11 found
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  1. What is the environment in environmental health research? Perspectives from the ethics of science.David M. Frank - 2021 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 88 (C):172-180.
    Environmental health research produces scientific knowledge about environmental hazards crucial for public health and environmental justice movements that seek to prevent or reduce exposure to these hazards. The environment in environmental health research is conceptualized as the range of possible social, biological, chemical, and/or physical hazards or risks to human health, some of which merit study due to factors such as their probability and severity, the feasibility of their remediation, and injustice in their distribution. This paper explores the ethics of (...)
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  2. Ethics of the scientist qua policy advisor: inductive risk, uncertainty, and catastrophe in climate economics.David M. Frank - 2019 - Synthese:3123-3138.
    This paper discusses ethical issues surrounding Integrated Assessment Models (IAMs) of the economic effects of climate change, and how climate economists acting as policy advisors ought to represent the uncertain possibility of catastrophe. Some climate economists, especially Martin Weitzman, have argued for a precautionary approach where avoiding catastrophe should structure climate economists’ welfare analysis. This paper details ethical arguments that justify this approach, showing how Weitzman’s “fat tail” probabilities of climate catastrophe pose ethical problems for widely used IAMs. The main (...)
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  3. Disagreement or denialism? “Invasive species denialism” and ethical disagreement in science.David M. Frank - 2019 - Synthese 198 (Suppl 25):6085-6113.
    Recently, invasion biologists have argued that some of the skepticism expressed in the scientific and lay literatures about the risks of invasive species and other aspects of the consensus within invasion biology is a kind of science denialism. This paper presents an argument that, while some claims made by skeptics of invasion biology share important features with paradigm cases of science denialism, others express legitimate ethical concerns that, even if one disagrees, should not be dismissed as denialist. Further, this case (...)
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  4. Making Uncertainties Explicit: the Jeffreyan Value-Free Ideal and its Limits.David M. Frank - 2017 - In Kevin Christopher Elliott & Ted Richards (eds.), Exploring Inductive Risk: Case Studies of Values in Science. New York: Oup Usa.
    According to Richard Jeffrey’s value-free ideal, scientists should avoid making value judgments about inductive risks by offering explicit representations of scientific uncertainty to decision-makers, who can use these to make decisions according to their own values. Some philosophers have responded by arguing that higher-order inductive risks arise in the process of producing representations of uncertainty. This chapter explores this line of argument and its limits, arguing that the Jeffreyan value-free ideal is achievable in contexts where methodological decisions introduce minimal higher-order (...)
     
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  5.  49
    Logical fallacies and reasonable debates in invasion biology: a response to Guiaşu and Tindale.David M. Frank, Daniel Simberloff, Jordan Bush, Angela Chuang & Christy Leppanen - 2019 - Biology and Philosophy 34 (5):1-11.
    This critical note responds to Guiaşu and Tindale’s “Logical fallacies and invasion biology,” from our perspective as ecologists and philosophers of science engaged in debates about invasion biology and invasive species. We agree that “the level of charges and dismissals” surrounding these debates might be “unhealthy” and that “it will be very difficult for dialogues to move forward unless genuine attempts are made to understand the positions being held and to clarify the terms involved.” Although they raise several important scientific, (...)
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  6. 'Biodiversity’ and Biological Diversities: Consequences of Pluralism Between Biology and Policy.David M. Frank - 2017 - In Justin Garson, Sahotra Sarkar & Anya Plutynski (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Biodiversity. New York, NY, USA: pp. 96-109.
  7.  34
    Science and values in the biodiversity-ecosystem function debate.David M. Frank - 2022 - Biology and Philosophy 37 (2):1-22.
    This paper explores interactions between ecological science and conservation values in the biodiversity-ecosystem function debate of the 1990–2000s. The scientific debate concerned the interpretation of observed correlations between species richness and ecosystem properties like primary productivity in experimental ecosystems. The debate over the causal or explanatory role of species richness was presumed to have implications for conservation policy, and the use of such research to support policy recommendations generated hostility between rival groups of ecologists. I argue that the debate was (...)
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  8.  20
    Bad Conservation Research Is Unethical Conservation Research: Comment on “Ethics of Species Research and Preservation” by Rob Irvine.David M. Frank - 2013 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (4):539-540.
  9.  22
    Conservation Goals and Species Preservation: Uncertainty and Multiple Values.David M. Frank - 2013 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 16 (1):19-21.
    The author argues that species preservation should be deemphasized as an ecosystem management goal, due to its infeasibility in the context of rapid ecological change under plausible scenarios of g...
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  10.  21
    A Guide to Field Philosophy: Case Studies and Practical Strategies. Edited by Evelyn Brister and Robert Frodeman. New York: Routledge, 2020. Pp. xviii + 377. [REVIEW]David M. Frank - 2021 - Metaphilosophy 52 (2):321-325.
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    Sustainability for a Warming Planet. [REVIEW]David M. Frank - 2018 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 21 (3):400-404.
    ABSTRACTThis article reviews Humberto Llavador, John Roemer, and Joaquim Silvistre’s 2015 book on the economics of climate change, Sustainability for a Warming Planet. While the book is written for economists, its arguments should be of interest to environmental philosophers and interdisciplinary scholars of climate change. After summarizing the book’s chapters, I offer modest criticisms and a brief commentary on the scope and limits of economic modeling of climate change decisions.
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