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Joan Woolfrey
West Chester University
  1.  2
    Introduction.Zachary Hoskins & Joan Woolfrey - 2017 - Social Philosophy Today 33:1-5.
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  2.  4
    Editors' Introduction.Zachary Hoskins, Joan Woolfrey & Gregory Hoskins - 2019 - Social Philosophy Today 35:1-5.
  3.  11
    Editors’ Introduction.Zachary Hoskins & Joan Woolfrey - 2018 - Social Philosophy Today 34:1-4.
  4.  19
    The Infectiousness of Hope.Joan Woolfrey - 2015 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 22 (2):94-103.
    Perhaps not wholly unrelatedly to the message of the first Obama presidential campaign, the concept of hope has been receiving increased philosophical attention in recent years. A good bit has been written on honing a definition of hope, and investigating the morally relevant territory. After a brief summary of that literature, I situate myself amongst those who advocate for hope—at its best—as a virtue, and I then suggest that hope seems to have a unique status amongst the virtues insofar as (...)
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  5.  8
    The Primacy of Hope.Joan Woolfrey - 2016 - Social Philosophy Today 32:125-136.
    This paper raises the question of whether there is anything foundational to hopefulness when considering it as a virtue, and uses the Aristotelian distinction between virtue in the “natural sense” and virtue in the “strict sense” to make the claim that hopefulness has a primacy to it. While that primacy rests on the existence of care and responsiveness of community, those caretakers must themselves be possessed of hopefulness, which, at its best will be virtuous.
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  6.  7
    The Primacy of Hope in Advance.Joan Woolfrey - forthcoming - Social Philosophy Today.
  7. Gouges, Olympe De.Joan Woolfrey - 2015 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Olympe de Gouges “Woman has the right to mount the scaffold; she must equally have the right to mount the rostrum” wrote Olympe de Gouges in 1791 in the best known of her writings The Rights of Woman, two years … Continue reading Gouges, Olympe de →.
     
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  8.  14
    Group Moral Agency as Environmental Accountability.Joan Woolfrey - 2008 - Social Philosophy Today 24:69-88.
    If there is such a thing as a virtuous community, as Aristotle would have it, and if members of communities need to understand themselves in relation to community, then we have a large space from within which to grapple with the issues of social responsibility. Iris Marion Young developed a “social connection model” of justice which requires individuals to think outside of the borders of any one society when considering their responsibility to others. Donald Beggs advocates for a “group moral (...)
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  9.  7
    What Happens Now?: Oregon and Physician‐Assisted Suicide.Joan Woolfrey - 1998 - Hastings Center Report 28 (3):9-17.
  10.  2
    Group Moral Agency as Environmental Accountability.Joan Woolfrey - 2008 - Social Philosophy Today 24:69-88.
    If there is such a thing as a virtuous community, as Aristotle would have it, and if members of communities need to understand themselves in relation to community, then we have a large space from within which to grapple with the issues of social responsibility. Iris Marion Young developed a “social connection model” of justice which requires individuals to think outside of the borders of any one society when considering their responsibility to others. Donald Beggs advocates for a “group moral (...)
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  11.  2
    What Price Reproductive Potential?Joan Woolfrey - 1998 - Hastings Center Report 28 (1):47.
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  12. Refusing Evil: The Place of Acuity in Morality.Joan Woolfrey - 1996 - Dissertation, University of Oregon
    Arendt wrote that "to think what we are doing" may make humans "abstain from evil-doing." I suggest that there is more to it than that. Moral Acuity is a phrase I use to discuss how one can know the right thing to do, often practically without thinking, when situations involving evil arise. Evil, for my purposes, refers to the causing of great harm to another. I propose that to be Morally Acute one must have the capacity for independent judgments and (...)
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