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Profile: Zvi Biener (University of Cincinnati)
  1.  67
    Zvi Biener (2016). Hobbes on the Order of Sciences: A Partial Defense of the Mathematization Thesis. Southern Journal of Philosophy 54 (3):312-332.
    Accounts of Hobbes's “system” of sciences oscillate between two extremes. On one extreme, the system is portrayed as wholly axiomatic-deductive, with statecraft being deduced in an unbroken chain from the principles of logic and first philosophy. On the other, it is portrayed as rife with conceptual cracks and fissures, with Hobbes's statements about its deductive structure amounting to mere window-dressing. This paper argues that a middle way is found by conceiving of Hobbes's Elements of Philosophy on the model of a (...)
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  2.  8
    Zvi Biener & Chris Smeenk, Cotes’ Queries: Newton’s Empiricism and Conceptions of Matter.
    We argue that a conflict between two conceptions of “quantity of matter” employed in a corollary to proposition 6 of Book III of the Principia illustrates a deeper conflict between Newton’s view of the nature of extended bodies and the concept of mass appropriate for the theoretical framework of the Principia. We trace Newton’s failure to recognize the conflict to the fact that he allowed for the justification of natural philosophical claims by two types of a posteriori, empiricist methodologies. Newton's (...)
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  3. Zvi Biener & Eric Schliesser (eds.) (2014). Newton and Empiricism. Oxford UP.
    This is the first volume of original commissioned papers on the subject of Newton and empiricism. The chapters, contributed by a leading team of both established and younger international scholars, explore the nature and extent of Newton's relationship to a variety of empiricisms and empiricists.
     
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  4.  18
    Zvi Biener, De Gravitatione Reconsidered: The Changing Significance of Empirical Evidence for Newton's Metaphysics of Space.
    I argue that Isaac Newton's _De Gravitatione_ should not be considered an authoritative expression of his thought about the metaphysics of space and its relation to physical inquiry. I establish the following narrative: In _De Gravitatione_, Newton claimed he had direct experimental evidence for the work's central thesis: that space had ``its own manner of existing'' as an affection or emanative effect. In the 1710s, however, through the prodding of both Roger Cotes and G. W. Leibniz, he came to see (...)
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  5.  46
    Zvi Biener (2004). Galileo's First New Science: The Science of Matter. Perspectives on Science 12 (3):262-287.
    : Although Galileo's struggle to mathematize the study of nature is well known and oft discussed, less discussed is the form this struggle takes in relation to Galileo's first new science, the science of the second day of the Discorsi. This essay argues that Galileo's first science ought to be understood as the science of matter—not, as it is usually understood, the science of the strength of materials. This understanding sheds light on the convoluted structure of the Discorsi's first day. (...)
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  6.  2
    Zvi Biener & Chris Smeenk (2004). Pendulums, Pedagogy, and Matter: Lessons From the Editing of Newton's Principia. Science and Education 13 (4-5):309-320.
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  7.  6
    Zvi Biener (2003). Review of I. Bernard Cohen, George E. Smith, (Eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Newton. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2003 (1).