Results for 'Criminal law Philosophy'

989 found
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  1.  26
    Criminal Law, Philosophy and Public Health Practice.A. M. Viens, John Coggon & Anthony S. Kessel (eds.) - 2013 - Cambridge University Press.
    The goal of improving public health involves the use of different tools, with the law being one way to influence the activities of institutions and individuals. Of the regulatory mechanisms afforded by law to achieve this end, criminal law remains a perennial mechanism to delimit the scope of individual and group conduct. However, criminal law may promote or hinder public health goals, and its use raises a number of complex questions that merit exploration. This examination of the interface (...)
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  2. Criminal law, philosophy, and psychology : working at the cross-roads.Thomas Nadelhoffer - 2011 - In Leslie Green & Brian Leiter (eds.), Oxford Studies in Philosophy of Law. New York: Oxford University Press.
     
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  3. Criminal Law, Philosophy, and Psychology: Working At the Cross-roads.Thomas Nadelhoffer - 2011 - In Leslie Green & Brian Leiter (eds.), Oxford Studies in Philosophy of Law: Volume 1. Oxford University Press.
     
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  4.  7
    Criminal law in the age of the administrative state.Vincent Chiao - 2019 - New York, NY: Oxford University Press.
    Criminal law as public law -- Criminal law as public law -- Criminal law as public law -- Mass incarceration and the theory of punishment -- Reasons to criminalize -- Formalism and pragmatism in criminal procedure -- Responsibility without resentment.
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  5.  43
    International Criminal Law and Philosophy.Larry May & Zachary Hoskins (eds.) - 2010 - Cambridge University Press.
    International Criminal Law and Philosophy is the first anthology to bring together legal and philosophical theorists to examine the normative and conceptual foundations of international criminal law. In particular, through these essays the international group of authors addresses questions of state sovereignty; of groups, rather than individuals, as perpetrators and victims of international crimes; of international criminal law and the promotion of human rights and social justice; and of what comes after international criminal prosecutions, namely, (...)
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  6.  38
    Rethinking Criminal Law Theory: New Canadian Perspectives in the Philosophy of Domestic, Transnational, and International Criminal Law.Francois Tanguay-Renaud & James Stribopoulos (eds.) - 2012 - Hart Publishing.
    In the last two decades, the philosophy of criminal law has undergone a vibrant revival in Canada. The adoption of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms has given the Supreme Court of Canada unprecedented latitude to engage with principles of legal, moral, and political philosophy when elaborating its criminal law jurisprudence. Canadian scholars have followed suit by paying increased attention to the philosophical foundations of domestic criminal law. Because of Canada's leadership in international criminal (...)
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  7.  96
    The philosophy of criminal law: selected essays.Douglas N. Husak - 2010 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    Does criminal liability require an act? -- Motive and criminal liability -- The costs to criminal theory of supposing that intentions are irrelevant to permissibility -- Transferred intent -- The nature and justifiability of nonconsummate offenses -- Strict liability, justice, and proportionality -- The sequential principle of relative culpability -- Willful ignorance, knowledge, and the equal culpability thesis : a study of the significance of the principle of legality -- Rapes without rapists : consent and reasonable mistake (...)
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  8. Understanding Criminal Law through the Lens of Reason: Gardner, John. 2007. Offences and Defences: Selected Essays in the Philosophy of Criminal Law. Oxford: Oxford University Press, xiv + 288 pp.François Tanguay-Renaud - 2010 - Res Publica 16 (1):89-98.
    This is a review essay of Gardner, John. 2007, Offences and Defences: Selected Essays in the Philosophy of Criminal Law, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 288 pp.
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  9.  67
    Philosophy of criminal law.Douglas N. Husak - 1987 - Totowa, N.J.: Rowman & Littlefield.
    This volume collects 17 of Douglas Husak's influential essays in criminal law theory. The essays span Husak's original and provocative contributions to the central topics in the field, including the grounds of criminal liability, relative culpability, the role of defences, and the justification of punishment. The volume includes an extended introduction by the author, drawing together the themes of his work, and exploring the goals of criminal theory.
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  10.  5
    Act and Crime: The Philosophy of Action and its Implications for Criminal Law.Michael S. Moore - 2010 - Oxford University Press UK.
    In print for the first time in over ten years, Act and Crime provides a unified account of the theory of action presupposed by both Anglo-American criminal law and the morality that underlies it. The book defends the view that human actions are always volitionally caused bodily movements and nothing else. The theory is used to illuminate three major problems in the drafting and the interpretation of criminal codes: 1) what the voluntary act requirement both does and should (...)
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  11.  89
    Philosophy and the criminal law: principle and critique.Antony Duff (ed.) - 1998 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    Five pre-eminent legal theorists tackle a range of fundamental questions on the nature of the philosophy of criminal law. Their essays explore the extent to which and the ways in which our systems of criminal law can be seen as rational and principled. The essays discuss some of the principles by which, it is often thought, a system of law should be structured, and they ask whether our own systems are genuinely principled or riven by basic contradictions, (...)
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  12. Offences and defences: selected essays in the philosophy of criminal law.John Gardner - 2007 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    The wrongness of rape -- Rationality and the rule of law in offences against the person -- Complicity and causality -- In defence of defences -- Justifications and reasons -- The gist of excuses -- Fletcher on offences and defences -- Provocation and pluralism -- The mark of responsibility -- The functions and justifications of criminal law and punishment -- Crime : in proportion and in perspective -- Reply to critics.
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  13.  6
    Philosophy and the Criminal Law: Principle and Critique.R. A. Duff (ed.) - 1998 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    Five pre-eminent legal theorists tackle a range of fundamental questions on the nature of the philosophy of criminal law. Their essays explore the extent to which and the ways in which our systems of criminal law can be seen as rational and principled. The essays discuss some of the principles by which, it is often thought, a system of law should be structured, and they ask whether our own systems are genuinely principled or riven by basic contradictions, (...)
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  14.  87
    Criminal law theory: doctrines of the general part.Stephen Shute & Andrew Simester (eds.) - 2002 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    Written by leading philosophers and lawyers from the United States and the United Kingdom, this collection of original essays offers new insights into the doctrines that make up the general part of the criminal law. It sheds theoretical light on the diversity and unity of the general part and advances our understanding of such key issues as criminalisation, omissions, voluntary actions, knowledge, belief, reckelssness, duress, self-defence, entrapment and officially-induced mistake of law.
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  15.  10
    Criminal Law Without Punishment: How Our Society Might Benefit From Abolishing Punitive Sanctions.Valerij Zisman - 2023 - De Gruyter.
    How can criminal punishment be morally justified? Zisman addresses this classical question in legal philosophy. He provides two maybe surprising answers to the question. First, as for a methodological claim, it argues that this question cannot be answered by philosophers and legal scholars alone. Rather, we need to take into account research from social psychology, economy, anthropology, and so on in order to properly analyze the arguments in defense of criminal punishment. Second, the book argues that when (...)
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  16.  24
    Redoing Criminal Law: Taking the Deviant Turn.Leo Katz & Alvaro Sandroni - 2022 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 16 (3):429-439.
    This is a review of Larry Alexander and Kim Ferzan’s _Reflections on Crime and Culpability_, a sequel to the authors’ _Crime and Culpability_. The two books set out a sweeping proposal for reforming our criminal law in ways that are at once commonsensical and mindbogglingly radical. But even if one is not on board with such a radical experiment, simply thinking it through holds many unexpected lessons: startlingly new insights about the current regime and about novel ways of doing (...)
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  17.  4
    Foundational texts in modern criminal law.Markus Dirk Dubber (ed.) - 2014 - Oxford, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press.
    Foundational Texts in Modern Criminal Law presents essays in which scholars from various countries and legal systems engage critically with formative texts in criminal legal thought since Hobbes. It examines the emergence of a transnational canon of criminal law by documenting its intellectual and disciplinary history and provides a snapshot of contemporary work on criminal law within that historical and comparative context. Criminal law discourse has become, and will continue to become, more international and comparative, (...)
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  18.  10
    Fundamentals of criminal law: responsibility, culpability, and wrongdoing.Andrew Simester - 2021 - Oxford, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press.
    Written by a noted expert in criminal law, this book explores the philosophical underpinnings of the law's major doctrines concerning actus reus, mens rea, and defences, showing that they are not always driven by culpability. They are grounded also in principles of moral responsibility, ascriptive responsibility, and wrongdoing. As such, they engage wider debates about wrongdoing, and about the boundaries between liability and freedom. This multi-textured analysis allows this book to take more nuanced positions about many important controversies in (...)
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  19. Act and Crime: The Philosophy of Action and its Implications for Criminal Law.Michael S. Moore - 1993 - Oxford University Press.
    This work provides, for the first time, a unified account of the theory of action presupposed by both British and American criminal law and its underlying morality. It defends the view that human actions are volitionally caused body movements. This theory illuminates three major problems in drafting and implementing criminal law--what the voluntary act requirement does and should require, what complex descriptions of actions prohibited by criminal codes both do and should require, and when the two actions (...)
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  20.  28
    Criminal Law Exceptionalism as an Affirmative Ideology, and its Expansionist Discontents.Christoph Burchard - 2023 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 17 (1):17-27.
    Criminal law exceptionalism, or so I suggest, has turned into an ideology in German and Continental criminal law theory. It rests on interrelated claims about the (ideal or real) extraordinary qualities and properties of the criminal law and has led to exceptional doctrines in constitutional criminal law and criminal law theory. It prima facie paradoxically perpetuates and conserves the criminal law, and all too often leads to ideological thoughtlessness, which may blind us to the (...)
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  21.  25
    Criminal Law Exceptionalism: Introduction.Christoph Burchard & Antony Duff - 2023 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 17 (1):3-4.
    Criminal law exceptionalism, or so I suggest, has turned into an ideology in German and Continental criminal law theory. It rests on interrelated claims about the (ideal or real) extraordinary qualities and properties of the criminal law and has led to exceptional doctrines in constitutional criminal law and criminal law theory. It prima facie paradoxically perpetuates and conserves the criminal law, and all too often leads to ideological thoughtlessness, which may blind us to the (...)
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  22. Terrorizing Criminal Law.Lucia Zedner - 2014 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 8 (1):99-121.
    The essays in Waldron’s Torture, Terror, and Trade-Offs have important implications for debates about the criminalization of terrorism and terrorism-related offences and its consequences for criminal law and criminal justice. His reflections on security speak directly to contemporary debates about the preventive role of the criminal law. And his analysis of inter-personal security trade-offs invites much closer attention to the costs of counter-terrorism policies, particularly those pursued outside the criminal process. But is Waldron right to speak (...)
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  23.  15
    The New Philosophy of Criminal Law.Chad Flanders & Zachary Hoskins (eds.) - 2015 - London, UK: Rowman & Littlefield International.
    This volume is a collection of twelve new essays, authored by leading philosophers and legal theorists, examining the central conceptual and normative questions underlying our institutions of criminal law.
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  24. The grammar of criminal law: American, comparative, and international.George P. Fletcher - 2007 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    The Grammar of Criminal Law is a 3-volume work that addresses the field of international and comparative criminal law, with its primary focus on the issues of international concern, ranging from genocide, to domestic efforts to combat terrorism, to torture, and to other international crimes. The first volume is devoted to foundational issues. The Grammar of Criminal Law is unique in its systematic emphasis on the relationship between language and legal theory; there is no comparable comparative study (...)
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  25.  7
    Criminal law.Thomas Morawetz (ed.) - 1991 - New York, NY: New York University Press.
    This Major Reference series brings together a wide range of key international articles in law and legal theory. Many of these essays are not readily accessible, and their presentation in these volumes will provide a vital new resource for both research and teaching. Each volume is edited by leading international authorities who explain the significance and context of articles in an informative and complete introduction.
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  26.  98
    Theorizing Criminal Law Reform.Roger A. Shiner - 2009 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 3 (2):167-186.
    How are we to understand criminal law reform? The idea seems simple—the criminal law on the books is wrong: it should be changed. But 'wrong’ how? By what norms 'wrong’? As soon as one tries to answer those questions, the issue becomes more complex. One kind of answer is that the criminal law is substantively wrong: that is, we assume valid norms of background political morality, and we argue that doctrinally the criminal law on the books (...)
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  27.  45
    Intention, Agency and Criminal Liability: Philosophy of Action and the Criminal Law.Anthony Kenny & R. A. Duff - 1991 - Philosophical Quarterly 41 (164):378.
  28. The Philosophy of Criminal Law.Larry Alexander - 2004 - In Jules Coleman & Scott Shapiro (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Jurisprudence and Philosophy of Law. Oxford University Press.
     
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  29.  10
    Criminal Law Theory: Introduction.Mark Dsouza, Alon Harel & Re’em Segev - forthcoming - Criminal Law and Philosophy:1-4.
    This is an introduction to the special issue on criminal law theory.
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  30.  48
    Attempts: In the Philosophy of Action and the Criminal Law.Gideon Yaffe - 2010 - Oxford, GB: Oxford University Press.
    Gideon Yaffe presents a ground-breaking work which demonstrates the importance of philosophy of action for the law. Many people are serving sentences not for completing crimes, but for trying to. Yaffe's clear account of what it is to try to do something promises to resolve the difficulties courts face in the adjudication of attempted crimes.
  31. Philosophy of Criminal Law.Larry Alexander - 2002 - In Jules Coleman & Scott J. Shapiro (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Jurisprudence & Philosophy of Law. Oxford University Press.
     
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  32. Philosophy of Criminal Law.Larry Alexander - 2002 - In Jules Coleman & Scott J. Shapiro (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Jurisprudence and Philosophy of Law. Oxford University Press.
     
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  33. The Philosophy of Criminal Law.Larry Alexander - 2004 - In Jules Coleman & Scott Shapiro (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Jurisprudence & Philosophy of Law. Oxford University Press.
     
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  34.  36
    European criminal law and European identity.Mireille Hildebrandt - 2007 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 1 (1):57-78.
    This contribution aims to explain how European Criminal Law can be understood as constitutive of European identity. Instead of starting from European identity as a given, it provides a philosophical analysis of the construction of self-identity in relation to criminal law and legal tradition. The argument will be that the self-identity of those that share jurisdiction depends on and nourishes the legal tradition they adhere to and develop, while criminal jurisdiction is of crucial importance in this process (...)
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  35.  23
    Emergencies and criminal law in Kant's legal philosophy.Thomas Mertens - 2017 - Ethic@ - An International Journal for Moral Philosophy 16 (3):459-474.
    Despite Kant's explicit statement that every murderer must suffer death, there are at least four situations to be found in Kant's work in which the killing of a human being should not lead to the death penalty: when too many murderers are involved; when a mother kills her illegitimate child; when one duellist kills the other; when one person pushes another off a plank in order to save his life. This paper discusses these situation and concentrates on the last situation (...)
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  36.  31
    What is Philosophy of Criminal Law?: John Deigh and David Dolinko: The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Criminal Law.Youngjae Lee - 2014 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 8 (3):671-685.
    Introduction: State-Centered and Individual-Centered TheoriesWhat is philosophy of criminal law? The seventeen essays in this book, as a whole, provide an excellent place to start in answering that question. Editors John Deigh and David Dolinko state that they put together this volume of “seventeen original essays by leading thinkers in the philosophy of the criminal law” in order to create “an authoritative handbook” representing “the state of current research on the major topics in the field that (...)
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  37.  21
    Criminal Law and Penal Law: The Wrongness Constraint and a Complementary Forfeiture Model.Alec Walen - 2020 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 14 (3):431-446.
    Antony Duff’s The Realm of Criminal Law offers an appealing moral reconstruction of the criminal law. I agree that the criminal law should be understood to predicate punishment upon sufficient proof that the defendant has committed a public wrong for which she is being held to account and censured. But the criminal law is not only about censoring people for public wrongs; it must serve other purposes as well, such as preventing people from committing serious crimes (...)
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  38.  48
    International Criminal Law and Philosophy[REVIEW]Mark R. Reiff - 2011 - Social Theory and Practice 37 (2):370-378.
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  39.  7
    Philosophy and the criminal law.Antony Duff & N. E. Simmonds (eds.) - 1984 - Wiesbaden: Steiner.
    Tenth annual conference at the University of Manchester, 8th-10th April 1983.
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  40.  5
    Criminal law theory.Douglas Husak - 2004 - In Martin P. Golding & William A. Edmundson (eds.), The Blackwell Guide to the Philosophy of Law and Legal Theory. Oxford, UK: Blackwell. pp. 107–121.
    This chapter contains section titled: The Need for a Theory of Criminalization The Nature of the Criminal Law Inadequate Theories of Criminalization A Better Approach to Criminalization References Further Reading.
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  41.  48
    The Oxford Handbook of the Philosophy of the Criminal Law.John Deigh & David Dolinko (eds.) - 2011 - Oxford University Press.
    This is the first comprehensive handbook in the philosophy of criminal law. It contains seventeen original essays by leading thinkers in the field and covers the field's major topics including limits to criminalization, obscenity and hate speech, blackmail, the law of rape, attempts, accomplice liability, causation, responsibility, justification and excuse, duress, provocation and self-defense, insanity, punishment, the death penalty, mercy, and preventive detention and other alternatives to punishment. It will be an invaluable resource for scholars and students whose (...)
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  42.  20
    Why International Criminal Law Can and Should be Conceived With Supra-Positive Law: The Non-Positivistic Nature of International Criminal Legality.Nuria Pastor Muñoz - 2023 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 17 (2):381-406.
    International criminal law (ICL) is an achievement, but at the same time a challenge to the traditional conception of the principle of legality (_lex praevia_, _scripta_, and _stricta_ – Sect. 1). International criminal tribunals have often based conviction for international crimes on unwritten norms the existence and scope of which they have failed to substantiate. In so doing, they have evaded the objection that they were applying _ex post facto_ criminal laws. This approach, the relaxation of the (...)
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  43.  18
    Philosophical Foundations of Criminal Law.R. A. Duff & Stuart Green (eds.) - 2011 - New York: Oxford University Press UK.
    25 leading contemporary theorists of criminal law tackle a range of foundational issues about the proper aims and structure of the criminal law in a liberal democracy. The challenges facing criminal law are many. There are crises of over-criminalization and over-imprisonment; penal policy has become so politicized that it is difficult to find any clear consensus on what aims the criminal law can properly serve; governments seeking to protect their citizens in the face of a range (...)
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  44.  27
    A Criminal Law for Semicitizens.Ivó Coca-Vila & Cristián Irarrázaval - 2021 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 39 (1):56-72.
    Journal of Applied Philosophy, EarlyView.
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  45. Crime and Culpability: A Theory of Criminal Law.Larry Alexander, Kimberly Kessler Ferzan & Stephen J. Morse - 2009 - New York: Cambridge University Press. Edited by Kimberly Kessler Ferzan & Stephen J. Morse.
    This book presents a comprehensive overview of what the criminal law would look like if organised around the principle that those who deserve punishment should receive punishment commensurate with, but no greater than, that which they deserve. Larry Alexander and Kimberly Kessler Ferzan argue that desert is a function of the actor's culpability, and that culpability is a function of the risks of harm to protected interests that the actor believes he is imposing and his reasons for acting in (...)
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  46.  3
    The theoretical and philosophical foundations of criminal law.David Dolinko (ed.) - 2014 - Farnham, Surrey, England: Ashgate.
    This volume offers a selection of significant and influential research articles from the contemporary philosophical debate over the fundamental concepts and structures of Anglo-American criminal law. The articles consider the moral legitimacy of punishment, excuse and justification defenses and the conundrums of attempt liability, the bases of culpability and criminal responsibility and the appropriate limits of the criminal law. The introduction clarifies the contexts in which these subjects are discussed, and the volume includes an extensive bibliography.
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  47.  11
    Criminal Law Guilt and Ontological Guilt: A Heideggerian Perspective.Charis N. Papacharalambous - 2022 - Law and Critique 33 (2):149-173.
    The paper deals with the notion of guilt according to Heidegger’s philosophy and its repercussions for the understanding of guilt according to criminal law doctrine and theory. Heidegger’s notion on guilt is tantamount to Dasein’s incapacity to exhaust all its existential possibilities, whereas legal guilt has to do only with man’s legal indebtedness, which is an aspect of inauthenticity, a deficient mode of ontological responsibility. This does not mean, though, sheer amoralism or apologetics to violence. In late Heidegger (...)
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  48.  50
    Modeling Criminal Law.Ronald J. Allen - 2010 - Law and Philosophy 29 (4):469-481.
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  49.  9
    International Criminal Law and Philosophy, Larry May and Zachary Hoskins, eds. , 268 pp., $88 cloth. [REVIEW]Pablo Kalmanovitz - 2011 - Ethics and International Affairs 25 (1):87-89.
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  50. The Foundations of Criminal Law Epistemology.Lewis Ross - 2022 - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy 9.
    Legal epistemology has been an area of great philosophical growth since the turn of the century. But recently, a number of philosophers have argued the entire project is misguided, claiming that it relies on an illicit transposition of the norms of individual epistemology to the legal arena. This paper uses these objections as a foil to consider the foundations of legal epistemology, particularly as it applies to the criminal law. The aim is to clarify the fundamental commitments of legal (...)
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