Search results for '*History of Psychology' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Jari Kaukua & Vili Lähteenmäki (2010). Subjectivity as a Non-Textual Standard of Interpretation in the History of Philosophical Psychology. History & Theory 48 (1):21-37.score: 394.0
    Contemporary caution against anachronism in intellectual history, and the currently momentous theoretical emphasis on subjectivity in the philosophy of mind, are two prevailing conditions that set puzzling constraints for studies in the history of philosophical psychology. The former urges against assuming ideas, motives, and concepts that are alien to the historical intellectual setting under study, and combined with the latter suggests caution in relying on our intuitions regarding subjectivity due to the historically contingent characterizations it has attained in contemporary (...)
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  2. Jacob A. Belzen (2013). Ein Ende, Das Zum Anfang Wurde: Die Zeitschrift für Religionspsychologie, 1907-1913. Zur (Vor)Geschichte der IAPRThe End That Turned Into a New Beginning: The Journal for the Psychology of Religion, 1907-1913. On the (Pre)History of the International Association for the Psychology of Religion. [REVIEW] Archive for the Psychology of Religion 35 (3):285-319.score: 354.0
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  3. Harry Albert Van Belle (2014). Explorations in the History of Psychology: Persisting Themata and Changing Paradigms. Dordt College Press.score: 332.0
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  4. María G. Navarro (2013). Review of A History of Intelligence and 'Intellectual Disability': The Shaping of Psychology in Early Modern Europe by C. F. Goodey. [REVIEW] Seventeenth-Century News 71 (1 & 2).score: 329.3
    A History of Intelligence and “Intellectual Disability” examines how the concepts of intellectual ability and disability became part of psychology, medicine and biology. Focusing on the period between the Protestant Reform and 1700, this book shows that in many cases it has been accepted without scientific and psychological foundations that intelligence and disability describe natural or trans-historical realities.
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  5. George Sidney Brett (1912/1998). A History of Psychology. Thoemmes Press.score: 329.3
    'the whole work is remarkably fresh, vivid and attractively written psychologists will be grateful that a work of this kind has been done ... by one who has the scholarship, science, and philosophical training that are requisite for the task' - Mind This renowned three-volume collection records chronologically the steps by which psychology developed from the time of the early Greek thinkers and the first writings on the nature of the mind, through to the 1920s and such modern preoccupations (...)
     
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  6. Miki Takasuna (2012). The Fukurai Affair Parapsychology and the History of Psychology in Japan. History of the Human Sciences 25 (2):149-164.score: 307.3
    The history of psychology in Japan from the late 19th century until the first half of the 20th century did not follow a smooth course. After the first psychological laboratory was established at Tokyo Imperial University in 1903, psychology in Japan developed as individual specialties until the Japanese Psychological Association was established in 1927. During that time, Tomokichi Fukurai, an associate professor at Tokyo Imperial University, became involved with psychical research until he was forced out in 1913. The (...)
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  7. Wolfgang Huemer & Christoph Landerer (2010). Mathematics, Experience, and Laboratories: Herbart's and Brentano's Role in the Rise of Scientific Psychology. History of the Human Sciences 23 (3):72-94.score: 298.0
    In this article we present and compare two early attempts to establish psychology as an independent scientific discipline that had considerable influence in central Europe: the theories of Johann Friedrich Herbart (1776—1841) and Franz Brentano (1838—1917). While both of them emphasize that psychology ought to be conceived as an empirical science, their conceptions show revealing differences. Herbart starts with metaphysical principles and aims at mathematizing psychology, whereas Brentano rejects all metaphysics and bases his method on a conception (...)
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  8. Uljana Feest (forthcoming). The Continuing Relevance of 19th-Century Philosophy of Psychology: Brentano and the Autonomy of Psychological Methods. In C. GalavottiM (ed.), New Directions in the Philosophy of Science, The Philosophy of Science in a European Perspective 5. Springer.score: 296.0
    This paper provides an analysis of Franz Brentano’s thesis that psychology employs a distinctive method, which sets it apart from physiology. The aim of the paper is two-fold: First, I situate Brentano’s thesis (and the broader metaphysical system that underwrites it) within the context of specific debates about the nature and status of psychology, arguing that we regard him as engaging in a form of boundary work. Second, I explore the relevance of Brentano’s considerations to more recent debates (...)
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  9. J. Bos (2009). The Rise and Decline of Character: Humoral Psychology in Ancient and Early Modern Medical Theory. History of the Human Sciences 22 (3):29-50.score: 291.3
    Humoralism, the view that the human body is composed of a limited number of elementary fluids, is one of the most characteristic aspects of ancient medicine. The psychological dimension of humoral theory in the ancient world has thus far received a relatively small amount of scholarly attention. Medical psychology in the ancient world can only be correctly understood by relating it to psychological thought in other fields, such as ethics and rhetoric. The concept that ties these various domains together (...)
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  10. Gary Hatfield (2002). Psychology, Philosophy, and Cognitive Science: Reflections on the History and Philosophy of Experimental Psychology. Mind and Language 17 (3):207-232.score: 283.3
    This article critically examines the views that psychology ?rst came into existence as a discipline ca. 1879, that philosophy and psychology were estranged in the ensuing decades, that psychology ?nally became scienti?c through the in?uence of logical empiricism, and that it should now disappear in favor of cognitive science and neuroscience. It argues that psychology had a natural philosophical phase (from antiquity) that waxed in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, that this psychology transformed into experimental (...)
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  11. Amedeo Giorgi (2013). Reflections on the Status and Direction of Psychology: An External Historical Perspective. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 44 (2):244-261.score: 282.7
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  12. Richard F. Kitchener (1985). Genetic Epistemology, History of Science and Genetic Psychology. Synthese 65 (1):3 - 31.score: 264.0
    Genetic epistemology analyzes the growth of knowledge both in the individual person (genetic psychology) and in the socio-historical realm (the history of science). But what the relationship is between the history of science and genetic psychology remains unclear. The biogenetic law that ontogeny recapitulates phylogeny is inadequate as a characterization of the relation. A critical examination of Piaget's Introduction à l'Épistémologie Généntique indicates these are several examples of what I call stage laws common to both areas. Furthermore, there (...)
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  13. Pierre-Yves Brandt (2013). Berguer, Rochedieu: Flournoy's Legacy in the Genevan School of the Psychology of Religion. Archive for the Psychology of Religion 35 (1):31-46.score: 260.0
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  14. George Sidney Brett (1965). Brett's History of Psychology. Cambridge, Mass.,M.I.T. Press.score: 260.0
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  15. George Sidney Brett (1953). History of Psychology. New York, Macmillan.score: 260.0
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  16. Mary Henle (1986). 1879 and All That: Essays in the Theory and History of Psychology. Columbia University Press.score: 260.0
  17. William James (2005). The Notion of Consciousness: Communication Made (in French) at the 5th International Congress of Psychology, Rome, 30 April 1905. [REVIEW] Journal of Consciousness Studies 12 (7):55-64.score: 258.7
  18. Helmut K. Reich & Peter C. Hill (2008). Quo Vadis Psychology of Religion? Introduction to the Special Section. Archive for the Psychology of Religion / Archiv für Religionspychologie 30 (1):5-18.score: 252.0
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  19. Amedeo Giorgi (2010). Phenomenological Psychology: A Brief History and Its Challenges. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 41 (2):145-179.score: 248.7
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  20. Victor Nell (2006). Cruelty and the Psychology of History. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (3):246-251.score: 248.0
    This response deals with seven of the major challenges the commentators have raised to the target article. First, I show that the historical-anecdotal method I have followed has its roots in sociology, and that there is a strong case for the development of a “psychology of history.” Next, the observational data suggesting that intentional cruelty cannot be restricted to humans is rebutted on the grounds that cruelty requires not only an intention to inflict pain, but to do so because (...)
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  21. Christopher D. Green, Classics in the History of Psychology.score: 240.0
    Psychology as the behaviorist views it is a purely objective experimental branch of natural science. Its theoretical goal is the prediction and control of behavior. Introspection forms no essential part of its methods, nor is the scientific value of its data dependent upon the readiness with which they lend themselves to interpretation in terms of consciousness. The behaviorist, in his efforts to get a unitary scheme of animal response, recognizes no dividing line between man and brute. The behavior of (...)
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  22. Teed Rockwell, The Effects of Atomistic Ontology on the History of Psychology.score: 240.0
    _This article articulates the presuppositions that psychology inherited from logical positivism, and how_ _those presuppositions effected the interpretation of data and research procedures. Despite the efforts of_ _Wundt, his most well known disciples, Titchener and Külpe, embraced an atomistic view of experience which_ _was at_ _least partly responsible for many of their failures. When the behaviorists rejected the_ _introspectionism of Titchener and Külpe, they kept their atomism, using the reflex_.
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  23. Duangduen Bhanthumnavin (1987). Social History of Psychology in Thailand. In G. H. Blowers & Alison M. Turtle (eds.), Psychology Moving East: The Status of Western Psychology in Asia and Oceania. Sydney University Press. 71--88.score: 240.0
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  24. J. S. Z. Hsu (1987). The History of Psychology in Taiwan. In G. H. Blowers & Alison M. Turtle (eds.), Psychology Moving East: The Status of Western Psychology in Asia and Oceania. Sydney University Press. 127--138.score: 240.0
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  25. C. F. Goodey (2001). From Natural Disability to the Moral Man: Calvinism and the History of Psychology. History of the Human Sciences 14 (3):1-29.score: 236.0
    Some humanist theologians within the French Reformed Church in the 17th century developed the notion that a disability of the intellect could exist in nature independently of any moral defect, freeing its possessors from any obligations of natural law. Sharpened by disputes with the church leadership, this notion began to suggest a species-type classification that threatened to override the importance of the boundary between elect and reprobate in the doctrine of predestination. This classification seems to look forward to the natural (...)
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  26. Russell L. Friedman (2012). Intellectual Traditions at the Medieval University: The Use of Philosophical Psychology in Trinitarian Theology Among the Franciscans and Dominicans, 1250-1350. Brill.score: 236.0
    This book presents an overview of the later medieval trinitarian theology of the rival Franciscan and Dominican intellectual traditions, and includes detailed studies of thinkers such as Thomas Aquinas, Henry of Ghent, John Duns Scotus, ...
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  27. Uljana Feest (2012). Husserl's Crisis as a Crisis of Psychology. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 43 (2):493-503.score: 235.3
    This paper places Husserl’s mature work, The Crisis of the European Sciences, in the context of his engagement with – and critique of – experimental psychology at the time. I begin by showing (a) that Husserl accorded psychology a crucial role in his philosophy, i.e., that of providing a scientific analysis of subjectivity, and (b) that he viewed contemporary psychology – due to its naturalism – as having failed to pursue this goal in the appropriate manner. I (...)
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  28. Janet Thormann (2002). The Representation of the Shoah in Maus: History as Psychology. Res Publica 8 (2):123-139.score: 235.3
    The contemporary tendency in United States culture to substitute a discourse of psychology for political and social analysis is especially evident in treatments of the Shoah. Drawing on postmodernist techniques, Art Spiegelman's“Holocaust commix”, Maus, dramatizes not historical reality but the effort of representing the memory of trauma. In the absence of symbolic authority, suffering from rivalry with his father and haunted by the real of the father's voice, the son becomes the subject of the narration. Like Maus, the Holocaust (...)
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  29. Alan Costall (2006). 'Introspectionism' and the Mythical Origins of Scientific Psychology. Consciousness and Cognition 15 (4):634-654.score: 234.7
  30. Yvonne Wübben (2013). Writing Cases and Casuistic Reasoning in Karl Philipp Moritz' Journal of Empirical Psychology. Early Science and Medicine 18 (4-5):471-486.score: 234.7
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  31. K. Helmut Reich (1998). Psychology of Religion: What One Needs to Know. Zygon 33 (1):113-120.score: 234.7
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  32. Thomas Teo (2005). The Critique of Psychology: From Kant to Postcolonial Theory. Springer.score: 233.3
    Closely paralleling the history of psychology is the history of its critics, their theories, and their contributions. The Critique of Psychology is the first book to trace this alternate history, from a unique perspective that complements the many existing empirical, theoretical, and social histories of the field. Thomas Teo cogently synthesizes major historical and theoretical narratives to describe two centuries of challenges to—and the reactions of—the mainstream. Some of these critiques of content, methodology, relevance, and philosophical worldview have (...)
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  33. Dirk Schlimm (2009). Learning From the Existence of Models: On Psychic Machines, Tortoises, and Computer Simulations. Synthese 169 (3):521 - 538.score: 232.0
    Using four examples of models and computer simulations from the history of psychology, I discuss some of the methodological aspects involved in their construction and use, and I illustrate how the existence of a model can demonstrate the viability of a hypothesis that had previously been deemed impossible on a priori grounds. This shows a new way in which scientists can learn from models that extends the analysis of Morgan (1999), who has identified the construction and manipulation of models (...)
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  34. Dedre Gentner (2010). Psychology in Cognitive Science: 1978–2038. Topics in Cognitive Science 2 (3):328-344.score: 230.0
    This paper considers the past and future of Psychology within Cognitive Science. In the history section, I focus on three questions: (a) how has the position of Psychology evolved within Cognitive Science, relative to the other disciplines that make up Cognitive Science; (b) how have particular Cognitive Science areas within Psychology waxed or waned; and (c) what have we gained and lost. After discussing what’s happened since the late 1970s, when the Society and the journal began, I (...)
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  35. William F. Brewer & Clark A. Chinn (1994). Scientists' Responses to Anomalous Data: Evidence From Psychology, History, and Philosophy of Science. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1994:304 - 313.score: 230.0
    This paper presents an analysis of the forms of response that scientists make when confronted with anomalous data. We postulate that there are seven ways in which an individual who currently holds a theory can respond to anomalous data: (1) ignore the data; (2) reject the data; (3) exclude the data from the domain of the current theory; (4) hold the data in abeyance; (5) reinterpret the data; (6) make peripheral changes to the current theory; or (7) change the theory. (...)
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  36. George Boas (1920). A Note for the History of Affective Psychology. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 17 (6):157-159.score: 230.0
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  37. Roberto Cordeschi (2002). The Discovery of the Artificial: Behavior, Mind and Machines Before and Beyond Cybernetics. Kluwer.score: 228.7
    The book provides a valuable text for undergraduate and graduate courses on the historical and theoretical issues of Cognitive Science, Artificial Intelligence, Psychology, Neuroscience, and the Philosophy of Mind. The book should also be of interest for researchers in these fields, who will find in it analyses of certain crucial issues in both the earlier and more recent history of their disciplines, as well as interesting overall insights into the current debate on the nature of mind.
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  38. Arthur L. Blumenthal (2001). A Wundt Primer: The Operating Characteristics of Consciousness. In Robert W. Rieber & David K. Robinson (eds.), Wilhelm Wundt in History: The Making of a Scientific Psychology. Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers. 121-144.score: 224.7
  39. Ron Amundson (1983). E. C. Tolman and the Intervening Variable: A Study in the Epistemological History of Psychology. Philosophy of Science 50 (2):268-282.score: 224.0
    E. C. Tolman's 'purposive behaviorism' is commonly interpreted as an attempt to operationalize a cognitivist theory of learning by the use of the 'Intervening Variable' (IV). Tolman would thus be a counterinstance to an otherwise reliable correlation of cognitivism with realism, and S-R behaviorism with operationalism. A study of Tolman's epistemological background, with a careful reading of his methodological writings, shows the common interpretation to be false. Tolman was a cognitivist and a realist. His 'IV' has been systematically misinterpreted by (...)
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  40. A. A. Goldenweiser (1918). History, Psychology and Culture: A Set of Categories for an Introduction to Social Science. Part I. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 15 (21):561-571.score: 218.0
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  41. A. A. Goldenweiser (1918). History, Psychology and Culture: A Set of Categories for an Introduction to Social Science. Part II. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 15 (22):589-607.score: 218.0
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  42. Rod Buchanan (2008). Book Review: Adrian C. Brock, Ed., Internationalizing the History of Psychology. New York: New York University Press, 2006. 0-8147-9944-2. $50.00 (Cloth), Viii + 260 Pp. [REVIEW] History of the Human Sciences 21 (2):120-123.score: 208.0
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  43. Marion Thomas (2005). Are Animals Just Noisy Machines?: Louis Boutan and the Co-Invention of Animal and Child Psychology in the French Third Republic. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 38 (3):425 - 460.score: 208.0
    Historians of science have only just begun to sample the wealth of different approaches to the study of animal behavior undertaken in the twentieth century. To date, more attention has been given to Lorenzian ethology and American behaviorism than to other work and traditions, but different approaches are equally worthy of the historian's attention, reflecting not only the broader range of questions that could be asked about animal behavior and the "animal mind" but also the different contexts in which these (...)
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  44. Roger Smith (1988). Does the History of Psychology Have a Subject? History of the Human Sciences 1 (2):147-177.score: 208.0
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  45. A. J. Soyland (1991). Reviews : David E. Leary (Ed.), Metaphors in the History of Psychology, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1990, £32.50, Xiii + 383 Pp. [REVIEW] History of the Human Sciences 4 (3):452-454.score: 208.0
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  46. J. Brozek (1972). Soviet Writings of the 1960's on the History of Psychology and the Physiology of Behavior. History of Science 10:56-87.score: 208.0
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  47. Edward S. Reed (1989). Theory, Concept, and Experiment in the History of Psychology: The Older Tradition Behind a 'Young Science'. History of the Human Sciences 2 (3):333-356.score: 208.0
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  48. Uljana Feest (2007). 'Hypotheses, Everywhere Only Hypotheses!': On Some Contexts of Dilthey's Critique of Explanatory Psychology. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 38 (1):43-62.score: 206.0
    In 1894, Wilhelm Dilthey published an article in which he formulated a critique of what he called ‘explanatory psychology’, contrasting it with his own conception of ‘descriptive psychology’. Dilthey’s descriptive psychology, in turn, was to provide the basis for Dilthey’s specific philosophy of the human sciences (Geisteswissenschaften). In this paper, I contextualize Dilthey’s critique of explanatory psychology. I show that while this critique comes across as very broad and sweeping, he in fact had specific opponents in (...)
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  49. Carolina Armenteros (2012). 'True Love' and Rousseau's Philosophy of History. Journal of the Philosophy of History 6 (2):258-282.score: 204.0
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