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  1. Don Dedrick & Lana Trick (eds.) (2009). Computation, Cognition, and Pylyshyn. The Mit Press.
    A collection of cutting-edge work on cognition and a celebration of a foundational figure in the field.
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  2. Don Dedrick (2003). Productance Physicalism and a Posteriori Necessity. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (1):28-29.
    The problem of nonreflectors perceived as colored is the central problem for Byrne & Hilbert's (B&H's) physicalism. Vision scientists and other interested parties need to consider the motivation for their account of “productance physicalism.” Is B&H's theory motivated by scientific concerns or by philosophical interests intended to preserve a physicalist account of color as a posteriori necessary?
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  3. Debi Roberson, Ian Davies, Jules Davidoff, Arnold Henselmans, Don Dedrick, Alan Costall, Angus Gellatly, Paul Whittle, Patrick Heelan, Rainer Mausfeld, Jaap van Brakel, Thomas Johansen, Hans Kraml, Joseph Wachelder, Friedrich Steinle, Ton Derksen, Tom Seppalainen, Sean Johnston, Charles de Weert & Lieven Decock (2002). Theories, Technologies, Instrumentalities of Color: Anthropological and Historiographic Perspectives. University Press of America.
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  4. Don Dedrick (2001). “Whatever... ”. Dialogue 40 (2):367-374.
     
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  5. Don Dedrick (2001). “Whatever …”: A Reply to Albahari. Dialogue 40 (02):367-.
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  6. Don Dedrick (2000). C. L. Hardin and Luisa Maffi, Eds, Color Categories in Thought and Language; Robert Maclaury, Color and Cognition in Mesoamerica: Constructing Categories as Vantages. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 10 (3):423-430.
  7. Don Dedrick (1999). Jules Davidoff, Cognition Through Color, Issues in the Biology of Language and Cognition Series. Minds and Machines 9 (2):280-286.
  8. Don Dedrick (1998). [Book Chapter].
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  9. Don Dedrick (1998). Culture in Cognitive Science. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (4):571-572.
    A concern for cultural specificity, the staple of traditional anthropological research, survives the transition to domain-specific accounts of cognitive structuring such as Atran's, and is arguably better off for having made the transition. The identification of domain-specific processes provide us with criteria for sorting cultural differences and integrating cultural concerns within cognitive science.
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  10. Don Dedrick (1998). Introduction. In [Book Chapter].
    Is there a universal biolinguistic disposition for the development of "basic" colour words? This question has been a subject of debate since Brent Berlin and Paul Kay's BASIC COLOR TERMS: THEIR UNIVERSALITY AND EVOLUTION was published in 1969. NAMING THE RAINBOW is the first extended study of this debate. The author describes and criticizes empirically and conceptually unified models of colour naming that relate basic colour terms directly to perceptual and ultimately to physiological facts, arguing that this strategy has overlooked (...)
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  11. Don Dedrick (1998). The Foundations of the Universalist Tradition in Color-Naming Research (and Their Supposed Refutation. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 28 (2):179-204.
    In Basic Color Terms, Berlin and Kay argued for a restricted number of "basic" color words—words they claimed to be culturally universal. This claim about language was buttressed by psychologist Eleanor Rosch's famous work on color prototypes. Together, the works of Berlin and Kay and Rosch are the foundation for a contemporary research tradition investigating the biological foundations of color naming. In this article, the author describes some common objections to the works of Berlin and Kay and Rosch and argues (...)
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  12. Don Dedrick (1997). Colour Categorization and the Space Between Perception and Language. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (2):187-188.
    We need to reconsider and reconceive the path that will take us from innate perceptual saliencies to basic (and perhaps other) colour language. There is a space between the perceptual and the linguistic levels that needs to be filled by an account of the rules that people use to generate relatively stable reference classes in a social context.
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  13. Don Dedrick (1997). DR Oldroyd, Darwinian Impacts Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 17 (5):358-359.
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  14. Don Dedrick, Review of C. L. Hardin and Luissa Maffi, Editors, Color Categories in Thought and Language. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1997 & Robert Maclaury, Color and Cognition in Mesoamerica: Constructing Categories as Vantages. Austin: University of Texas. [REVIEW]
    In a message posted to one of the cognitive science discussion groups the author asked, to paraphrase roughly, what should be read to get an up-to-date account of research into color naming? My advice is (and was) to consider the two books under review here: C. L. Hardin and Luisa Maffi’s excellent collection of essays on color language research; Robert MacLaury’s magnum opus on color naming and cognition.
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  15. Don Dedrick (1996). Can Color Be Reduced to Anything? Philosophy of Science Supplement 3 (3):134-42.
    C. L. Hardin has argued that the colour opponency of the vision system leads to chromatic subjectivism: chromatic sensory states reduce to neurophysiological states. Much of the force of Hardin's argument derives from a critique of chromatic objectivism. On this view chromatic sensory states are held to reduce to an external property. While I agree with Hardin's critique of objectivism it is far from clear that the problems which beset objectivism do not apply to the subjectivist position as well. I (...)
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  16. Don Dedrick (1996). Color Language Universality and Evolution: On the Explanation for Basic Color Terms. Philosophical Psychology 9 (4):497 – 524.
    Since the publication of Brent Berlin and Paul Kay's Basic color terms in 1969 there has been continuing debate as to whether or not there are linguistic universals in the restricted domain of color naming. In this paper I am primarily concerned with the attempt to explain the existence of basic color terms in languages. That project utilizes psychological and ultimately physiological generalizations in the explanation of linguistic regularities. The main problem with this strategy is that it cannot account for (...)
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  17. Don Dedrick (1995). Objectivism and the Evolutionary Value of Color Vision. Dialogue 34 (1):35-44.
    In Color for Philosophers C. L. Hardin argues that chromatic objectivism?a view which identifies colour with some or other property of objects?must be false. The upshot of Hardin's argument is this: there is, in fact, no principled correlation between physical properties and perceived colours. Since that correlation is a minimal condition for objectivism, objectivism is false. Mohan Matthen, who accepts Hardin's conclusion for what can be called "simple objectivism," takes it that an adaptationist theory of biological function applied to colour (...)
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  18. Don Dedrick (1993). The New Naturalism. Metaphilosophy 24 (4):390-399.
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