 - Journal of Mind and Behavior 21 (3):261-272.
    The question of incommensurability is an overlooked issue that has profound consequences for our ability to understand relationships and utilize common standards for comparison, contrast, and evaluation in psychology. Are the differences among discourse communities so deep that there is no common "commensurate" &emdash; no common measuring stick for making comparisons among communities? If so, then the community of communities, the discipline of psychology, has no way to compare competing knowledge claims, and no way to effect disciplinary unity and coherence. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  4
    The Need for Temporality in Theoretical Psychology: A Commentary on Manoussakis’s The Ethics of Time.Brent D. Slife - 2018 - Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 38 (2):101-106.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  39
    Critical Thinking in Social and Psychological Inquiry.Frank C. Richardson & Brent D. Slife - 2011 - Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 31 (3):165-172.
    Yanchar, Slife, and their colleagues have described how mainstream psychology's notion of critical thinking has largely been conceived of as “scientific analytic reasoning” or “method-centered critical thinking.” We extend here their analysis and critique, arguing that some version of the one-sided instrumentalism and confusion about tacit values that characterize scientistic approaches to inquiry also color phenomenological, critical theoretical, and social constructionist viewpoints. We suggest that hermeneutic/dialogical conceptions of inquiry, including the idea of social theory as itself a form of ethically (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  27
    Introduction and Overview of the Special Issue on Aristotle.Brent D. Slife - 1990 - Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 10 (1):3-6.
    Aristotle's scientific legacy underlies much of what is currently considered mainstream psychology. Surprisingly, however, only a paucity of writings have elucidated this fact. To be sure, history of psychology texts register him as one of our intellectual ancestors, but unfortunately most psychologists appear to view Aristotle as an anachronism with little but the most indirect of influences upon modern theory and practice. The present issue of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology is part of the effort begun by scholars such as Robinson (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  27
    Virtue Ethics in Practice: The Greenbrier Academy.Brent D. Slife - 2012 - Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 32 (1):35-42.
    Part of the development of ontological or “strong” relationality has been the exploration of its more applied aspects. My focus for this article is a therapeutic boarding school, which L. Jay Mitchell and I cofounded in West Virginia. I describe how our intention to base this school exclusively on strong relationality led us to employ Aristotle's virtue ethics. 2012 APA, all rights reserved).
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  12
    Editorial Note.Brent D. Slife - 1989 - Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 9 (1):2-2.
    This editorial introduces the current issue of Theoretical & Philosophical Psychology. The current editor describes the direction that the journal will be taking in the upcoming future. 2012 APA, all rights reserved).
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  26
    The Prejudice Against Prejudice: A Reply to the Comments.Brent D. Slife & Jeffrey S. Reber - 2009 - Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 29 (2):128-136.
    After discussing a prominent theme of many of the comments, the prejudice against prejudice, the points at issue in this dialogue are explicated by addressing six questions: Issue 1: Are we trying to make psychology into a theistic enterprise? Issue 2: Are we ultimately arguing for some kind of dualism? Issue 3: Does theism’s involvement make science impossible? Issue 4: Is psychology’s treatment of theism truly a form of prejudice? Issue 5: Are some approaches to inquiry basically unbiased and neutral? (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  20
    Free Will and Time: That "Stuck" Feeling.Brent D. Slife - 1994 - Journal of Theoretical and Philsophical Psychology 14 (1):1-12.
    Clarifies the central elements of the "stuckness" feeling in the traditional framework for free will and determinism in psychology, based on the inherent dependence on context and the assumed need of free will to be independent of context. These central elements are examined from the relatively overlooked perspective of time. A large part of the stuckness is revealed to stem from the linear assumption of time, rather than the linear nature of causality, as usually assumed. Suggestions are offered for overcoming (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13.  15
    The Practice of Theoretical Psychology.Brent D. Slife - 2000 - Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 20 (2):97-115.
    Presents the Presidential Address to the Division of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology . In this address, the author discusses his current plans to tackle the practical issues of theoretical psychology instead of, as past presidents have done, pushing the already established conceptual envelope of theoretical psychology. 2012 APA, all rights reserved).
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14.  7
    Time, Information, and Determinism in Psychology.Brent D. Slife - 2002 - In Harald Atmanspacher & Robert C. Bishop (eds.), Between Chance and Choice: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Determinism. Thorverton Uk: Imprint Academic. pp. 469--484.
  15. Division 24 Convention Program 1994.Jeffrey P. Lindstrom, Stephen C. Yanchar, Beyond Complementarity, Lisa M. Osbeck, Brent D. Slife, Adelbert H. Jenkins, Free Will & George S. Howard - 1994 - Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology: Journal of Division 24 14 (1):107.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16.  4
    Free Will and Time: That "Stuck" Feeling.Brent D. Slife - 1994 - Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 14 (1):1-12.
    Clarifies the central elements of the "stuckness" feeling in the traditional framework for free will and determinism in psychology, based on the inherent dependence on context and the assumed need of free will to be independent of context. These central elements are examined from the relatively overlooked perspective of time. A large part of the stuckness is revealed to stem from the linear assumption of time, rather than the linear nature of causality, as usually assumed. Suggestions are offered for overcoming (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17.  2
    The Possibility of Possibility.Brent D. Slife - 1994 - Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 14 (1):96-101.
    Comments that B. D. Slife , M. Gergen , R. N. Williams , and M. S. Richardson all seem to suggest that the contextless nature of the traditional conception of free will is problematic. Although each author attempts to contextualize this traditional conception, many of their explanations reveal that the underlying problem remains. It is suggested that a radically new assumption of time, such as Heidegger's temporality, is necessary. 2012 APA, all rights reserved).
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. Editors' Introduction: The Modern Legacy of William James's A Pluralistic Universe.Brent D. Slife & Dennis C. Wendt - 2009 - Journal of Mind and Behavior 30 (3):103.
    Perhaps no name is more clearly associated with the formulation of American psychology than that of William James. Yet, one of James’s last published works, A Pluralistic Universe, is little known and rarely cited in the discipline. On the 100th anniversary of the publication of this book, the authors of this special issue of The Journal of Mind and Behavior explore the past, present, and future legacy of the provocative ideas contained in this volume for psychology, including the history of (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. ""Interpreting the" Biologization" of Psychology.Brent D. Slife, Colin Burchfield & Dawson Hedges - 2010 - Journal of Mind and Behavior 31 (3-4):165-177.
    Behavior and cognition, once conceived as psychological or interpersonal in origin, are increasingly thought to arise from biology. After investigating the validity of this trend of thinking, the article attempts to interpret what it means to the discipline of psychology. Two main categories of interpretation are discussed. First, this trend could mean that biological factors ultimately underlie traditionally psychological explanations i.e., biological factors are a sufficient condition for understanding behavior and cognition. Second, this trend could indicate that biological factors are (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20. Recent Calls for Jamesian Pluralism in the Natural and Social Sciences: Will Psychology Heed the Call?Dennis C. Wendt & Brent D. Slife - 2009 - Journal of Mind and Behavior 30 (3):185-204.
    William James’s A Pluralistic Universe was not very influential in his day; 100 years later, however, calls for a Jamesian-style pluralism are increasingly common in the natural and social sciences. We first summarize James’s critique of monism and his defense of pluralism. Next, we discuss similar critiques of monism and calls for “strong” pluralism across the natural and social sciences, even in traditional bastions of monism like physics, biology, and economics. We then argue that psychology is also in need of (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark