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  1. The Effectiveness of Business Codes: A Critical Examination of Existing Studies and the Development of an Integrated Research Model. [REVIEW]Muel Kaptein & Mark S. Schwartz - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 77 (2):111 - 127.
    Business codes are a widely used management instrument. Research into the effectiveness of business codes has, however, produced conflicting results. The main reasons for the divergent findings are: varying definitions of key terms; deficiencies in the empirical data and methodologies used; and a lack of theory. In this paper, we propose an integrated research model and suggest directions for future research.
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  2.  97
    A Code of Ethics for Corporatecode of Ethics.Mark S. Schwartz - 2002 - Journal of Business Ethics 41 (1-2):27 - 43.
    Are corporate codes of ethics necessarily ethical? To challenge this notion, an initial set of universal moral standards is proposed by which all corporate codes of ethics can be ethically evaluated. The set of universal moral standards includes: (1) trustworthiness; (2) respect; (3) responsibility; (4) fairness; (5) caring; and (6) citizenship. By applying the six moral standards to four different stages of code development (i.e., content, creation, implementation, administration), a code of ethics for corporate codes of ethics is constructed by (...)
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  3.  22
    The "Ethics" of Ethical Investing.Mark S. Schwartz - 2003 - Journal of Business Ethics 43 (3):195 - 213.
    There appears to be an implicit assumption by those connected with the ethical investment movement (e.g., ethical investment firms, individual investors, social investment organizations, academia, and the media), that ethical investment is in fact ethical. This paper will attempt to challenge the notion that the ethical mutual fund industry, as currently taking place, is acting in an ethical manner. Ethical issues such as the transparency of the funds and advertising are discussed. Ethical mutual fund screens such as tobacco, alcohol, gambling, (...)
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  4. Universal Moral Values for Corporate Codes of Ethics.Mark S. Schwartz - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 59 (1-2):27-44.
    How can one establish if a corporate code of ethics is ethical in terms of its content? One important first step might be the establishment of core universal moral values by which corporate codes of ethics can be ethically constructed and evaluated. Following a review of normative research on corporate codes of ethics, a set of universal moral values is generated by considering three sources: (1) corporate codes of ethics; (2) global codes of ethics; and (3) the business ethics literature. (...)
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  5. Effective Corporate Codes of Ethics: Perceptions of Code Users.Mark S. Schwartz - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics 55 (4):321-341.
    The study examines employee, managerial, and ethics officer perceptions regarding their companies codes of ethics. The study moves beyond examining the mere existence of a code of ethics to consider the role that code content and code process (i.e. creation, implementation, and administration) might play with respect to the effectiveness of codes in influencing behavior. Fifty-seven in-depth, semi-structured interviews of employees, managers, and ethics officers were conducted at four large Canadian companies. The factors viewed by respondents to be important with (...)
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  6. Ethical Investing From a Jewish Perspective.Mark S. Schwartz, Meir Tamari & Daniel Schwab - 2007 - Business and Society Review 112 (1):137-161.
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  7.  57
    Tone at the Top: An Ethics Code for Directors?Mark S. Schwartz, Thomas W. Dunfee & Michael J. Kline - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 58 (1-3):79-100.
    . Recent corporate scandals have focused the attention of a broad set of constituencies on reforming corporate governance. Boards of directors play a leading role in corporate governance and any significant reforms must encompass their role. To date, most reform proposals have targeted the legal, rather than the ethical obligations of directors. Legal reforms without proper attention to ethical obligations will likely prove ineffectual. The ethical role of directors is critical. Directors have overall responsibility for the ethics and compliance programs (...)
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  8.  28
    "Corporate Efforts to Tackle Corruption: An Impossible Task?" The Contribution of Thomas Dunfee. [REVIEW]Mark S. Schwartz - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 88 (4):823 - 832.
    Thomas W. Dunfee, in addition to his many other contributions to business ethics literature, has (along with several co-authors) generated a stream of research that attempts to tackle the issue of corruption. Dunfee's research on corruption includes three primary contributions: (1) the introduction of "Integrative Social Contract Theory" which provides a normative theoretical framework by which to judge the morality of global business activity including corruption; (2) the "C2 Principles" (Combating Corruption), which outline specific content and implementation measures that corporations (...)
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  9.  83
    Should Firms Go 'Beyond Profits'? Milton Friedman Versus Broad CSR.Mark S. Schwartz & David Saiia - 2011 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 22 (1):327-338.
    The paper explores the ongoing debate between the narrow version of CSR proposed by Milton Friedman and the broader version of CSR, which includes additional ethical and/or philanthropic obligations. Implications are then discussed.
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  10.  31
    The State of Business Ethics in Israel: A Light Unto the Nations? [REVIEW]Mark S. Schwartz - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 105 (4):429-446.
    Whether the nation of Israel has become a “light unto the nations” in terms of ethical behavior among its business community remains in doubt. To examine the current state of business ethics in Israel, the study examines the following: (1) the extent of business ethics education in Israel; (2) the existence of formal corporate ethics program elements based on an annual survey of over 50 large Israeli corporations conducted over 5 years (2006–2010); and (3) perceptions of the state of business (...)
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  11.  27
    What Can We Learn From the U.S. Federal Sentencing Guidelines for Organizational Ethics.Dove Izraeli & Mark S. Schwartz - 1998 - Journal of Business Ethics 17 (9-10):1045-1055.
    In November, 1991, the U.S. Congress enacted the U.S. Federal Sentencing Guidelines legislation which had a dramatic impact on corporate America. Can the Guidelines be used as a model or framework by other countries? Could other countries in the world benefit from adopting a similar piece of legislation? Are there any limitations to consider? In addressing these issues, the authors make the argument that the time has arrived for other countries to consider the development of legislation similar to the Guidelines (...)
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  12.  47
    God as a Managerial Stakeholder?Mark S. Schwartz - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 66 (2/3):291 - 306.
    Can or should God be considered a managerial stakeholder? While at first glance such a proposition might seem beyond the norms of stakeholder management theory or traditional management practice, further investigation suggests that there might be both theoretical and practical support for such a notion. This paper will make the argument that God both is and should be considered a managerial stakeholder for those businesspeople and business firms that accept that God exists and can affect the world. In doing so, (...)
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  13.  78
    C. Corporal Social Responsibility: A Three Domain Approach.Mark S. Schwartz & Alrchie B. Carroll - 2008 - Business Ethics 13:1-22.
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  14. Tone at the Top: An Ethics Code Thomas W Dmfie.Mark S. Schwartz - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 58:79-100.
     
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  15.  16
    A Business Ethics National Index (BENI) Measuring Business Ethics Activity Around the World.Mark S. Schwartz & James Weber - 2006 - Business and Society 45 (3):382-405.
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  16.  19
    Ethical Decision-Making Theory: An Integrated Approach.Mark S. Schwartz - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics.
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  17.  61
    Corporate Governance, Ethics, and the Backdating of Stock Options.Avshalom M. Adam & Mark S. Schwartz - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 85 (1):225 - 237.
    Backdating of stock options is an example of an agency problem. It has emerged despite all the measures (i.e., new regulations and additional corporate governance mechanisms) aimed at addressing such problems? Beyond such negative controlling measures, a more positive empowering approach based on ethics may also be necessary. What ethical measures need to be taken to address the agency problem? What values and norms should guide the board of directors in protecting the shareholders' interests? To examine these issues, we first (...)
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  18.  31
    The Morality of Whistleblowing: A Commentary on Richard T. De George.W. Michael Hoffman & Mark S. Schwartz - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 127 (4):771-781.
  19.  1
    The Effectiveness of Business Codes: A Critical Examination of Existing Studies and the Development of an Integrated Research Model.Muel Kaptein & Mark S. Schwartz - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 77 (2):111-127.
    Business codes are a widely used management instrument. Research into the effectiveness of business codes has, however, produced conflicting results. The main reasons for the divergent findings are: varying definitions of key terms; deficiencies in the empirical data and methodologies used; and a lack of theory. In this paper, we propose an integrated research model and suggest directions for future research.
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  20.  10
    Inculcating Values-Based Leadership.Mark S. Schwartz - 2006 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 17:37-42.
    When it comes to the establishment of an ethical corporate culture, there appear to be at least two inter-related foundational requirements: (1) the existence of an explicit set of core ethical values; and (2) the presence of ethical leadership, i.e., an ethical ‘tone at the top.’ Some companies appear, however, to have been more successful than others when it comes to establishing an appropriate ‘tone at the top’, i.e., leaders who behave according to an explicit set of core ethical values. (...)
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  21.  6
    Should Firms Go “Beyond Profits”? Milton Friedman Versus Broad CSR1.Mark S. Schwartz & David Saiia - 2012 - Business and Society Review 117 (1):1-31.
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  22.  17
    Business Ethics Training Using 'The Difficult Hiring Decision' Case.Mark S. Schwartz - 2007 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 18:541-544.
    When it comes to business ethics training, several alternative approaches are available. This study examines the use of one particular case, “The Difficult HiringDecision,” for training business executives as well as MBA students. The study finds that the process of analyzing the case can lead to new insights regarding the importance of business ethics and ethical values in a firm’s ethical corporate culture.
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  23. “Corporate Efforts to Tackle Corruption: An Impossible Task?” The Contribution of Thomas Dunfee.Mark S. Schwartz - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 88 (S4):823-832.
    Thomas W. Dunfee, in addition to his many other contributions to business ethics literature, has generated a stream of research that attempts to tackle the issue of corruption. Dunfee's research on corruption includes three primary contributions: the introduction of "Integrative Social Contract Theory" which provides a normative theoretical framework by which to judge the morality of global business activity including corruption; the "C2 Principles", which outline specific content and implementation measures that corporations can voluntarily adopt to combat corruption; and a (...)
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  24. Corporate Social Responsibility: An Ethical Approach.Mark S. Schwartz - 2011 - Broadview Press.
    The term corporate social responsibility is often used in the boardroom, classroom, and political platform, but what does it really mean? Do corporations have ethical or philanthropic duties beyond their obligations to comply with the law? How does CSR relate to business ethics, stakeholder management, sustainability, and corporate citizenship? Mark Schwartz provides a concise, cutting-edge introduction to the topic, analyzing many case studies with the help of his innovative "Three Domain Approach" to CSR. Corporate Social Responsibility also provides a chronology (...)
     
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  25. Institutional Forces Affecting Corporate Social Responsibility Behavior of the Chinese Food Industry.Yuju Wu, Mark S. Schwartz & Wei Zuo - 2017 - Business and Society 56 (5):705-737.
    Food safety problems in China, such as deadly tainted milk, have attracted growing attention from a corporate social responsibility perspective. To examine the forces that potentially drive CSR behavior within the Chinese food industry, our study is organized as follows. First, a review is conducted on the unique history of CSR in China as well as some of the major Chinese food scandals that have taken place. The primary drivers of CSR in China that have been suggested in the literature (...)
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