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  1.  10
    Locke: political essays.John Locke & Mark Goldie - 1997 - New York: Cambridge University Press. Edited by Mark Goldie.
    This book brings together a comprehensive collection of the writings of one of the greatest philosophers in the Western tradition. Along with five of John Locke's major essays, seventy shorter essays are included that stand outside the canonical works that Locke published during his lifetime. For the first time students will be able to fully explore the evolution of Locke's ideas concerning the philosophical foundations of morality and sociability, the boundary of church and state, the shaping of constitutions, and the (...)
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  2.  12
    The Clarendon Edition of the Works of John Locke.Mark Goldie - 2021 - Locke Studies 21:1-5.
    It has been some years since Locke Studies published an update on the Clarendon Edition. The current state of the Edition is given here. Two volumes will appear within the next eighteen months: J. R. Milton’s edition of the Abridgements of the Essay and Mark Goldie’s edition of The Correspondence of John Locke, vol. 9, Supplement.
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  3.  26
    John Locke, the early Lockeans, and priestcraft.Mark Goldie - 2018 - Intellectual History Review 28 (1):125-144.
  4.  10
    John Locke: selected correspondence.John Locke, Mark Goldie & Esmond Samuel De Beer - 2002 - New York: Oxford University Press. Edited by Mark Goldie.
    "John Locke (1632-1704) was a prolific correspondent and he left behind him over 3,600 letters, a collection almost unmatched in pre-modern times. A man of insatiable curiosity and wide social connections, his letters open up the cultural, social, intellectual, and political worlds of the later Stuart age. Spanning half a century, they mark the transition from the era of revolutionary Puritanism to the dawn of the Enlightenment. This book brings together 244 of the most important and revealing letters. Half of (...)
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  5. The Roots of True Whiggism 1688-94.Mark Goldie - 1980 - History of Political Thought 1 (2):195-236.
     
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  6.  15
    Locke and America.Mark Goldie - 2015 - In Matthew Stuart (ed.), A Companion to Locke. Hoboken, NJ, USA: Wiley. pp. 546–563.
    This chapter first summarizes John Locke's personal connections with America, alerting that biography cannot determine authorial intention or philosophical coherence. Next, it surveys Locke's preoccupation with anthropology, noting that his attitude to non‐Europeans was by no means wholly negative. Locke's political and moral philosophy was richly informed by literature we would today call anthropological. The chapter then sketches early‐modern arguments for empire, in order to exclude some possibilities from Locke's repertoire, before turning to Locke's manifesto for English agrarian development in (...)
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  7. Absolutism.Mark Goldie - 2011 - In George Klosko (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of the History of Political Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
     
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  8.  7
    A Biographical Dictionary of Tutors at the Dissenters' Private Academies, 1660–1729.Mark Goldie - 2014 - History of European Ideas 40 (7):1004-1006.
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  9. Distribution lists for copies of Locke's books and Boyle's general history of the air.Mark Goldie - 2004 - Locke Studies 4:235-242.
  10.  17
    John Locke: Selected Correspondence.Mark Goldie (ed.) - 2002 - New York: Clarendon Press.
    John Locke is perhaps the greatest philosopher in the English language. A political activist in a revolutionary age, Locke's prolific correspondence opens up the cultural, social, intellectual, and political worlds of the later Stuart era. Spanning half a century, the letters trace the transition from Puritanism to the Enlightenment. A man of insatiable curiosity, Locke's letters encompass science, education, travel, religion, and the birth of the British empire.
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  11.  7
    Locke's Life.Mark Goldie - 2015 - In Matthew Stuart (ed.), A Companion to Locke. Hoboken, NJ, USA: Wiley. pp. 25–44.
    John Locke was born in Wrington and brought up in nearby Pensford, a village six miles south of Bristol. In 1647 Locke entered England's finest school,Westminster, under the renowned Richard Busby. At the close of his life, he recommended not only the New Testament but also Cicero's De Officiis (On Duties) as the best guides to morality. Locke always regarded civil and ecclesiastical governance as two equally consequential aspects of public life. Locke's political identity in aligned him with the "Junto" (...)
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  12. Printing history of Locke's writings 1686-1800.Mark Goldie - 2005 - Locke Studies 5:215-221.
     
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  13.  13
    Politics, religion and ideas in seventeenth- and eighteenth-century Britain: essays in honour of Mark Goldie.Mark Goldie, Justin Champion, John Coffey, Tim Harris & John Marshall (eds.) - 2019 - New York: The Boydell Press.
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  14.  15
    The reception of Locke's politics.Mark Goldie (ed.) - 1999 - Brookfield, Vt.: Pickering & Chatto.
    v. 1. The Glorious Revolution defended, 1690-1704 -- v. 2. Patriarchalism, the social contract and civic virtue, 1705-1760 -- v. 3. The Age of the American Revolution, 1760-1780 -- v. 4. Political reform in the Age of the French Revolution, 1780-1838 -- v. 5. The church, dissent and religious toleration, 1689-1773 -- v. 6. Wealth, property and commerce, 1696-1832.
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  15.  19
    Second Treatise of Government and a Letter Concerning Toleration.Mark Goldie (ed.) - 2016 - Oxford University Press UK.
    'Man being born...to perfect freedom...hath by nature a power...to preserve his property, that is, his life, liberty and estate.'Locke's Second Treatise of Government is one of the great classics of political philosophy, widely regarded as the foundational text of modern liberalism. In it Locke insists on majority rule, and regards no government as legitimate unless it has the consent of the people. He sets aside people's ethnicities, religions, and cultures and envisages political societies which command our assent because they meet (...)
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