Search results for '*History of Psychology' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  42
    Jari Kaukua & Vili Lähteenmäki (2010). Subjectivity as a Non-Textual Standard of Interpretation in the History of Philosophical Psychology. History & Theory 48 (1):21-37.
    Contemporary caution against anachronism in intellectual history, and the currently momentous theoretical emphasis on subjectivity in the philosophy of mind, are two prevailing conditions that set puzzling constraints for studies in the history of philosophical psychology. The former urges against assuming ideas, motives, and concepts that are alien to the historical intellectual setting under study, and combined with the latter suggests caution in relying on our intuitions regarding subjectivity due to the historically contingent characterizations it has attained in contemporary (...)
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  2.  6
    Jacob A. Belzen (2013). Ein Ende, Das Zum Anfang Wurde: Die Zeitschrift Für Religionspsychologie, 1907-1913. Zur (Vor)Geschichte der IAPRThe End That Turned Into a New Beginning: The Journal for the Psychology of Religion, 1907-1913. On the (Pre)History of the International Association for the Psychology of Religion. [REVIEW] Archive for the Psychology of Religion 35 (3):285-319.
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  3.  4
    George Sidney Brett (1912). A History of Psychology. Thoemmes Press.
    'the whole work is remarkably fresh, vivid and attractively written psychologists will be grateful that a work of this kind has been done ... by one who has the scholarship, science, and philosophical training that are requisite for the task' - Mind This renowned three-volume collection records chronologically the steps by which psychology developed from the time of the early Greek thinkers and the first writings on the nature of the mind, through to the 1920s and such modern preoccupations (...)
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  4. Harry Albert Van Belle (2014). Explorations in the History of Psychology: Persisting Themata and Changing Paradigms. Dordt College Press.
     
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  5.  50
    María G. Navarro (2013). Review of A History of Intelligence and 'Intellectual Disability': The Shaping of Psychology in Early Modern Europe by C. F. Goodey. [REVIEW] Seventeenth-Century News 71 (1 & 2).
    A History of Intelligence and “Intellectual Disability” examines how the concepts of intellectual ability and disability became part of psychology, medicine and biology. Focusing on the period between the Protestant Reform and 1700, this book shows that in many cases it has been accepted without scientific and psychological foundations that intelligence and disability describe natural or trans-historical realities.
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  6.  6
    Miki Takasuna (2012). The Fukurai Affair Parapsychology and the History of Psychology in Japan. History of the Human Sciences 25 (2):149-164.
    The history of psychology in Japan from the late 19th century until the first half of the 20th century did not follow a smooth course. After the first psychological laboratory was established at Tokyo Imperial University in 1903, psychology in Japan developed as individual specialties until the Japanese Psychological Association was established in 1927. During that time, Tomokichi Fukurai, an associate professor at Tokyo Imperial University, became involved with psychical research until he was forced out in 1913. The (...)
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  7.  8
    Wilse Webb (1989). History of Psychology. Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 9 (1):44-45.
    If we accept philosophy as the search for knowledge about ourselves and the world around us by reasoning and we accept psychology as the use of science in the search for understanding the mind and behavior, we can get along without philosophy in our history courses very well. We can begin the history of psychology with the emergence of the life sciences in the early 1800s with passing kudos to the general emergence of science via Gallileo, Newton and (...)
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  8. Cherie G. O'Boyle (2006). History of Psychology: A Cultural Perspective. Psychology Press.
    _History of Psychology: A Cultural Perspective_ easily distinguishes itself from other texts in a number of ways. First, it examines the field within the rich intellectual and cultural context of everyday life, cross-cultural influences, and contributions from literature, art, and other disciplines. Second, it is a history of ideas, concepts, and questions, instead of dates, events, or great minds. Third, the book explores the history of applied, developmental, clinical, and cognitive psychology as well as experimental psychology. Conveyed (...)
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  9. Margaret P. Munger (ed.) (2003). The History of Psychology: Fundamental Questions. Oxford University Press Usa.
    The History of Psychology: Fundamental Questions provides significant excerpts from the philosophers, theologians, and scientists who contributed to the development of psychology. It also includes more recent works covering issues and ideas in cognitive psychology and neuroscience. Extensively classroom-tested, this anthology addresses a comprehensive range of topics, yet is suitable for use as a core text or as a supplement in a single-semester course on the history of psychology. The History of Psychology offers selections from: (...)
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  10. Gary Hatfield (2002). Psychology, Philosophy, and Cognitive Science: Reflections on the History and Philosophy of Experimental Psychology. Mind and Language 17 (3):207-232.
    This article critically examines the views that psychology ?rst came into existence as a discipline ca. 1879, that philosophy and psychology were estranged in the ensuing decades, that psychology ?nally became scienti?c through the in?uence of logical empiricism, and that it should now disappear in favor of cognitive science and neuroscience. It argues that psychology had a natural philosophical phase (from antiquity) that waxed in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, that this psychology transformed into experimental (...)
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  11.  18
    Jari Kaukua & Vili Lähteenmäki (2008). Subjectivity as a Non-Textual Standard of Interpretation in the History of Philosophical Psychology. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 38:41-47.
    Contemporary caution of anachronism in intellectual history on the one hand, and currently momentous theoretical emphasis on subjectivity on the other, are two prevailing circumstances that set puzzling constraints for studies in the history of philosophical psychology. Together these circumstances call for heightened awareness of our own interpretive presuppositions as historians: the former urges against assuming ideas, motives, and concepts that may be alien in the historical intellectual setting under study and the latter suggests caution in relying on our (...)
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  12.  5
    C. F. Goodey (2001). From Natural Disability to the Moral Man: Calvinism and the History of Psychology. History of the Human Sciences 14 (3):1-29.
    Some humanist theologians within the French Reformed Church in the 17th century developed the notion that a disability of the intellect could exist in nature independently of any moral defect, freeing its possessors from any obligations of natural law. Sharpened by disputes with the church leadership, this notion began to suggest a species-type classification that threatened to override the importance of the boundary between elect and reprobate in the doctrine of predestination. This classification seems to look forward to the natural (...)
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  13. Harald Walach (2005). Higher Self–Spark of the Mind–Summit of the Soul. Early History of an Important Concept of Transpersonal Psychology in the West. International Journal of Transpersonal Studies 24:16-28.
    The Higher Self is a concept introduced by Roberto Assagioli, the founder of psychosynthesis, into transpersonal psychology. This notion is explained and linked up with the Western mystical tradition. Here, coming from antiquity and specifically from the neo-Platonic tradition, a similiar concept has been developed which became known as the spark of the soul, or summit of the mind. This history is sketched and the meaning of the term illustrated. During the middle ages it was developed into a (...) of mysticism by Thomas Gallus, popularized by Bonaventure, and radicalized by the Carthusian writer Hugh of Balma. Spark of the soul signifies an "organ of the mystical experience." It is argued that the split introduced into history between outer and inner experience has lain dormant ever since the 13th century, with inner experience relegated to the private and mystical realm. By introducing this concept, transpersonal psychology reconnects with this tradition and has to be aware of the legacy: to achieve the theoretical, and if possible scientific, integration of both types of experience by drawing on the experiential nature of this concept and fostering good research. (shrink)
     
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  14. Mark E. Ware & David E. Johnson (eds.) (2000). Handbook of Demonstrations and Activities in the Teaching of Psychology, Second Edition: Volume I: Introductory, Statistics, Research Methods, and History. Psychology Press.
    For those who teach students in psychology, education, and the social sciences, the _Handbook of Demonstrations and Activities in the Teaching of Psychology, Second Edition_ provides practical applications and rich sources of ideas. Revised to include a wealth of new material, these invaluable reference books contain the collective experience of teachers who have successfully dealt with students' difficulty in mastering important concepts about human behavior. Each volume features a table that lists the articles and identifies the primary and (...)
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  15.  32
    Richard F. Kitchener (1985). Genetic Epistemology, History of Science and Genetic Psychology. Synthese 65 (1):3 - 31.
    Genetic epistemology analyzes the growth of knowledge both in the individual person (genetic psychology) and in the socio-historical realm (the history of science). But what the relationship is between the history of science and genetic psychology remains unclear. The biogenetic law that ontogeny recapitulates phylogeny is inadequate as a characterization of the relation. A critical examination of Piaget's Introduction à l'Épistémologie Généntique indicates these are several examples of what I call stage laws common to both areas. Furthermore, there (...)
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  16. George Sidney Brett (1965). Brett's History of Psychology. Cambridge, Mass.,M.I.T. Press.
     
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  17. George Sidney Brett (1953). History of Psychology. New York, Macmillan.
     
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  18. William F. Brewer (ed.) (2012). The Theory Ladenness of the Mental Processes Used in the Scientific Enterprise: Evidence From Cognitive Psychology and the History of Science. In R. W. Proctor & E. J. Capaldi (Eds.). Psychology of Science: Implicit and Explicit Processes (289-334). New York: Oxford University Press. Oxford.
    This chapter takes a naturalized approach to the philosophy of science using evidence from cognitive psychology and from the history of science. It first describes the problem of the theory ladenness of perception. Then it provides a general top-down/bottom-up framework from cognitive psychology that is used to organize and evaluate the evidence for theory ladenness throughout the process of carrying out science (perception, attention, thinking, experimenting, memory, and communication). The chapter highlights both the facilitatory and inhibitory role of (...)
     
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  19. Mary Henle (1986). 1879 and All That: Essays in the Theory and History of Psychology. Columbia University Press.
     
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  20. Elizabeth R. Valentine (2014). Philosophy and History of Psychology: Selected Works of Elizabeth Valentine. Psychology Press, Taylor & Francis Group.
     
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  21.  12
    Amedeo Giorgi (2013). Reflections on the Status and Direction of Psychology: An External Historical Perspective. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 44 (2):244-261.
    Whenever one reads internal histories of psychology what is covered is the establishment of a lab by Wundt in 1879 as the initiating act and then the breakaway movements of the 20th Century are discussed: Behaviorism, Gestalt Theory, Psychoanalysis, and most recently the Cognitive revival. However, Aron Gurwitsch described a perspective noted by Cassirer and first developed by Malebranche, which dates the founding of psychology at the same time as that of physics in the 17th Century. This external (...)
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  22. Alexander Bain (1873). Mental Science a Compendium of Psychology, and the History of Philosophy, Designed as a Textbook for High-Schools and Colleges. D. Appleton and Co.
     
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  23. Edward S. Reed (1989). Theory, Concept, and Experiment in the History of Psychology: The Older Tradition Behind a 'Young Science'. History of the Human Sciences 2 (3):333-356.
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  24.  97
    A. J. Soyland (1991). Reviews : David E. Leary (Ed.), Metaphors in the History of Psychology, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1990, £32.50, Xiii + 383 Pp. [REVIEW] History of the Human Sciences 4 (3):452-454.
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  25. Rod Buchanan (2008). Book Review: Adrian C. Brock, Ed., Internationalizing the History of Psychology. New York: New York University Press, 2006. 0-8147-9944-2. $50.00 (Cloth), Viii + 260 Pp. [REVIEW] History of the Human Sciences 21 (2):120-123.
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  26.  79
    Roger Smith (1988). Does the History of Psychology Have a Subject? History of the Human Sciences 1 (2):147-177.
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  27.  1
    Walter Libby (1921). A History Of Psychology By George Sidney Brett. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 4:376-378.
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  28.  1
    Martin Kusch (1997). Metaphors in the History of Psychology. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Science 30 (1):101-121.
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  29. J. Brozek (1972). Soviet Writings of the 1960's on the History of Psychology and the Physiology of Behavior. History of Science 10:56-87.
  30. Martin Kusch (1997). David E. Leary , Metaphors in the History of Psychology. Cambridge Studies in the History of Psychology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1994. Pp. Xiv+383. ISBN 0-521-42152-7. £12.95, $17.95. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Science 30 (1):101-121.
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  31. Martin Kusch (1995). Kurt Danziger. Constructing the Subject: Historical Origins of Psychological Research. Cambridge Studies in the History of Psychology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1994. Pp. Ix + 254. ISBN 0-521-46785-3. £12.95, $16.95. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Science 28 (2):243.
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  32. Martin Kusch (1996). Mitchell G. Ash, Gestalt Psychology in German Culture, 1890–1967: Holism and the Quest for Objectivity. Cambridge Studies in the History of Psychology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1995. Pp. Xii + 513. ISBN 0-521-47540-6. £35.00, $54.90. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Science 29 (4):483.
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  33. C. Pleh (2014). Book Review: A Guided Science: History of Psychology in the Middle of its Making. [REVIEW] History of the Human Sciences 27 (2):133-135.
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  34. Robert Richards (1982). A History Of Psychology: Main Currents In Psychological Thought By Thomas H. Leahey. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 73:125-127.
     
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  35. Robert Richards (1980). An Intellectual History of Psychology by Daniel N. Robinson; The Mind Unfolded: Essays on Psychology's Historic Texts by Daniel N. Robinson. Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 71:325-326.
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  36. R. Smith (1994). Essay Review: History of Psychology in Synthesis, Mental Machinery: The Origins and Consequences of Psychological Ideas. History of Science 32 (1):103-106.
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  37. Alison M. Turtle (1993). Jaap Van Ginneken, Crowds, Psychology, and Politics, 1871–1899. Cambridge Studies in the History of Psychology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1992. Pp. Xii + 269. ISBN 0-521-40418-5. £35.00, $59.95. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Science 26 (3):372.
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  38.  1
    Rahul Chaudhri (2016). The Troubled Union of History and Psychology in Nietzsche's Genealogy. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 47 (2):202-211.
    The project of inquiring into the history of our morals is premised upon the idea that some of our deeply held moral convictions might have emerged through a complicated historical process, rather than, say, through a process of rational deliberation. Were that the case, our philosophical efforts to properly understand our present moral conceptions, as well as our efforts to criticize them, would certainly profit from serious attention to the history of our morals. Jesse Prinz notes, however, that there are (...)
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  39.  15
    Christopher D. Green, Classics in the History of Psychology.
    Psychology as the behaviorist views it is a purely objective experimental branch of natural science. Its theoretical goal is the prediction and control of behavior. Introspection forms no essential part of its methods, nor is the scientific value of its data dependent upon the readiness with which they lend themselves to interpretation in terms of consciousness. The behaviorist, in his efforts to get a unitary scheme of animal response, recognizes no dividing line between man and brute. The behavior of (...)
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  40.  13
    Victor Nell (2006). Cruelty and the Psychology of History. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (3):246-251.
    This response deals with seven of the major challenges the commentators have raised to the target article. First, I show that the historical-anecdotal method I have followed has its roots in sociology, and that there is a strong case for the development of a “psychology of history.” Next, the observational data suggesting that intentional cruelty cannot be restricted to humans is rebutted on the grounds that cruelty requires not only an intention to inflict pain, but to do so because (...)
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  41. Teed Rockwell, The Effects of Atomistic Ontology on the History of Psychology.
    _This article articulates the presuppositions that psychology inherited from logical positivism, and how_ _those presuppositions effected the interpretation of data and research procedures. Despite the efforts of_ _Wundt, his most well known disciples, Titchener and Külpe, embraced an atomistic view of experience which_ _was at_ _least partly responsible for many of their failures. When the behaviorists rejected the_ _introspectionism of Titchener and Külpe, they kept their atomism, using the reflex_.
     
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  42. Duangduen Bhanthumnavin (1987). Social History of Psychology in Thailand. In G. H. Blowers & Alison M. Turtle (eds.), Psychology Moving East: The Status of Western Psychology in Asia and Oceania. Sydney University Press 71--88.
     
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  43. William Cobb & James M. Edie (eds.) (1964). The Primacy of Perception: And Other Essays on Phenomenological Psychology, the Philosophy of Art, History and Politics. Northwestern University Press.
    _The Primacy of Perception_ brings together a number of important studies by Maurice Merleau-Ponty that appeared in various publications from 1947 to 1961. The title essay, which is in essence a presentation of the underlying thesis of his _Phenomenology of Perception,_ is followed by two courses given by Merleau-Ponty at the Sorbonne on phenomenological psychology. "Eye and Mind" and the concluding chapters present applications of Merleau-Ponty's ideas to the realms of art, philosophy of history, and politics. Taken together, the (...)
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  44. Edwin E. Gantt (2016). Review of A History of Psychology in Western Civilization. [REVIEW] Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 36 (1):57-58.
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  45. J. S. Z. Hsu (1987). The History of Psychology in Taiwan. In G. H. Blowers & Alison M. Turtle (eds.), Psychology Moving East: The Status of Western Psychology in Asia and Oceania. Sydney University Press 127--138.
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  46. Mike Michael (1997). The Hiss of History and the Sigh of Psychology. History of the Human Sciences 10 (2):133-139.
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  47.  1
    Dreyer Kruger (2001). A Short History of Phenomenological Psychology in South Africa. Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 1 (2):1-2.
    Dreyer Kruger, now in his eighties, was asked to reflect on the years of his active professional experience, especially while at Rhodes University from 1974 to 1989. Considered by many to be the doyen of phenomenological psychology in South Africa, he introduced what, at that time, was a revolutionary view in the social sciences of understanding what it means to be human.During his tenure as an academic psychologist, a cohort of doctoral level phenomenologically-oriented psychologists emerged, many of whom emigrated (...)
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  48. David E. Leary (ed.) (1994). Metaphors in the History of Psychology. Cambridge University Press.
     
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  49.  19
    K. A. Abul'khanova & A. N. Slavskaia (1997). On the History of the Alliance Between Psychology and Philosophy. Russian Studies in Philosophy 36 (1):84-94.
    Psychology was born and evolved over the course of centuries in the bosom of philosophy, from which it separated to become an experimental science. However, not many are familiar with the period in the middle of our century when psychology and philosophy were united, a period that to a large extent defined the philosophical-methodological distinctiveness of our psychological science in comparison with world psychology. Today this uniqueness is ascribed exclusively to the influence of Marxism and, because of (...)
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  50.  16
    Janet Thormann (2002). The Representation of the Shoah in Maus: History as Psychology. Res Publica 8 (2):123-139.
    The contemporary tendency in United States culture to substitute a discourse of psychology for political and social analysis is especially evident in treatments of the Shoah. Drawing on postmodernist techniques, Art Spiegelman's“Holocaust commix”, Maus, dramatizes not historical reality but the effort of representing the memory of trauma. In the absence of symbolic authority, suffering from rivalry with his father and haunted by the real of the father's voice, the son becomes the subject of the narration. Like Maus, the Holocaust (...)
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