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  1.  25
    The Transcendence of Fate in Plato and in Seneca.Panos Eliopoulos - 2011 - Philosophical Inquiry 34 (1-2):91-100.
    Even though Heimarmene is the natural order of things, as it is claimed in the Laws; and although the human being has to participate in that order, as it is written in Timaeus; Plato, at times, tends to be willing to rupture that circle of necessity, that the "naturality" of Heimarmene enforces on man, by finding a potential escape. The human soul is the unambiguous vehicle of this effort. In the writings of the Stoic Seneca, the transcendence of Fate is (...)
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  2.  12
    The Epicurean Views on the Human Soul in Lucretius’ De Rerum Natura.Panos Eliopoulos - 2015 - Dialogue and Universalism 25 (1):30-37.
    Epicurean physics elaborates on a system of universal kinetics as regards the creation of the world. One of the main principles is that there is no genesis without motion. The human being, as all other beings, is the product of the motion of atoms within the cosmic void. Due to a sudden swerve in the motion of some atoms, it can be upheld, according to the Epicureans and Lucretius, that there is no determinism in the universe and the human being (...)
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  3.  18
    The Concept of Non-Violence in the Philosophy of the Imperial Stoa.Panos Eliopoulos - 2011 - Philosophy Study 1 (1):28-40.
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  4.  7
    Seneca on Virtue as Psychological Therapy and the Causes of Passions.Panos Eliopoulos - 2015 - Philosophical Inquiry 39 (2):49-56.
    Even though he generally agrees with Chrysippus on the matter of the ontology of passions, Seneca differentiates mainly in his emphasis that passions are the reason why man leads an inauthentic, unhappy and undignified life. Although Seneca is a very orthodox Stoic, in most of the cases where his stoic credibility is challenged, he resorts to a therapy plan that exceeds the usual stoic strictness on the absoluteness of the status of the sage. In this scheme, the Roman philosopher employs (...)
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  5.  7
    The Anti-Plato of Charles Baudelaire.Panos Eliopoulos - 2013 - Dialogue and Universalism 23 (4):173-180.
    In Charles Baudelaire’s poetry there is only one direct reference to Plato. The French poet juxtaposes the joy of the senses to the ascetic, as he perceives it, pursuit of the Platonic Good. This juxtaposition is taking place not only with the aid of ethical terms, but principally through their transformation into aesthetic ones. For Baudelaire, the absence of the metaphysical or symbolical light is tautological to beauty, but also a firm ground where the poet stands upon for his artistic (...)
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  6.  2
    Prologue.Christopher Vasillopulos & Panos Eliopoulos - 2015 - Dialogue and Universalism 25 (1):7-8.
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