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  1.  4
    What We Do and Do Not Learn From Thomas Piketty.Nanette Funk - 2016 - Radical Philosophy Review 19 (2):297-311.
    Thomas Piketty’s Capital in the Twenty-First Century is not only a work of economic history and theory but also a political and normative argument and a critique of ideology. It is invaluable for its magisterial documentation of increasing inequality in capitalism, and unprecedented US economic inequality in particular. I situate it within philosophical conceptions of justice. I also identify it as a non-determinist critique of the political economy of capitalism and a substantive and methodological challenge to mainstream economics. I discuss (...)
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  2.  4
    Robyn Marasco on Dialectical Despair and the Sources of Critical Theory.W. Ezekiel Goggin - 2016 - Radical Philosophy Review 19 (2):513-516.
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  3.  1
    Beyond Pensiero Debole in Latin America.Alberto Hernandez-Lemus - 2016 - Radical Philosophy Review 19 (2):409-427.
    Taking the work of Gianni Vattimo and Santiago Zabala, Hermeneutic Communism, as a point of departure, this essay explores the concept of pensiero debole and its application to progressive contemporary Latin American governments, which the authors describe as “communist in spirit.” The essay embraces pensiero debole as a method to disagree with Vattimo and Zabala’s assessment and to contrast the policies of state capitalism carried out by those governments to the praxis of anti-systemic social movements engaged in a reformulation of (...)
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  4.  2
    Holding Hands with Death.Mladjo Ivanovic - 2016 - Radical Philosophy Review 19 (2):359-379.
    This paper explores the historical conditions under which the object of humanitarian discourse is conceived and organized. What is problematic about this discourse is not only the alarming reality of humanitarianism’s intertwinement with militarism and political power, but also the calculated arbitrariness of redress that brings into question which norms guide public articulations of victims’ suffering. By questioning how a specific understanding of the other is formed, this paper aims to draw attention to the inconsistencies associated with the problematic relation (...)
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  5. Cuban Philosophers and a Battle for Ideas.Anna Malavisi - 2016 - Radical Philosophy Review 19 (2):517-521.
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  6.  2
    Guest Editors' Introduction.Margaret A. McLaren & Joshua Mills-Knutsen - 2016 - Radical Philosophy Review 19 (2):289-296.
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  7.  2
    Philosophy Beyond the Carceral.Mechthild Nagel - 2016 - Radical Philosophy Review 19 (2):523-527.
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  8.  1
    Questioning the Late Foucault.Richard Peterson - 2016 - Radical Philosophy Review 19 (2):501-512.
  9.  2
    Ontological Borders.A. F. Pomeroy - 2016 - Radical Philosophy Review 19 (2):313-330.
    Judith Butler maintains that the universality of the precarity of life confirms the interdependence of lives. Such interdependence makes us fundamentally responsible for the lives of Others. Through the application of Marx’s critique of capitalism as ontological degradation, we ask whether the notions of a life and of lives as Butler outlines them in her recent works are adequate to ground moral understanding and practice, or whether, the manner in which human lives produce and reproduce themselves within the capitalist context (...)
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  10.  3
    Death Penalty.Anindya Sekhar Purakayastha - 2016 - Radical Philosophy Review 19 (2):529-533.
  11. Rethinking the Normative Basis of Environmental Thought.Michael Reno - 2016 - Radical Philosophy Review 19 (2):535-540.
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  12. If We Were Really Being Deceived.Suzanne Hamilton Risley - 2016 - Radical Philosophy Review 19 (2):381-407.
    Current struggles over laws prohibiting and criminalizing the public disclosure of violence in the spaces of animal use in the US have underscored the centrality of exposés to animal activism. This article complicates the activist belief in the power of exposure—“If slaughterhouses had glass walls...”—by drawing on the insights of Jean-Paul Sartre and Simone de Beauvoir concerning the prevalence of bad faith in systems of oppression and exploitation. I describe four forms of bad faith common to these systems, and offer (...)
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  13.  2
    Solidarity in Socialism.Richard Schmitt - 2016 - Radical Philosophy Review 19 (2):429-451.
    Socialism is meant to be democratic. Socialist democracy demands solidarity but it remains unclear what solidarity consists of. Theorists provide a range of different characterizations of solidarity which are adequate in their contexts but will not suffice as the basis for socialist democracy. This paper shows how we should not understand that needed solidarity; it is not merely a solidarity based on commonalities that overlooks difference. On the contrary, it needs to be a kind of solidarity that establishes close but (...)
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  14.  2
    Masculinity and the War on Terror.Shari Stone-Mediatore - 2016 - Radical Philosophy Review 19 (2):541-546.
  15.  4
    Leisure Is Not a Luxury.Joseph Trullinger - 2016 - Radical Philosophy Review 19 (2):453-473.
    This paper argues for the legitimacy of daydreaming as an important condition of a liberatory political vision, using a Marcusean framework to supplement and extend the critique of productivism recently made by Kathi Weeks. By differentiating free time from mere pastime, I show that daydreaming not only builds our political imagination, but it also reminds us of the value of unproductive free time. Situating Marcuse within a survey of the role of play and leisure in Aristotle, Schiller, and Marx, I (...)
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  16.  20
    Arguments Against Drone Warfare with a Focus on the Immorality of Remote Control Killing and "Deadly Surveillance".Harry van der Linden - 2016 - Radical Philosophy Review 19 (2):331-358.
    Drone warfare, particularly in the form of targeted killing, has serious legal, moral, and political costs so that a case can be made for an international treaty prohibiting this type of warfare. However, the case would be stronger if it could be shown that killing by drones is inherently immoral. From this angle I explore the moral significance of two features of this technology of killing: the killing is done by remote control with the operators geographically far away from the (...)
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  17.  2
    A Note From the Editor.Harry van der Linden - 2016 - Radical Philosophy Review 19 (2):3-3.
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  18.  3
    Freedom Is Not a Thing.Nicolas Veroli - 2016 - Radical Philosophy Review 19 (2):475-500.
    Beginning from a critique of neoliberalism, and in particular of its concept of freedom, I develop an alternative notion of freedom as love. In order to escape the current neoliberal hegemony, I argue that we must reconnect with the radical traditions of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. I thus take as my starting point the debate between Herbert Marcuse and Erich Fromm over the nature of freedom that took place in the pages of Dissent in the mid-1950s. Building on their (...)
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  19.  3
    Enjoy Responsibly.Jon Bailes - 2016 - Radical Philosophy Review 19 (1):239-262.
    This essay explores the lasting theoretical value of Marcuse’s “repressive desublimation” via the psychoanalytic concepts of Žižek and Lacan. It argues that Marcuse’s theory should be adapted to include Lacanian notions of death drive and enjoyment, but also that it remains particularly suitable to structurally define consumer capitalist ideologies that incorporate both drive and immediate gratification to reinforce institutional patriarchy. Combining the theories then reveals a paradoxical demand to “enjoy responsibly,” which engenders various indirect rationalizations of Marcuse’s “performance principle.” This (...)
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  20.  1
    One-Dimensionality and Organized Labor in the United States.Craig R. Christiansen - 2016 - Radical Philosophy Review 19 (1):197-213.
    The Marcusean concept of one-dimensionality is used to explore contradictions of organized labor. Since the original 1964 publication of One-Dimensional Man, the labor movement has suffered significant losses in membership and power. This essay examines the current relevance of Marcuse’s description of the increasing integration and collusion of organized labor with business, the loss of the union’s role as radical/revolutionary subject, and the containment of organized labor as an oppositional force. The specific mechanisms found in the structure, culture, logic, and (...)
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  21.  6
    The Politics of Meaning.Andrew Feenberg - 2016 - Radical Philosophy Review 19 (1):85-110.
    In One-Dimensional Man, Marcuse synthesized a wide range of ideas from the early Lukács, Husserl, Heidegger, and his colleagues, Horkheimer and Adorno. This synthesis is the culmination of the tradition of radical modernity critique that rose to prominence in the 1960s, providing the ideological basis for the New Left and its successor movements such as feminism and environmentalism. I develop an approach to this tradition in terms of the relation of function to meaning as it is reflected in the thought (...)
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  22.  7
    Herbert Marcuse and Social Media.Christian Fuchs - 2016 - Radical Philosophy Review 19 (1):111-141.
    This article reflects on the relevance of Herbert Marcuse’s philosophy of technology in the age social media. Although Marcuse did not experience the rise of the Internet, the World Wide Web, and “social media” as major means of communication, his insights about technological rationality, technology, and the role of technology in the context of labor allow us today to reflect on the relevance of Marcuse’s philosophy of technology for a critical theory of digital and social media.
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  23.  2
    An Explosive Catalyst in the Material Base.Christian Garland - 2016 - Radical Philosophy Review 19 (1):183-195.
    In the mid-twentieth century when One-Dimensional Man was first published, the rapid advance of technology was already beginning to render “labor”—that is, what is known as “work”—superfluous. In 2016, half a century later, the process of “work” is being made largely redundant, if not “unnecessary”: the material truth of capitalist society that can never be uttered since as “work” disappears, so does what was one of its functional cornerstones. This article seeks to contribute to identifying some of the trends in (...)
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  24.  4
    Reflections on Herbert Marcuse on the Fiftieth Anniversary of the Publication of One-Dimensional Man.Douglas Kellner - 2016 - Radical Philosophy Review 19 (1):23-41.
    I discuss how I came to read, interpret, understand, critique, and use One-Dimensional Man, and I consider the book’s reception and relevance in the 1960s when it appeared, suggesting how its ideas relate to experiences and developments within US society and global capitalism from the 1940s and 1950s. Then, I examine how the model of one-dimensional society was put in question by the struggles and upheavals of the 1960s, how Herbert Marcuse revised his model in the 1970s, and how it (...)
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  25.  1
    Accumulation of Crises, Abundance of Refusals.Andrew T. Lamas - 2016 - Radical Philosophy Review 19 (1):1-22.
    This is the introductory essay for the first of two special issues of Radical Philosophy Review marking the occasion of the fiftieth anniversary of the publication of one of the twentieth century’s most provocative, subversive, and widely read works of radical theory—Herbert Marcuse’s One-Dimensional Man, which we now reassess in an effort to contribute to the critical theory of our time. What are the possibilities and limits of our current situation? What are the prospects for moving beyond one-dimensionality? A summary (...)
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  26.  1
    The Relevance of an Untimely Book.Raffaele Laudani - 2016 - Radical Philosophy Review 19 (1):63-84.
    This essay discusses the relevance of Herbert Marcuse’s One-Dimensional Man for contemporary radical politics. It approaches the topic from an unconventional perspective: the untimely nature of One-Dimensional Man, i.e., its being conceived in the 1940s as an answer to the crisis of Marxism after the defeat of European communist revolutions in the early twentieth century, and published in the 1960s in the very moment when the postwar stabilization was to collapse. From this perspective, its relevance for a political theory and (...)
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  27.  4
    The Critique of Domination as Rational Dependency.Wolfgang Leo Maar - 2016 - Radical Philosophy Review 19 (1):215-226.
    For Herbert Marcuse, rationality today—amidst advanced capitalism and neoliberalism—is not confronted with an external irrational universal, as it was in the earlier period of liberalism. “General ‘harmony’” is converted into a goal that pacifies because it is technically feasible. Through the critique of everyday experiences, it is possible to distinguish between how individuals immediately appear in actual society and what is essential to society and humanity—by revealing the dependency on capital as a dehumanizing factor. Dependency remains hidden in the relations (...)
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  28.  1
    The Bi-Dimensionality of Marcuse’s Critical Psychoanalytical Model of Emancipation.Inara Luisa Marin - 2016 - Radical Philosophy Review 19 (1):227-238.
    The paper will examine the critical psychoanalytical model of emancipation proposed by Herbert Marcuse. I will show that Marcuse’s critical model has two moments; one that I call negative, formulated around the idea of repressive sublimation—as developed by Marcuse in One-Dimensional Man—and another one that I call normative, which finds its roots in a very peculiar reading of Freudian narcissism and leads to the idea of nonrepressive sublimation. By this reading of Marcuse, I hope to circumscribe the role of psychoanalysis (...)
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  29.  1
    Celebrating Herbert Marcuse's One-Dimensional Man.Charles Reitz - 2016 - Radical Philosophy Review 19 (1):43-61.
    In this historical contextualization of Herbert Marcuse’s One-Dimensional Man, I present critical arguments that Marcuse deploys in the US context—especially in light of the Civil Rights movement and the Vietnam War. I argue that Marcuse’s critical perspective worked to deprovincialize Anglo-American philosophy and to demythologize the extravagantly glorified and sanitized “American Pageant” view of the world that prevailed in the United States at the time and Marcuse’s critical pedagogy thus led to a revitalization and recovery of philosophy in the United (...)
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  30.  1
    End of Ideology” and the “Crisis of Marxism.Graeme Reniers - 2016 - Radical Philosophy Review 19 (1):263-284.
    Herbert Marcuse’s One-Dimensional Man is framed as a response to the “end of ideology” thesis of political equilibrium and a criticism of mainstream theoretical construction in advanced industrial countries. Such formulations obscured new forms of self-alienation in totally administered society, and replaced any conceived potential subjectivity with objective laws that govern social relations. One-Dimensional Man is also framed as a response to the “crisis of Marxism” by underscoring the importance of popular ideology in shaping subjective action, which at present, precludes (...)
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  31.  5
    Changes in Today’s Workplace and in Critical Social Theory.Russell Rockwell - 2016 - Radical Philosophy Review 19 (1):173-182.
    Marcuse’s One-Dimensional Man is a key text from within the Critical Theory tradition in terms of its utility for assessing today’s new stage of automated production, its impact on social relations, and the prospects for the type of challenge to capitalism that includes within it a concept of an achievable postcapitalist society. The interpretation here seeks to uncover the socially relevant dialectical relationship of the Grundrisse and Capital, which is in contrast to Marcuse’s theory, which holds that Marx, in Capital, (...)
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  32.  1
    Marcuse’s "Transcendent Project" at 50.Marcelo Vieta - 2016 - Radical Philosophy Review 19 (1):143-172.
    This article sets out to revisit Herbert Marcuse’s “transcendent project” of liberation, as well as his notion of “post-technological rationality,” which grounded this project, articulated in outline form in the last section of One-Dimensional Man and in fragments throughout his middle writings between 1955 and 1972. The aim is to assess this project’s continued validity for the struggle for alternatives to the disorganizations and enclosures of neoliberal capitalism and its perpetual moments of crises. This article first reviews Marcuse’s place within (...)
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