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Don Chalmers [9]Donald Chalmers [3]
  1.  57
    Has the biobank bubble burst? Withstanding the challenges for sustainable biobanking in the digital era.Don Chalmers, Dianne Nicol, Jane Kaye, Jessica Bell, Alastair V. Campbell, Calvin W. L. Ho, Kazuto Kato, Jusaku Minari, Chih-Hsing Ho, Colin Mitchell, Fruzsina Molnár-Gábor, Margaret Otlowski, Daniel Thiel, Stephanie M. Fullerton & Tess Whitton - 2016 - BMC Medical Ethics 17 (1):1.
    _BMC Medical Ethics_ is an open access journal publishing original peer-reviewed research articles in relation to the ethical aspects of biomedical research and clinical practice, including professional choices and conduct, medical technologies, healthcare systems and health policies. _BMC __Medical Ethics _is part of the _BMC_ series which publishes subject-specific journals focused on the needs of individual research communities across all areas of biology and medicine. We do not make editorial decisions on the basis of the interest of a study or (...)
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  2. Country Reports.Ma'N. H. Zawati, Don Chalmers, Sueli G. Dallari, Marina de Neiva Borba, Miriam Pinkesz, Yann Joly, Haidan Chen, Mette Hartlev, Liis Leitsalu, Sirpa Soini, Emmanuelle Rial-Sebbag, Nils Hoppe, Tina Garani-Papadatos, Panagiotis Vidalis, Krishna Ravi Srinivas, Gil Siegal, Stefania Negri, Ryoko Hatanaka, Maysa Al-Hussaini, Amal Al-Tabba', Lourdes Motta-Murgía, Laura Estela Torres Moran, Aart Hendriks, Obiajulu Nnamuchi, Rosario Isasi, Dorota Krekora-Zajac, Eman Sadoun, Calvin Ho, Pamela Andanda, Won Bok Lee, Pilar Nicolás, Titti Mattsson, Vladislava Talanova, Alexandre Dosch, Dominique Sprumont, Chien-Te Fan, Tzu-Hsun Hung, Jane Kaye, Andelka Phillips, Heather Gowans, Nisha Shah & James W. Hazel - 2019 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 47 (4):582-704.
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  3.  15
    A Role for Research Ethics Committees in Exchanges of Human Biospecimens Through Material Transfer Agreements.Donald Chalmers, Dianne Nicol, Pilar Nicolás & Nikolajs Zeps - 2014 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 11 (3):301-306.
    International transfers of human biological material (biospecimens) and data are increasing, and commentators are starting to raise concerns about how donor wishes are protected in such circumstances. These exchanges are generally made under contractual material transfer agreements (MTAs). This paper asks what role, if any, should research ethics committees (RECs) play in ensuring legal and ethical conduct in such exchanges. It is recommended that RECs should play a more active role in the future development of best practice MTAs involving exchange (...)
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  4. Research Ethics in Australia.Donald Chalmers - forthcoming - National Bioethics Advisory Commission 6705 Rockledge Drive, Suite 700, Bethesda, Maryland 20892-7979 Telephone: 301-402-4242• Fax: 301-480-6900• Website: Www. Bioethics. Gov.
     
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  5.  12
    Biobanking and Privacy Laws in Australia.Don Chalmers - 2015 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 43 (4):703-713.
    Australia is a multi-cultural society with a population of nearly 24 million. The Aboriginal heritage traces back some 40,000 years and continues to influence Australian culture as a whole. A large proportion of Australian citizens were of British descent or birth at the outset of the last century, but post-World War II there was significant immigration from other European nations, particularly from Greece and Italy. In the last decades, there has been a significant intake of migrants from Asia.
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  6.  16
    Research Involving Humans: A Time for Change?Don Chalmers - 2004 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 32 (4):583-595.
    Amongst Professor Dickens’ extensive writings on medical law and medical jurisprudence are a host of distinguished contributions on the subject of the proper legal and ethical limits on human experimentation. As early as 1975, Professor Dickens was examining the legal aspects of human experimentation. A few years later he was promoting the responsibility of researchers to recognize and protect human rights in medical experimentation. In the last two decades, Professor Dickens has penned a rich flow of scholarly contributions on the (...)
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  7.  6
    Research Involving Humans: A Time for Change?Don Chalmers - 2004 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 32 (4):583-595.
    Amongst Professor Dickens’ extensive writings on medical law and medical jurisprudence are a host of distinguished contributions on the subject of the proper legal and ethical limits on human experimentation. As early as 1975, Professor Dickens was examining the legal aspects of human experimentation. A few years later he was promoting the responsibility of researchers to recognize and protect human rights in medical experimentation. In the last two decades, Professor Dickens has penned a rich flow of scholarly contributions on the (...)
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  8. Cross-Cultural Biotechnology: A Reader.Stella Gonzalez Arnal, Donald Chalmers, David Kum-Wah Chan, Margaret Coffey, Jo Ann T. Croom, Mylène Deschênes, Henrich Ganthaler, Yuri Gariev, Ryuichi Ida, Jeffrey P. Kahn, Martin O. Makinde, Anna C. Mastroianni, Katharine R. Meacham, Bushra Mirza, Michael J. Morgan, Dianne Nicol, Edward Reichman, Susan E. Wallace & Larissa P. Zhiganova - 2004 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    This book is a rich blend of analyses by leading experts from various cultures and disciplines. A compact introduction to a complex field, it illustrates biotechnology's profound impact upon the environment and society. Moreover, it underscores the vital relevance of cultural values. This book empowers readers to more critically assess biotechnology's value and effectiveness within both specific cultural and global contexts.
     
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  9.  5
    At First Glance, the First Informed Consent Case to Be Decided by the High Court of Australia Appears to Be Little More Than a Clear and Simple Description of the Substantive Law Accepted in Most American Jurisdictions—Although That is No Small Accomplishment in and of Itself. In Rogers V. Whitaker, the Highest Court in Aus. [REVIEW]Don Chalmers & Robert Schwartz - 1993 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 2:371-379.
  10.  16
    Is There a Need or Space for Gene Technology Ethics: An Australian Perspective.Don Chalmers - 2008 - In Darryl R. J. Macer (ed.), Asia-Pacific Perspectives on Biotechnology and Bioethics. Unesco Bangkok. pp. 1888.
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  11. The Expectation Gap, Risk Management and the Australian HREC System.Don Chalmers - 2002 - Monash Bioethics Review 21 (3):S49-S57.
    The Australian HREC system is experiencing increasing workloads and greater public scrutiny. Dr Dodds asks whether the system is sustainable and aims to encourage a constructive critical debate about the system. This article suggests there is a gap between the demands on the system and expectations of researchers, regulators and the community. The evolution of the HREC system reached a significant milestone of the publication of the National Statement on Ethical Conduct in Research Involving Humans. This article argues that there (...)
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  12.  34
    Malpractice Liability for the Failure to Adequately Educate Patients: The Australian Law of “Informed Consent” and Its Implications for American Ethics Committees.Don Chalmers & Robert Schwartz - 1993 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 2 (3):371.
    At first glance, the first informed consent case to be decided by the High Court of Australia appears to be little more than a clear and simple description of the substantive law accepted in most American jurisdictions - although that is no small accomplishment in and of itself. In Rogers v. Whitaker, the highest court in Australia succinctly and persuasively rejected informed consent as a species of battery law, accepted it as a form, of ordinary professional negligence law, and adopted (...)
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