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Andrew C. Wicks [33]Andrew Carpenter Wicks [1]
  1. What Stakeholder Theory is Not.Andrew C. Wicks - 2003 - Business Ethics Quarterly 13 (4):479-502.
    The term stakeholder is a powerful one. This is due, to a significant degree, to its conceptual breadth. The term means differentthings to different people and hence evokes praise or scorn from a wide variety of scholars and practitioners. Such breadth of interpretation, though one of stakeholder theory’s greatest strengths, is also one of its most prominent theoretical liabilities. The goal of the current paper is like that of a controlled burn that clears away some of the underbrush of misinterpretation (...)
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  2. Stakeholder Theory, Value, and Firm Performance.Jeffrey S. Harrison & Andrew C. Wicks - 2013 - Business Ethics Quarterly 23 (1):97-124.
    This paper argues that the notion of value has been overly simplified and narrowed to focus on economic returns. Stakeholder theory provides an appropriate lens for considering a more complex perspective of the value that stakeholders seek as well as new ways to measure it. We develop a four-factor perspective for defining value that includes, but extends beyond, the economic value stakeholders seek. To highlight its distinctiveness, we compare this perspective to three other popular performance perspectives. Recommendations are made regarding (...)
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  3.  12
    Can Multi-Stakeholder Initiatives Improve Global Supply Chains? Improving Deliberative Capacity with a Stakeholder Orientation.Vivek Soundararajan, Jill A. Brown & Andrew C. Wicks - 2019 - Business Ethics Quarterly 29 (3):385-412.
    ABSTRACT:Global multi-stakeholder initiatives are important instruments that have the potential to improve the social and environmental sustainability of global supply chains. However, they often fail to comprehensively address the needs and interests of various supply-chain participants. While voluntary in nature, MSIs have most often been implemented through coercive approaches, resulting in friction among their participants and in systemic problems with decoupling. Additionally, in those cases in which deliberation was constrained between and amongst participants, collaborative approaches have often failed to materialize. (...)
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  4.  62
    Corporate and Stakeholder Responsibility: Making Business Ethics A Two-Way Conversation.Andrew C. Wicks - 2007 - Business Ethics Quarterly 17 (3):375-398.
    In this article we revisit the notion of stakeholder responsibility as a way to highlight the role that stakeholders have in creating anethical business context. We argue for modifying the prevailing focus on corporate responsibility to stakeholders, and giving more serious attention to the importance of stakeholder responsibility—to firms, and to other stakeholders who are part of the collective enterprise. We elaborate why stakeholder responsibility matters, and suggest how making stakeholder responsibility a central focus of academics and practitioners can redefine (...)
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  5.  20
    Overcoming the Separation Thesis The Needfor a Reconsideration of Business and Society Research.Andrew C. Wicks - 1996 - Business and Society 35 (1):89-118.
  6.  13
    Guest Editors’ Introduction Individual and Organizational Reintegration After Ethical or Legal Transgressions: Challenges and Opportunities.Jerry Goodstein, Kenneth D. Butterfield, Michael D. Pfarrer & Andrew C. Wicks - 2014 - Business Ethics Quarterly 24 (3):315-342.
    ABSTRACT:In this article we set the context for this special issue focusing on individual and organizational reintegration in the aftermath of transgressions that violate ethical and legal boundaries. Following a brief introduction to the topic we provide an overview of each of the four articles selected for this special issue. We then present a number of potentially fruitful empirical, theoretical, and normative directions management and ethics scholars might pursue in order to further advance this evolving literature.
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  7.  18
    People and Profits: The Impact of Corporate Objectives on Employees’ Need Satisfaction at Work.Bidhan L. Parmar, Adrian Keevil & Andrew C. Wicks - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 154 (1):13-33.
    For decades, scholars have debated the corporate objective. Scholars have either advocated a corporate objective focused on generating value for shareholders or creating value for multiple groups of stakeholders. Although it has been established that the corporate objective can shape many aspects of the corporation—including culture, compensation, and decision making—to date, scholars have not yet explored its psychological impact; particularly, how the corporate objective might influence employee well-being. In this article, we explore how two views of the corporate objective affect (...)
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  8.  11
    Harmful Stakeholder Strategies.Jeffrey S. Harrison & Andrew C. Wicks - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 169 (3):405-419.
    Stakeholder theory focuses on how more value is created if stakeholder relationships are governed by ethical principles such as integrity, respect, fairness, generosity and inclusiveness. However, it has not adequately addressed strategies that stakeholders perceive as harmful to their interests and how this perception can even lead some stakeholders to view the firm’s strategies as unethical. To fill the void, this paper directly addresses strategies that stakeholders perceive as harmful to their interests, or what we refer to as harmful stakeholder (...)
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  9.  11
    Business Ethics: A Managerial Approach.Andrew C. Wicks (ed.) - 2009 - Prentice-Hall.
    For undergraduate business ethics courses. The ethical training business students need to be successful in today's challenging business world. Recent scandals have created a mistrust that has spread through the entire business sector, jeopardizing public confidence in the stock market and economy. Now more than ever, it's important for students to understand the moral foundations, rules, and implications that are vital to the core of business. Business Ethics 1e presents an in-depth introduction of business ethics that emphasizes the role of (...)
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  10.  23
    Reflections on the Practical Relevance of Feminist Thought to Business.Andrew C. Wicks - 1996 - Business Ethics Quarterly 6 (4):523-531.
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  11.  5
    Spheres of Influence: A Walzerian Approach to Business Ethics.Andrew C. Wicks, Patricia H. Werhane, Heather Elms & John Nolan - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 174 (1):1-14.
    Michael Walzer is one of the most distinguished political philosophers and social critics of this century. His ideas have had great import and influence in political philosophy and political discussion, yet very few of his ideas have been incorporated explicitly into the business ethics literature. We argue that Walzer’s work provides an important conceptual canvas for business ethics scholars that has not been adequately explored. Scholars in business ethics often borrow from political theory and philosophy to generate new insights and (...)
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  12.  33
    On MacIntyre, Modernity and the Virtues: A Reply to Dobson.Andrew C. Wicks - 1997 - Business Ethics Quarterly 7 (4):133-135.
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  13.  28
    The Business Ethics Movement: "Where Are We Headed and What Can We Learn From Our Colleagues in Bioethics?".Andrew C. Wicks - 1995 - Business Ethics Quarterly 5 (3):603-620.
    There is a long and distinguished history of ethical thought in both business and medicine dating back to ancient times. Yet, the emergence of distinct academic disciplines ("business ethics" and "bioethics") which are also tied to broader social movements is a very recent phenomenon. In spite of the apparent affinities that would seem to emerge from this connection, many have argued that the differences between business and medicine make any constructive interaction between business ethics and bioethics minimal. Indeed, little has (...)
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  14.  42
    Norman Bowie and Richard Rorty on Multinationals: Does Business Ethics Need 'Metaphysical Comfort?'. [REVIEW]Andrew C. Wicks - 1990 - Journal of Business Ethics 9 (3):191 - 200.
    Norman Bowie wrote an article on the moral obligations of multinational corporations in 1987. This paper is a response to Bowie, but more importantly, it is designed to articulate the force and substance of the pragmatist philosophy developed by Richard Rorty. In his article, Bowie suggested that moral universalism (which he endorses) is the only credible method of doing business ethics across cultures and that cultural relativism and ethnocentrism are not. Bowie, in a manner surprisingly common among contemporary philosophers, lumps (...)
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  15.  28
    The Business Ethics Movement: Where Are We Headed and What Can We Learn From Our Colleagues in Bioethics?Andrew C. Wicks - 1995 - Business Ethics Quarterly 5 (3):603-620.
    There is a long and distinguished history of ethical thought in both business and medicine dating back to ancient times. Yet, the emergence of distinct academic disciplines [“business ethics” and “bioethics”) which are also tied to broader social movements is a very recent phenomenon. In spite of the apparent affinities that would seem to emerge from this connection, many have argued that the differences between business and medicine make any constructive interaction between business ethics and bioethics minimal. Indeed, little has (...)
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  16.  36
    Albert Schweitzer or Ivan Boesky? Why We Should Reject the Dichotomy Between Medicine and Business.Andrew C. Wicks - 1995 - Journal of Business Ethics 14 (5):339 - 351.
    Several critics have maintained that there are some critical differences between the ethics of medicine and the ethics of business such that health care should remain as free as possible from the influence of business. In particular, it has been suggested that the core moral identity of those in medical practice, and their accompanying institutions, are not only antagonistic, but effectively opposed to their counterparts in business. This paper attempts to challenge such a sharp contrast and suggests that a reformulation, (...)
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  17.  13
    An Evaluation of Journal Quality: The Perspective of Business Ethics Researchers.Andrew C. Wicks & Robbin Derry - 1996 - Business Ethics Quarterly 6 (3):359-371.
    The subject of journal quality has received little attention in the business ethics literature. While there are reasons for this past neglect, there are important new considerations which make it vital that researchers now address this topic. First, virtually all business school departments use evaluations of journal quality as an important indicator of scholarly achievement, yet business ethics has no such studies. Second, as many schools are beginning to ask ethicists to publish in the wider management literature, it is important (...)
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  18.  21
    When Worlds Collide: Medicine, Business, the Affordable Care Act and the Future of Health Care in the U.S.Andrew C. Wicks & Adrian A. C. Keevil - 2014 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 42 (4):420-430.
    Many observers claim that business has become a powerful force in medicine and that the future of health care cannot escape that reality, even though some scholars lament it. The U.S. recently experienced the most devastating recession since the Great Depression. As health care costs rise, we face additional pressure to rein in health care spending. We also have important new legislation that could well mark a significant shift in how health care is provided and who has access to care, (...)
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  19.  22
    When Worlds Collide: Medicine, Business, the Affordable Care Act and the Future of Health Care in the U.S.Andrew C. Wicks & Adrian A. C. Keevil - 2014 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 42 (4):420-430.
    The dialogue about the future of health care in the US has been impeded by flawed conceptions about medicine and business. The present paper re-examines some of the underlying assumptions about both medicine and business, and uses more nuanced readings of both terms to frame debates about the ACA and the emerging health care environment.
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  20.  36
    Ethics and Incentives: An Evaluation and Development of Stakeholder Theory in the Health Care Industry.Andrew C. Wicks - 2002 - Business Ethics Quarterly 12 (4):413-432.
    This paper utilizes a qualitative case study of the health care industry and a recent legal case to demonstrate that stakeholder theory’s focus on ethics, without recognition of the effects of incentives, severely limits the theory’s ability to provide managerial direction and explain managerial behavior. While ethics provide a basis for stakeholder prioritization, incentives influence whether managerial action is consistent with that prioritization. Our health care examples highlight this and other limitations of stakeholder theory and demonstrate the explanatory and directive (...)
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  21.  47
    Ethics and Incentives: An Evaluation and Development of Stakeholder Theory in the Health Care Industry.Heather Elms, Shawn Berman & Andrew C. Wicks - 2002 - Business Ethics Quarterly 12 (4):413-432.
    Abstract: This paper utilizes a qualitative case study of the health care industry and a recent legal case to demonstrate that stakeholder theory’s focus on ethics, without recognition of the effects of incentives, severely limits the theory’s ability to provide managerial direction and explain managerial behavior. While ethics provide a basis for stakeholder prioritization, incentives influence whether managerial action is consistent with that prioritization. Our health care examples highlight this and other limitations of stakeholder theory and demonstrate the explanatory and (...)
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  22.  25
    The Value Dynamics of Total Quality Management: Ethics and the Foundations of TQM.Andrew C. Wicks - 2001 - Business Ethics Quarterly 11 (3):501-535.
    Total Quality Management (TQM) has been the object of extensive discussion within the popular literature and is increasingly of interest among management scholars. Recent scholarship has focused on the theoretical foundations of TQM, particularly what makes it work, why so many firms have had problems implementing it, and under what circumstances it may create a sustainable advantage for individual firms. This paper extends the work in theory development regarding TQM and offers an empirically testable theoretical model of its function. The (...)
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  23.  14
    Cooperating with the Disempowered Using ESOPS to Forge a Stakeholder Relationship by Anchoring Employee Trust in Workplace Participation Programs.Richard S. Marens, Andrew C. Wicks & Vandra L. Huber - 1999 - Business and Society 38 (1):51-82.
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  24.  6
    In Search of Experts: A Conception of Expertise for Business Ethics Consultation.Andrew C. Wicks & Paul L. Glezen - 1998 - Business Ethics Quarterly 8 (1):105-126.
    This paper explores the subject of ethics expertise. We suggest that this is a topic which has been badly neglected despite ongoing discussions about subjects which presuppose a particular conception of expertise . In addition, given significant challenges to any conception of ethical expertise, we try to determine whether it is possible to provide a meaningful and substantive account of it. The paper moves from more abstract discussion of the idea to grounding a particular model, providing substance to it, and (...)
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  25.  3
    The Moral Imagination of Patricia Werhane: A Festschrift.R. Edward Freeman, Sergiy Dmytriyev, Andrew C. Wicks, James R. Freeland, Richard T. De George, Norman E. Bowie, Ronald F. Duska, Edwin M. Hartman, Timothy J. Hargrave, Mark S. Schwartz, W. Michael Hoffman, Michael E. Gorman, Mollie Painter-Morland, Carla J. Manno, Howard Harris, David Bevan & Patricia H. Werhane - 2018 - Springer Verlag.
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  26.  52
    How Kantian a Theory of Kantian Capitalism?Andrew C. Wicks - 1998 - The Ruffin Series of the Society for Business Ethics 1998:61-73.
  27.  36
    How Kantian a Theory of Kantian Capitalism?: A Response to Bowie’s Ruffin Lecture.Andrew C. Wicks - 1998 - The Ruffin Series of the Society for Business Ethics 1:61-73.
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  28. How Kantian a Theory of Kantian Capitalism?: A Response to Bowie’s Ruffin Lecture.Andrew C. Wicks - 1998 - Business Ethics Quarterly 8 (S1):61-73.
    In his Ruffin Lecture, Bowie attempts to offer a Kantian theory of capitalism, and this strikes me as a constructive and important thing to do. Bowie’s proposal contributes to a new direction in research that I believe is critical: offering alternative interpretations of capitalism, specifically, theories based in moral concepts which are designed to make room for normative inquiry. In contrast, much of the work in business ethics has focused on the application of moral principles or ideas to specific problems (...)
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