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Francois Nosten [5]F. Nosten [2]
  1.  51
    Exploitation and Community Engagement: Can Community Advisory Boards Successfully Assume a Role Minimising Exploitation in International Research?Bridget Pratt, Khin Maung Lwin, Deborah Zion, Francois Nosten, Bebe Loff & Phaik Yeong Cheah - 2015 - Developing World Bioethics 15 (1):18-26.
    It has been suggested that community advisory boards can play a role in minimising exploitation in international research. To get a better idea of what this requires and whether it might be achievable, the paper first describes core elements that we suggest must be in place for a CAB to reduce the potential for exploitation. The paper then examines a CAB established by the Shoklo Malaria Research Unit under conditions common in resource-poor settings – namely, where individuals join with a (...)
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  2.  24
    Motivations and Perceptions of Community Advisory Boards in the Ethics of Medical Research: The Case of the Thai-Myanmar Border.Khin Maung Lwin, Phaik Y. Cheah, Phaik K. Cheah, Nicholas J. White, Nicholas P. J. Day, Francois Nosten & Michael Parker - 2014 - BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):12.
    Community engagement is increasingly promoted as a marker of good, ethical practice in the context of international collaborative research in low-income countries. There is, however, no widely agreed definition of community engagement or of approaches adopted. Justifications given for its use also vary. Community engagement is, for example, variously seen to be of value in: the development of more effective and appropriate consent processes; improved understanding of the aims and forms of research; higher recruitment rates; the identification of important ethical (...)
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  3.  7
    Motivations and Perceptions of Community Advisory Boards in the Ethics of Medical Research: The Case of the Thai-Myanmar Border.Michael Parker, Francois Nosten, Nicholas P. J. Day, Nicholas J. White, Phaik Kin Cheah, Phaik Yeong Cheah & Khin Maung Lwin - 2014 - BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1).
    BackgroundCommunity engagement is increasingly promoted as a marker of good, ethical practice in the context of international collaborative research in low-income countries. There is, however, no widely agreed definition of community engagement or of approaches adopted. Justifications given for its use also vary. Community engagement is, for example, variously seen to be of value in: the development of more effective and appropriate consent processes; improved understanding of the aims and forms of research; higher recruitment rates; the identification of important ethical (...)
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  4. Ancillary Care: From Theory to Practice in International Clinical Research.B. Pratt, D. Zion, K. M. Lwin, P. Y. Cheah, F. Nosten & B. Loff - 2013 - Public Health Ethics 6 (2):154-169.
    How international research might contribute to justice in global health has not been substantively addressed by bioethics. This article describes how the provision of ancillary care can link international clinical research to the reduction of global health disparities. It identifies the ancillary care obligations supported by a theory of global justice, showing that Jennifer Ruger’s health capability paradigm requires the delivery of ancillary care to trial participants for a limited subset of conditions that cause severe morbidity and mortality. Empirical research (...)
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  5.  21
    Linking International Clinical Research with Stateless Populations to Justice in Global Health.Bridget Pratt, Deborah Zion, Khin M. Lwin, Phaik Y. Cheah, Francois Nosten & Bebe Loff - 2014 - BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):49.
    In response to calls to expand the scope of research ethics to address justice in global health, recent scholarship has sought to clarify how external research actors from high-income countries might discharge their obligation to reduce health disparities between and within countries. An ethical framework—‘research for health justice’—was derived from a theory of justice (the health capability paradigm) and specifies how international clinical research might contribute to improved health and research capacity in host communities. This paper examines whether and how (...)
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  6.  50
    Closing the Translation Gap for Justice Requirements in International Research.B. Pratt, D. Zion, K. M. Lwin, P. Y. Cheah, F. Nosten & B. Loff - 2012 - Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (9):552-558.
    Bioethicists have long debated the content of sponsors and researchers' obligations of justice in international clinical research. However, there has been little empirical investigation as to whether and how obligations of responsiveness, ancillary care, post-trial benefits and research capacity strengthening are upheld in low- and middle-income country settings. In this paper, the authors argue that research ethics guidelines need to be more informed by international research practice. Practical guidance on how to fulfil these obligations is needed if research groups and (...)
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  7. Exploitation and Community Engagement: Can Community Advisory Boards Successfully Assume a Role Minimising Exploitation in International Research?Bridget Pratt, Khin Maung Lwin, Deborah Zion, Francois Nosten, Beatrice Loff & Phaik Yeong Cheah - unknown
     
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