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  1.  39
    Beyond Reflection in Naturalized Phenomenology.Glenn Braddock - 2001 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 8 (11):3-16.
    In this paper, I defend a pluralistic view of phenomenological method which will provide evidence for particular accounts of experience without relying exclusively on the reflective method or on intuition as a criterion for truth. To this end, I discuss the prospects for indirect phenomenology. I argue that phenomenology ought to be defined by its object of investigation, first-person experience, and not by any particular method of gaining access to this object of investigation. On this view, an integration of naturalized (...)
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  2.  36
    The Examined Life?Glenn Braddock - 2009 - Think 8 (22):41-46.
    An introductory course in philosophy begins with Plato's Apology . Here Socrates famously states that ‘the unexamined life is not worth living for man’. The professor lingers on the idea. In this first week of the course they have already struck upon a justification for all of the torturous analyzing, arguing, and thought-experimenting that will follow in the next few months. Without these vehicles of ‘examination’, our lives are not worth living! The students may have experienced enthusiastic defenses of the (...)
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  3.  49
    Epicureanism, Death, and the Good Life.Glenn Braddock - 2000 - Philosophical Inquiry 22 (1-2):47-66.
  4.  90
    Eliminativism and Indeterminate Consciousness.Glenn Braddock - 2002 - Philosophical Psychology 15 (1):37-54.
    One of Daniel Dennett's most sophisticated arguments for his eliminativism about phenomenological properties centers around the color phi phenomenon. He attempts to show that there is no phenomenological fact of the matter concerning the phenomenon of apparent motion because it is impossible to decide between two competing explanations. I argue that the two explanations considered by Dennett are both based on the assumption that a realist account of the phenomenon must include a neat mapping between phenomenological time and objective time. (...)
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  5.  65
    The First-Person Approach and the Nature of Consciousness. Charles Siewert, the Significance of Consciousness.Glenn Braddock - 2003 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 2 (2):149-158.
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  6.  12
    Sartre on Atheism, Freedom, and Morality in The Humanism of Existentialism.Glenn Braddock - 2006 - In Christine Daigle (ed.), Existentialist Thinkers and Ethics. Mcgill/Queen's University Press. pp. 91.
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  7. Against Chalmers' Epiphenomenalism.Glenn Braddock - 2000 - Auslegung 24 (1):45-63.
     
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  8. Explaining Consciousness: Naturalizing the Phenomenological.Glenn Braddock - 2001 - Dissertation, State University of New York at Albany
    In this dissertation I defend the view that phenomenology has an important role to play in the naturalistic sciences of the mind. Phenomenological properties are real, causally efficacious features of the mind, but these properties are not always immediately discernible by common sense. Thus we require phenomenology to reveal these properties, the knowledge of which will contribute to our understanding of our mental lives. ;Contemporary, naturalistic theorists tend to either hope for a reductive or an eliminative account of consciousness or, (...)
     
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