Motivation and Will

Edited by Joshua Shepherd (Carleton University, Universitat de Barcelona)
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  1. Agency and Varieties of Felt Necessity.Monique Wonderly - forthcoming - Ethics.
    Felt necessity, or the phenomenon of experiencing some person or object as a felt need, plays important roles in structuring human agency. Philosophical treatments of the relationship between agency and felt necessity have tended to focus on appetitive needs and necessities arising from a particular type of care. I argue that we have much to gain by considering a third underexplored variety of felt necessity that I call “attachment necessity.” Attachment necessity has its own distinct parts to play in structuring (...)
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  2. Quasi-Psychologism About Collective Intention.Matthew Rachar - forthcoming - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice.
    This paper argues that a class of popular views of collective intention, which I call “quasi-psychologism”, faces a problem explaining common intuitions about collective action. Views in this class hold that collective intentions are realized in or constituted by individual, mental, participatory intentions. I argue that this metaphysical commitment entails persistence conditions that are in tension with a purported obligation to notify co-actors before leaving a collective action attested to by participants in experimental research about the interpersonal normativity of collective (...)
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  3. Resolve is Always Effortful.Olivier Massin & Bastien Gauchot - 2021 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 44.
    Ainslie argues there are two main kinds of willpower: suppression, which is necessarily effortful, and resolve, which is not. We agree with the distinction but argue that all resolve is effortful. Alleged cases of effortless resolve are indeed cases of what Ainslie calls habits, namely stable results of prior uses of resolve.
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  4. Increasing Resolution in the Mechanisms of Resolve.Adam Bulley & Daniel L. Schacter - 2021 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 44.
    Ainslie offers an encompassing and compelling account of willpower, although his big-picture view comes occasionally at the cost of low resolution. We comment on ambiguity in the metacognitive and prospective mechanisms of resolve implicated in recursive self-prediction. We hope to show both the necessity and promise of specifying testable cognitive mechanisms of willpower.
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  5. Reply to Commentaries to Willpower with and Without Effort.George Ainslie - 2021 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 44.
    Twenty-six commentators from several disciplines have written on the assumption that choice is determined by comparative valuation in a common denominator of reward, the “competitive marketplace.” There was no apparent disagreement that prospective rewards are discounted hyperbolically, although some found that the resulting predictions could come just as well from other models, including the interpretation of delay as risk and analysis in terms of hot versus cold valuation systems. Several novel ideas emerged.
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  6. Evolving Resolve.Walter Veit & David Spurrett - 2021 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 44.
    The broad spectrum revolution brought greater dependence on skill and knowledge, and more demanding, often social, choices. We adopt Sterelny's account of how cooperative foraging paid the costs associated with longer dependency, and transformed the problem of skill learning. Scaffolded learning can facilitate cognitive control including suppression, whereas scaffolded exchange and trade, including inter-temporal exchange, can help develop resolve.
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  7. Socializing Willpower: Resolve From the Outside In.Stephen Setman & Daniel Kelly - 2021 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 44.
    Ainslie's account of willpower is conspicuously individualistic. Because other people, social influence, and culture appear only peripherally, it risks overlooking what may be resolve's deeply social roots. We identify a general “outside-in” explanatory strategy suggested by a range of recent research into human cognitive evolution, and suggest how it might illuminate the origins and more social aspects of resolve.
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  8. Stress and Imagining Future Selves: Resolve in the Hot/Cool Framework.Janet Metcalfe & William James Jacobs - 2021 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 44.
    Although Ainslie dismisses the hot/cool framework as pertaining only to suppression, it actually also has interesting implications for resolve. Resolve focally involves access to our future selves. This access is a cool system function linked to episodic memory. Thus, factors negatively affecting the cool system, such as stress, are predicted to impact two seemingly unrelated capabilities: willpower and episodic memory.
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  9. More Dynamical and More Symbiotic: Cortico-Striatal Models of Resolve, Suppression, and Routine Habit.Linus Ta-Lun Huang - 2021 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 44.
    I extend Ainslie's core claims with three cortico-striatal models that respectively subserve the key constructs of resolve, suppression, and routine habit. I show that these models suggest a more dynamical and symbiotic relation among the constructs: there are more ways they interact to reinforce willpower, and the temporal dimension of the interactions can often determine the effectiveness of the reinforcement.
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  10. Is “Willpower” a Scientific Concept? Suppressing Temptation Contra Resolution in the Face of Adversity.Elias L. Khalil - 2021 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 44.
    The distinction that Ainslie draws among the triple-phenomena “suppression,” “resolve,” and “habit” is a great advance in decision making theory. But the conceptual machinery “willpower,” and its underpinning distinction between small/soon rewards as opposed to large/later rewards, provides a faulty framework to understand the triple-phenomena.
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  11. The Complex Nature of Willpower and Conceptual Mapping of its Normative Significance in Research on Stress, Addiction, and Dementia.Veljko Dubljević & Shevaun D. Neupert - 2021 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 44.
    Willpower has ramifications for autonomy and mental time-travel. Autonomy presupposes mature powers of volition and the capacity to anticipate future events and consequences of one's actions. Ainslie's study is useful to clarify basic autonomy in addiction and dementia. Furthermore, we show how our study on coping with stress can be applied to suppression and resolve.
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  12. Book Review of Means, Ends, and Persons: The Meaning & Psychological Dimensions of Kant's Humanity Formula by Robert Audi. [REVIEW]Susan V. H. Castro - 2018 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 15 (4):491–494.
    Audi's aim in Means, Ends, and Persons is to introduce an ethics of conduct in which treatment of persons features as a central case. The approach to conduct is inspired by Kant, and there are moments of explicit contact, but this book is not meant to be a work of Kant scholarship. The method of argument consists largely in laying out a system of distinctions that are illustrated and defended by simple, familiar examples. Audi's approach here is a continuation of (...)
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  13. Hope as a Source of Grit.Catherine Rioux - forthcoming - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy.
    Psychologists and philosophers have argued that the capacity for perseverance or “grit” depends both on willpower and on a kind of epistemic resilience. But can a form of hopefulness in one’s future success also constitute a source of grit? I argue that substantial practical hopefulness, as a hope to bring about a desired outcome through exercises of one’s agency, can serve as a distinctive ground for the capacity for perseverance. Gritty agents’ “practical hope” centrally involves an attention-fuelled, risk-inclined weighting of (...)
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  14. The Skill of Translating Thought Into Action: Framing The Problem.Wayne Christensen - 2020 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology:1-27.
    The nature of the cognition-motor interface has been brought to prominence by Butterfill & Sinigaglia, who argue that the representations employed by the cognitive and motor systems should not be able to interact with each other. Here I argue that recent empirical evidence concerning the interface contradicts several of the assumptions incorporated in Butterfill & Sinigaglia’s account, and I seek to develop a theoretical picture that will allow us to explain the structure of the interface presented by this evidence. The (...)
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  15. Self-Control and the Self.Hannah Altehenger - forthcoming - Synthese.
    Prima facie, it seems highly plausible to suppose that there is some kind of constitutive relationship between self-control and the self, i.e., that self-control is “control at the service of the self” or even “control by the self.” This belief is not only attractive from a pre-theoretical standpoint, but it also seems to be supported by theoretical reasons. In particular, there is a natural fit between a certain attractive approach to self-control—the so-called “divided mind approach”—and a certain well-established approach to (...)
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  16. Aristotle on Motion in Incomplete Animals.Daniel Coren - 2020 - Apeiron 53 (3):285-314.
    I explain what Aristotle means when, after puzzling about the matter of motion in incomplete animals, he suggests in De Anima III 11.433b31–434a5 that just as incomplete animals are moved indeterminately, desire and phantasia are present in those animals, but present indeterminately. I argue that self-motion and its directing faculties in incomplete animals differ in degree but not in kind from those of complete animals. I examine how an object of desire differs for an incomplete animal. Using a comparison with (...)
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  17. L'Explication ordinaire des actions humaines.Rémi Clot-Goudard - 2015 - 93100 Montreuil, France: Ithaque.
    En quoi consiste l’explication d’une action ? La question, fondamentale pour toute réflexion méthodologique sur les sciences de l’homme, renvoie d’abord à une pratique commune. Dans nos rapports à autrui, il arrive que la compréhension fasse défaut. C’est alors que surgit le besoin d’explication, afin de comprendre la conduite d’autrui ou encore éclairer les autres sur ce que nous faisons… Qu’est-ce qu’une action intentionnelle ? Les pensées d’un agent causent-elles son comportement ? Comment caractériser le savoir qu’un agent possède de (...)
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  18. Confabulating Reasons.Marianna Bergamaschi Ganapini & Marianna Bergamaschi Ganapini - 2020 - Topoi 39 (1):189-201.
    In this paper, I will focus on a type of confabulation that emerges in relation to questions about mental attitudes whose causes we cannot introspectively access. I argue against two popular views that see confabulations as mainly offering a psychological story about ourselves. On these views, confabulations are the result of either a cause-tracking mechanism or a self-directed mindreading mechanism. In contrast, I propose the view that confabulations are mostly telling a normative story: they are arguments primarily offered to justify (...)
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  19. Reason’s Debt to Freedom: Normative Appraisals, Reasons, and Free WillIshtiyaque HajiOxford University Press, 2012; Ix + 259 Pp. $65.00. [REVIEW]Daniel Haas - 2013 - Dialogue 52 (2):415-416.
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  20. Motor Control and the Causal Relevance of Conscious Will: Libet’s Mind–Brain Theory.B. Ingemar B. Lindahl & Peter Århem - 2019 - Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 39 (1):46-59.
    This article examines three aspects of the problem of understanding Benjamin Libet’s idea of conscious will causally interacting with certain neural activities involved in generating overt bodily movements. The first is to grasp the notion of cause involved, and we suggest a definition. The second is to form an idea of by what neural structure(s) and mechanism(s) a conscious will may control the motor activation. We discuss the possibility that the acts of control have to do with levels of supplementary (...)
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  21. Book Review: Victims and Sinners: Spiritual Roots of Addiction and RecoveryVictims and Sinners: Spiritual Roots of Addiction and Recovery, byMercadanteLinda A.. Westminster John Knox, Louisville, 1996. 220pp. $20.00. ISBN 0-664-25508-6. [REVIEW]Abigail Rian Evans - 1999 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 53 (2):214-216.
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  22. Responsibility Matters.Retribution Reconsidered: More Essays in the Philosophy of Law.Desert.Michael J. Zimmerman, Peter A. French, Jeffrie G. Murphy & George Sher - 1995 - Noûs 29 (2):248.
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  23. Causality and Scientific Explanation. Vol. II.Causality and Determinism. [REVIEW]Marie-Louise Frequegnon - 1975 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 36 (1):141.
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  24. Guidance Control and the Anti-Akrasia Chip.Chris Ovenden - 2018 - Synthese 195 (5):2001-2019.
    According to Fischer and Ravizza, an agent has guidance control over some action A, whenever A is issued from one of their own moderately reasons-responsive mechanisms. This involves two elements: the process P leading to their action being suitably responsive to reasons-; and their taking an attitude towards processes of kind P such that they see themselves as the agents of the behaviour those processes issue. For the purposes of this paper, I assume that guidance control amounts to actually guiding (...)
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  25. Evaluative Beliefs First.Ben Bramble - forthcoming - Oxford Studies in Normative Ethics 8.
    Many philosophers think that it is only because we happen to want or care about things that we think some things of value. We start off caring about things, and then project these desires onto the external world. In this chapter, I make a preliminary case for the opposite view, that it is our evaluative thinking that is prior or comes first. On this view, it is only because we think some things of value that we care about or want (...)
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  26. The Little Nell Problem: Reasonable and Resolute Maintenance of Agent Intentions.Richmond Thomason - 2018 - Synthese 195 (1):433-440.
    The Little Nell Problem was formulated by Drew McDermott in 1982. It reveals unexpected complexities in the interaction of the beliefs and intentions of a planning agent. This paper discusses the problem and proposes a solution.
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  27. The Pertinence of Incontinence.António Zilhão - 2005 - Principia: An International Journal of Epistemology 9 (1-2):193-211.
    In this paper I suggest a reconstruction of the traditional concepts of con-tinent and incontinent action. This reconstruction proceeds along the lines of a standpoint of bounded rationality. My suggestion agrees with some relevant aspects of Davidson’s treatment of this topic. One of these aspects is that incontinent action is typically signalled by the following two subjective experiences: a feeling of surprise towards one’s own action and a difficulty in understanding oneself; another is that incontinence cannot simply be disposed of (...)
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  28. Acali and Acid, Oil and Vinegar: Hume on Contrary Passions.Elizabeth S. Radcliffe - 2017 - In Robert Stern & Alix Cohen (eds.), Thinking about the Emotions : A Philosophical History. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 150-171.
    In this paper, I present a close study of Hume’s treatment of contrary passions, asking questions about his description of the psychology of emotional difference and opposition. In treating this topic, I examine two opposed, but noteworthy, psychological functions that Hume imputes to human beings: sympathy and comparison. In brief, sympathy is the mechanism by which we share others’ feelings, and comparison is the function of our minds by which we find ourselves feeling passions opposed to others’ experiences. Sympathy can (...)
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  29. Libertarian Personal Responsibility: On the Ethics, Practice, and American Politics of Personal Responsibility.Joshua Preiss - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (6):621-645.
    While libertarians affirm personal responsibility as a central moral and political value, libertarian theorists write relatively little about the theory and practice of this value. Focusing on the work of F. A. Hayek and David Schmidtz, this article identifies the core of a libertarian approach to personal responsibility and demonstrates the ways in which this approach entails a radical revision of the ethics and American politics of personal responsibility. Then, I highlight several central implications of this analysis in the American (...)
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  30. New Advances in Causation, Agency, and Moral Responsibility.Fabio Bacchini Massimo Dell'Utri & Stefano Caputo (eds.) - 2014 - Cambridge Scholars Press.
  31. In Control.Simkulet William - 2014 - Philosophical Inquires 2 (1):59-75.
    In George Sher’s recent article “Out of Control”, he discusses a series of 9 cases that he believes illustrates that some agents are uncontroversially morally responsible for actions they “cannot help” but perform (2006: 285). He argues these agents exert partial control over these actions insofar as their actions are determined from their character; but this is no control at all. Here I argue that in each of these cases the agent exerts morally relevant control over her actions and that (...)
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  32. The Compensation Principle.Simkulet William - 2015 - Filosofiska Notiser 2 (1):47-60.
    In "Should Race Matter?," David Boonin proposes the compensation principle: When an agent wrongfully harms another person, she incurs a moral obligation to compensate that person for the harms she has caused. Boonin then argues that the United States government has wrongfully harmed black Americans by adopting pro-slavery laws and other discriminatory laws and practices following the end of slavery, and therefore the United States government has an obligation to pay reparations for slavery and discriminatory laws and practices to those (...)
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  33. Neuroscience and Legal Responsibility.Nicole A. Vincent (ed.) - 2013 - Oup Usa.
    Adopting a broadly compatibilist approach, this volume's authors argue that the behavioral and mind sciences do not threaten the moral foundations of legal responsibility. Rather, these sciences provide fresh insight into human agency and updated criteria as well as powerful diagnostic and intervention tools for assessing and altering minds.
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  34. Personal Responsibility and Lifestyle Diseases.Martin Marchman Andersen & Morten Ebbe Juul Nielsen - 2016 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 41 (5):480-499.
    What does it take for an individual to be personally responsible for behaviors that lead to increased risk of disease? We examine three approaches to responsibility that cover the most important aspects of the discussion of responsibility and spell out what it takes, according to each of them, to be responsible for behaviors leading to increased risk of disease. We show that only what we call the causal approach can adequately accommodate widely shared intuitions to the effect that certain causal (...)
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  35. Bioethics and Moral Agency: On Autonomy and Moral Responsibility.John Skalko & Mark J. Cherry - 2016 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 41 (5):435-443.
    Two clusters of essays in this issue of The Journal of Medicine and Philosophy provide a critical gaze through which to explore central moral, phenomenological, ontological, and political concerns regarding human moral agency and personal responsibility. The first cluster challenges common assumptions in bioethics regarding the voluntariness of human actions. The second set turns the debate towards morally responsible choice within the requirements of distributive justice. The force of their collective analysis leaves us with a well-founded basis critically to approach (...)
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  36. Springs of Action: Understanding Intentional Behavior.Alfred R. Mele - 2002 - Oxford University Press.
    In this book, Alfred Mele tackles some central problems in the philosophy of action. His purpose is to construct an explanatory model for intentional behaviour, locating the place and significance of such mental phenomena as beliefs, desires, reasons and intentions in the etiology of intentional action.
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  37. Responsibility and the Moral Sentiments.R. Jay Wallace - 2002 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 64 (3):680-681.
    Responsibility and the Moral Sentiments offers an account of moral responsibility. It addresses the question: what are the forms of capacity or ability that render us morally accountable for the things we do? A traditional answer has it that the conditions of moral responsibility include freedom of the will, where this in turn involves the availability of robust alternative possibilities. I reject this answer, arguing that the conditions of moral responsibility do not include any condition of alternative possibilities. In the (...)
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  38. Are There Passive Desires?David Wall - 2009 - Dialectica 63 (2):133-155.
    What is the relation between desire and action? According to a traditional, widespread and influential view I call ‘The Motivational Necessity of Desire’, having a desire that p entails being disposed to act in ways that you believe will bring about p. But what about desires like a desire that the committee chooses you without your needing to do anything, or a desire that your child passes her exams on her own? Such ‘self‐passive’ desires are often given as a counter‐example (...)
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  39. The Ethics of Belief and the Morality of Action: Intellectual Responsibility and Rational Disagreement: Robert Audi.Robert Audi - 2011 - Philosophy 86 (1):5-29.
    The contemporary explosion of information makes intellectual responsibility more needed than ever. The uncritical tend to believe too much that is unsubstantiated; the overcritical tend to believe too little that is true. A central problem for this paper is to formulate standards to guide an intellectually rigorous search for a mean between excessive credulity and indiscriminate skepticism. A related problem is to distinguish intellectual responsibility for what we believe from moral responsibility for what we do. A third problem is how (...)
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  40. XI. Emotion, Weakness of Will, and the Normative Conception of Agency1: Karen Jones.Karen Jones - 2003 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 52:181-200.
    Empirical work on and common observation of the emotions tells us that our emotions sometimes key us to the presence of real and important reason-giving considerations without necessarily presenting that information to us in a way susceptible of conscious articulation and, sometimes, even despite our consciously held and internally justified judgment that the situation contains no such reasons. In this paper, I want to explore the implications of the fact that emotions show varying degrees of integration with our conscious agency—from (...)
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  41. Thomism and Scientific Indeterminism.Charles Decruydt De Koninck - 1936 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 12:58.
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  42. On Freedom And Responsibility: Remarks On Sartre, Levinas And Derrida.Holger Zaborowski - 2000 - Heythrop Journal 41 (1):47-65.
    This article looks at some main stages of contemporary thought about freedom and responsibility and outlines an account of important stages of 20th century philosophy as well. Whereas the early Sartre particularly coined the notion of infinite freedom, his later writings, Levinas and Derrida discovered the conception of infinite responsibility. The article draws attention to the questions which arise out of these understandings of both responsibility and freedom and asks whether these issues can be answered from a purely secular point (...)
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  43. FOCUS: The Social Responsibility of Business: Who Are the Responsible Agents?Alfred Kenyon - 1996 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 5 (2):81-86.
    Resolving the strongly polarised debate about whether or not business has social responsibilities may call for distinguishing more clearly between a business as a non‐moral agent with a purely financial raison d'être and its managers who may have wider and more complex commitments. The author worked as a financial manager in industry and taught at City University Business School for many years, and also served on the professional conduct appeal committee of the Institute of Chartered Accountants in England and Wales. (...)
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  44. Now Read This: Book Review Spelling Out Corporate Responsibility. [REVIEW]Jacquie L'Etang - 1993 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 2 (3):172-174.
    Cannon, Tom, Corporate Responsibility, Financial Times, Pitman Publishing, 1992, pp. 265, Hardback £30.00, ISBN 0‐273‐03727‐7.
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  45. The HIV/AIDS Crisis and Corporate Moral Responsibility in the Light of the Levinasian Notions of Proximity and the Third.Conceição Soares - 2007 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 16 (3):278-285.
    This paper focuses on the set of problems regarding the HIV/AIDS crisis in the specific domain of corporate moral responsibility within a context of the Levinasian notion of proximity and the Third. Against a totalitarian, homogeneous society, Levinas opens the way to a social pluralism, which has its sources in the disquiet provoked by the strangeness of the Other's face. Corporate responsibility, understood from this point of view, would not reduce institutional relations to an anonymous world of neutrality. Corporate responsibility (...)
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  46. The Mental Basis of Responsibility.Jon Jacobs - 2003 - Mind 112 (448):711-714.
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  47. Agency and Responsibility: A Common Sense Moral Psychology.Gary Watson - 2002 - Mind 111 (444):876-882.
  48. Freedom as Responsibility: Comments on James Swindler.Kenneth Henley - 2012 - Southwest Philosophy Review 28 (2):47-52.
  49. Responsibility and Control: A Theory of Moral Responsibility. [REVIEW]Brendan Sweetman - 2000 - International Philosophical Quarterly 40 (4):507-509.
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  50. Free Selves, Enriched Values, and Experimental Method: Mead’s Pragmatic Synthesis.Sandra B. Rosenthal - 1992 - International Philosophical Quarterly 32 (1):79-93.
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1 — 50 / 1957