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  1.  3
    The Ways of Confucianism: Investigations in Chinese Philosophy.David S. Nivison - 1996 - Open Court Publishing.
    "Nivison brings out the exciting variety within Confucian thought, as he interprets and elucidates key thinkers from over two thousand years, from Confucius himself, through Mencius and Xunzi, to such later Confucians as Wang Yangming, Dai Zhen, and Zhang Xuecheng."--Cover.
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  2.  11
    The World of Thought in Ancient China.David S. Nivison - 1988 - Philosophy East and West 38 (4):411-419.
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  3. Ethics in the Confucian Tradition: The Thought of Mencius and Wang Yangming.Philip J. Ivanhoe, David S. Nivison, Bryan W. Van Norden, R. P. Peerenboom & Henry Rosemont - 2000 - Journal of Religious Ethics 28 (3):449-470.
    Scholars of early Chinese philosophy frequently point to the nontranscendent, organismic conception of the cosmos in early China as the source of China's unique perspective and distinctive values. One would expect recent works in Confucian ethics to capitalize on this idea. Reviewing recent works in Confucian ethics by P. J. Ivanhoe, David Nivison, R. P. Peerenboom, Henry Rosemont, and Tu Wei-Ming, the author analyzes these new studies in terms of the extent to which their representation of Confucian ethics reflects and (...)
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  4.  16
    The Ways of Confucianism: Investigations in Chinese Philosophy.Daniel Tauss, David S. Nivison & Bryan W. Van Norden - 1999 - Philosophy East and West 49 (1):92.
  5. Moral Decision in Wang Yang-Ming: The Problem of Chinese "Existentialism".David S. Nivison - 1973 - Philosophy East and West 23 (1/2):121-137.
  6.  3
    Chinese Language, Thought, and Culture: Nivison and His Critics.David S. Nivison - 1996 - Open Court Publishing.
    This collection of essays by leading sinologists, historians, and philosophers both challenges and extends the work of David Nivison, whose contributions range across moral philosophy, religious thought, intellectual history, and Chinese language. Nivison himself replies to each essay.
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  7. Communist Ethics and Chinese Tradition.David S. Nivison - 1954 - Cambridge: Center for International Studies, Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
     
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  8.  21
    Two Roots or One?David S. Nivison - 1980 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 53 (6):739 - 761.
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  9.  29
    Instructions for Practical Living and Other Neo-Confucian WritingsThe Philosophy of Wang Yang-Ming.David S. Nivison, Wang Yang-Ming, Wing-Tsit Chan & Frederick Goodrich Henke - 1964 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 84 (4):436.
  10.  9
    On Translating Mencius. [REVIEW]David S. Nivison - 1980 - Philosophy East and West 30 (1):93 - 122.
  11.  5
    Instructions for Practical Living: Surrejoinder.David S. Nivison - 1965 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 85 (3):409.
  12.  7
    The Life and Thought of Chang Hsüeh-Ch'eng (1738-1801)The Life and Thought of Chang Hsueh-Ch'eng.P. Demiéville, David S. Nivison & P. Demieville - 1967 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 87 (4):594.
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  13.  13
    Response to James Behuniak.David S. Nivison - 2000 - Philosophy East and West 50 (1):110-115.
  14. Standard Time.David S. Nivison - 2005 - Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 86 (1):219-232.
     
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