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Sheri Alpert [7]Sheri A. Alpert [4]
  1.  48
    Extending Our View on Using BCIs for Locked-in Syndrome.Andrew Fenton & Sheri Alpert - 2008 - Neuroethics 1 (2):119-132.
    Locked-in syndrome (LIS) is a severe neurological condition that typically leaves a patient unable to move, talk and, in many cases, initiate communication. Brain Computer Interfaces (or BCIs) promise to enable individuals with conditions like LIS to re-engage with their physical and social worlds. In this paper we will use extended mind theory to offer a way of seeing the potential of BCIs when attached to, or implanted in, individuals with LIS. In particular, we will contend that functionally integrated BCIs (...)
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  2.  61
    Neuroethics and Nanoethics: Do We Risk Ethical Myopia? [REVIEW]Sheri Alpert - 2008 - Neuroethics 1 (1):55-68.
    In recent years, two distinct trajectories of bioethical inquiry have emerged: neuroethics and nanoethics. The former deals with issues in neuroscience, whereas the latter deals with issues in nanoscience and nanotechnology. In both cases, the ethical inquiries have coalesced in response to rapidly increasing scientific and engineering developments in each field. Both also present major issues for contemplation in bioethics. However, the questions are (1) how different are the ethical issues raised, and (2) is it beneficial for neuroethics and nanoethics (...)
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  3.  25
    Total Information Awareness-Forgotten but Not Gone: Lessons for Neuroethics.Sheri Alpert - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (5):24 – 26.
  4.  1
    Patient Preferences in Controlling Access to Their Electronic Health Records: A Prospective Cohort Study in Primary Care.Peter H. Schwartz, Kelly Caine, Sheri A. Alpert, Eric M. Meslin, Aaron E. Carroll & William M. Tierney - 2015 - Journal of General Internal Medicine 30:25-30.
    Introduction: Previous studies have measured individuals’ willingness to share personal information stored in an electronic health record (EHR) with healthcare providers. But none have measured preferences when patients’ choices determine access by healthcare providers. -/- Methods: Patients were given the ability to control the access of doctors, nurses or other staff in a primary care clinic to personal information stored in an EHR. Patients could restrict access to all personal data or to specific types of sensitive information, and could restrict (...)
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  5.  1
    Provider Responses to Patients Controlling Access to Their Electronic Health Records: A Prospective Cohort Study in Primary Care.William M. Tierney, Sheri A. Alpert, Amy Byrket, Kelly Caine, Jeremy C. Leventhal, Eric M. Meslin & Peter H. Schwartz - 2015 - Journal of General Internal Medicine 30 (1):31-37.
    Applying Fair Information Practice principles to electronic health records (EHRs) requires allowing patient control over who views their data.
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  6.  60
    Doctoral Essays in Computer Ethics.Sheri A. Alpert - 1996 - Science and Engineering Ethics 2 (2):225-247.
    Computer technologies are having a profoundly transforming effect on how the United States federal government operates. As technologies become more sophisticated, Federal agencies are becoming more innovative, devising creative ways to use these technologies for program delivery. One hopes that the near-term effect of these technology applications will be more efficient operation of government, the goal that generally leads to their implementation.
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  7.  19
    Privacy Issues in Clinical Genomic Medicine, or Marcus Welby, M.D., Meets the $1000 Genome. [REVIEW]Sheri Alpert - 2008 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 17 (4):373-384.
    We have all heard a refrain much like this one over the last decade, increasingly so, as the cost of genetic sequencing has been drastically reduced with improvements in associated techniques and technologies. Already, discoveries are being made in laboratories that can help doctors determine from which drug a particular patient will receive the most efficacious treatment. The working presumption is that, eventually, individuals’ genetic sequence information will be included in each of their personal medical records.
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  8.  7
    Smart Cards, Smarter Policy: Medical Records, Privacy, and Health Care Reform.Sheri Alpert - 1993 - Hastings Center Report 23 (6):13-23.
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  9.  8
    Brain Privacy: How Can We Protect It?Sheri Alpert - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (9):70-73.
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  10. Giving Patients Granular Control of Personal Health Information: Using an Ethics ‘Points to Consider’ to Inform Informatics System Designers.Eric M. Meslin, Sheri A. Alpert, Aaron E. Carroll, Jere D. Odell, William M. Tierney & Peter H. Schwartz - 2013 - International Journal of Medical Informatics 82:1136-1143.
    Objective: There are benefits and risks of giving patients more granular control of their personal health information in electronic health record (EHR) systems. When designing EHR systems and policies, informaticists and system developers must balance these benefits and risks. Ethical considerations should be an explicit part of this balancing. Our objective was to develop a structured ethics framework to accomplish this. -/- Methods: We reviewed existing literature on the ethical and policy issues, developed an ethics framework called a “Points to (...)
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