Results for 'Depression'

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  1. Depression and the Problem of Absent Desires.Ian Tully - 2017 - Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy 11 (2):1-16.
    I argue that consideration of certain cases of severe depression reveals a problem for desire-based theories of welfare. I first show that depression can result in a person losing her desires and then identify a case wherein it seems right to think that, as a result of very severe depression, the individuals described no longer have any desires whatsoever. I argue that the state these people are in is a state of profound ill-being: their lives are going (...)
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  2. Depression, Listlessness, and Moral Motivation.Michael Cholbi - 2011 - Ratio 24 (1):28-45.
    Motivational internalism (MI) holds that, necessarily, if an agent judges that she is morally obligated to ø, then, that agent is, to at least some minimal extent, motivated to ø. Opponents of MI sometimes invoke depression as a counterexample on the grounds that depressed individuals appear to sincerely affirm moral judgments but are ‘listless’ and unmotivated by such judgments. Such listlessness is a credible counterexample to MI, I argue, only if the actual clinical disorder of depression, rather than (...)
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  3.  57
    Depression and Decision-Making Capacity for Treatment or Research: A Systematic Review.Thomas Hindmarch, Matthew Hotopf & Gareth S. Owen - 2013 - BMC Medical Ethics 14 (1):54.
    Psychiatric disorders can pose problems in the assessment of decision-making capacity (DMC). This is so particularly where psychopathology is seen as the extreme end of a dimension that includes normality. Depression is an example of such a psychiatric disorder. Four abilities (understanding, appreciating, reasoning and ability to express a choice) are commonly assessed when determining DMC in psychiatry and uncertainty exists about the extent to which depression impacts capacity to make treatment or research participation decisions.
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  4.  94
    Depression and Embodiment: Phenomenological Reflections on Motility, Affectivity, and Transcendence.Kevin A. Aho - 2013 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (4):751-759.
    This paper integrates personal narratives with the methods of phenomenology in order to draw some general conclusions about ‘what it means’ and ‘what it feels like’ to be depressed. The analysis has three parts. First, it explores the ways in which depression disrupts everyday experiences of spatial orientation and motility. This disruption makes it difficult for the person to move and perform basic functional tasks, resulting in a collapse or contraction of the life-world. Second, it illustrates how depression (...)
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  5.  65
    Depression, Intercorporeality, and Interaffectivity.Thomas Fuchs - 2013 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 20 (7-8):7-8.
    According to current opinion in western psychopathology, depression is regarded as a disorder of mood and affect on the one hand, and as a distortion of cognition on the other. Disturbances of bodily experience and of social relations are regarded as secondary to the primarily 'inner'and individual disorder. However, quite different concepts can be found in cultures whose members do not experience themselves as much as separate individuals but rather as parts of social communities. Disorders of mood or well-being (...)
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  6. Depression as Existential Feeling or de-Situatedness? Distinguishing Structure From Mode in Psychopathology.Anthony Vincent Fernandez - 2014 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 13 (4):595-612.
    In this paper I offer an alternative phenomenological account of depression as consisting of a degradation of the degree to which one is situated in and attuned to the world. This account contrasts with recent accounts of depression offered by Matthew Ratcliffe and others. Ratcliffe develops an account in which depression is understood in terms of deep moods, or existential feelings, such as guilt or hopelessness. Such moods are capable of limiting the kinds of significance and meaning (...)
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  7. Depression and Suicide Are Natural Kinds: Implications for Physician-Assisted Suicide.Jonathan Y. Tsou - 2013 - International Journal of Law and Psychiatry 36 (5-6):461-470.
    In this article, I argue that depression and suicide are natural kinds insofar as they are classes of abnormal behavior underwritten by sets of stable biological mechanisms. In particular, depression and suicide are neurobiological kinds characterized by disturbances in serotonin functioning that affect various brain areas (i.e., the amygdala, anterior cingulate, prefrontal cortex, and hippocampus). The significance of this argument is that the natural (biological) basis of depression and suicide allows for reliable projectable inferences (i.e., predictions) to (...)
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  8.  30
    Depression: The Predisposing Influence of Stress.Hymie Anisman & Robert M. Zacharko - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (1):89-99.
    Aversive experiences have been thought to provoke or exacerbate clinical depression. The present review provides a brief survey of the stress-depression literature and suggests that the effects of stressful experiences on affective state may be related to depletion of several neurotransmitters, including norepinephrine, dopamine, and serotonin. A major element in determining the neurochemical changes is the organism's ability to cope with the aversive stimuli through behavioral means. Aversive experiences give rise to behavioral attempts to cope with the stressor, (...)
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  9. Depression, Guilt and Emotional Depth.Matthew Ratcliffe - 2010 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 53 (6):602-626.
    It is generally maintained that emotions consist of intentional states and /or bodily feelings. This paper offers a phenomenological analysis of guilt in severe depression, in order to illustrate how such conceptions fail to adequately accommodate a way in which some emotional experiences are said to be deeper than others. Many emotions are intentional states. However, I propose that the deepest emotions are not intentional but pre-intentional, meaning that they determine which kinds of intentional state are possible. I go (...)
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  10. Depression, Possibilities, and Competence: A Phenomenological Perspective. [REVIEW]Gerben Meynen - 2011 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 32 (3):181-193.
    Competent decision-making is required for informed consent. In this paper, I aim, from a phenomenological perspective, to identify the specific facets of competent decision-making that may form a challenge to depressed patients. On a phenomenological account, mood and emotions are crucial to the way in which human beings encounter the world. More precisely, mood is intimately related to the options and future possibilities we perceive in the world around us. I examine how possibilities should be understood in this context, and (...)
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  11. Depression and Motivation.Benedict Smith - 2013 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 12 (4):615-635.
    Among the characteristic features of depression is a diminishment in or lack of action and motivation. In this paper, I consider a dominant philosophical account which purports to explain this lack of action or motivation. This approach comes in different versions but a common theme is, I argue, an over reliance on psychologistic assumptions about action–explanation and the nature of motivation. As a corrective I consider an alternative view that gives a prominent place to the body in motivation. Central (...)
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  12.  84
    Patronizing Depression: Epistemic Injustice, Stigmatizing Attitudes, and the Need for Empathy.Jake Jackson - 2017 - Journal of Social Philosophy 48 (3):359-376.
    In this article, I examine stigmatizing and especially patronizing attitudes towards others’ depression that people who are well-intentioned produce. The strategy of the article is to consider the social experience of depression through two separate subfields of philosophy: epistemic injustice and phenomenology. The solution that I propose is a phenomenological account of empathy. The empathetic attitude that I argue for involves actively listening to the depressed individual and taking their depression testimony as direct evidence. The article has (...)
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  13. Depressive Delusions.Magdalena Antrobus & Lisa Bortolotti - 2016 - Filosofia Unisinos 17 (2):192-201.
    In this paper we have two main aims. First, we present an account of mood-congruent delusions in depression (hereafter, depressive delusions). We propose that depressive delusions constitute acknowledgements of self-related beliefs acquired as a result of a negatively biased learning process. Second, we argue that depressive delusions have the potential for psychological and epistemic benefits despite their obvious epistemic and psychological costs. We suggest that depressive delusions play an important role in preserving a person’s overall coherence and narrative identity (...)
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  14. An Expert System for Depression Diagnosis.Izzeddin A. Alshawwa, Mohammed Elkahlout, Hosni Qasim El-Mashharawi & Samy S. Abu-Naser - 2019 - International Journal of Academic Health and Medical Research (IJAHMR) 3 (4):20-27.
    Background: Depression (major depressive disorder) is a common and serious medical illness that negatively affects how you feel, the way you think and how you act. Fortunately, it is also treatable. Depression causes feelings of sadness and/or a loss of interest in activities once enjoyed. It can lead to a variety of emotional and physical problems and can decrease a person’s ability to function at work and at home. Depression affects an estimated one in 15 adults (6.7%) (...)
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  15.  64
    Demarcating Depression.Ian Tully - 2019 - Ratio 32 (2):114-121.
    How to draw the line between depression-as-disorder and non-pathological depressive symptoms continues to be a contested issue in psychiatry. Relatively few philosophers have waded into this debate, but the tools of philosophical analysis are quite relevant to it. In this paper, I defend a particular answer to this question, the Contextual approach.On this view, depression is a disorder if and only if it is a disproportionate response to a justifying cause or else is unconnected to any justifying cause. (...)
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  16.  90
    Depression as Unhomelike Being-in-the-World? Phenomenology’s Challenge to Our Understanding of Illness.Tamara Kayali & Furhan Iqbal - 2013 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (1):31-39.
    Fredrik Svenaeus has applied Heidegger’s concept of ‘being-in-the-world’ to health and illness. Health, Svenaeus contends, is a state of ‘homelike being-in-the-world’ characterised by being ‘balanced’ and ‘in-tune’ with the world. Illness, on the other hand, is a state of ‘unhomelike being-in-the-world’ characterised by being ‘off-balance’ and alienated from our own bodies. This paper applies the phenomenological concepts presented by Svenaeus to cases from a study of depression. In doing so, we show that while they can certainly enrich our understanding (...)
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  17.  68
    Experiences of Depression: A Study in Phenomenology.Matthew Ratcliffe - 2014 - Oxford University Press.
    Experiences of Depression is a philosophical exploration of what it is like to be depressed. In this important new book, Matthew Ratcliffe develops a detailed account of depression experiences by drawing on work in phenomenology, philosophy of mind and psychology, and several other disciplines.
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  18.  34
    Depression and Competence to Refuse Psychiatric Treatment.A. Rudnick - 2002 - Journal of Medical Ethics 28 (3):151-155.
    Individuals with major depression may benefit from psychiatric treatment, yet they may refuse such treatment, sometimes because of their depression. Hence the question is raised whether such individuals are competent to refuse psychiatric treatment. The standard notion of competence to consent to treatment, which refers to expression of choice, understanding of medical information, appreciation of the personal relevance of this information, and logical reasoning, may be insufficient to address this question. This is so because major depression may (...)
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  19.  29
    Hopelessness Depression: A Theory-Based Subtype of Depression.Lyn Y. Abramson, Gerald I. Metalsky & Lauren B. Alloy - 1989 - Psychological Review 96 (2):358-372.
  20.  22
    The Depressed Brain: An Evolutionary Systems Theory.Paul B. Badcock, Christopher G. Davey, Sarah Whittle, Nicholas B. Allen & Karl J. Friston - 2017 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 21 (3):182-194.
  21.  47
    Depression, Decisional Capacity, and Personal Autonomy.Lubomira V. Radoilska - unknown
    This chapter aims to address two related challenges the phenomenon of depression raises for theories which present autonomy as an agency concept and an independent source of justification. The first challenge is directed at an intuitive conception of intentional agency as implying a robust though not always direct link between evaluation and motivation, for in depression what appears to be choice-worthy does not get chosen. The second challenge targets the feasibility of a reliable distinction between autonomous and non-autonomous (...)
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  22. The Phenomenology of Depression and the Nature of Empathy.Matthew Ratcliffe - 2014 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 17 (2):269-280.
    This paper seeks to illuminate the nature of empathy by reflecting upon the phenomenology of depression. I propose that depression involves alteration of an aspect of experience that is seldom reflected upon or discussed, thus making it hard to understand. This alteration involves impairment or loss of a capacity for interpersonal relatedness that mutual empathy depends upon. The sufferer thus feels cut off from other people, and may remark on their indifference, hostility or inability to understand. Drawing upon (...)
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  23.  35
    Depressive Habituality and Altered Valuings. The Phenomenology of Depressed Mental Life.Jann E. Schlimme - 2013 - Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 44 (1):92-118.
    Phenomenological descriptions of depressed mental life offer a profound understanding of depression from the first-person perspective. In this paper, such descriptions are developed by drawing on the work by Ludwig Binswanger and on the autobiographical report of depression by Piet C. Kuiper . I will argue that Binswanger’s central claim in his phenomenological description of the depressed state of mind fails due to crucial misunderstandings of Edmund Husserl’s phenomenology. Nonetheless, by drawing on Kuiper’s first-hand account, I will develop (...)
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  24.  30
    Encountering Depression In-Depth : An Existential-Phenomenological Approach to Selfhood, Depression, and Psychiatric Practice.Patrick Seniuk - 2020 - Dissertation, Södertörn University
    This dissertation in Theory of Practical Knowledge contends that depression is a disorder of the self. Using the existential-phenomenology of Maurice Merleau-Ponty, I argue that if we want to disclose the basic structure of depressed experience, then we must likewise disclose how selfexperience is inseparable from depressed experience. However, even though depression is a contemporary psychiatric category of illness, it is nevertheless a historically and heterogenous concept. To make sense of depression in the context of contemporary psychiatric (...)
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  25. 'Is Depression a Sin or a Disease?' A Critique of Moralising and Medicalising Models of Mental Illness.Anastasia Philoppa Scrutton - forthcoming - Journal of Religion and Disability.
    Moralising accounts of depression include the idea that depression is a sin or the result of sin, and/or that it is the result of demonic possession which has occurred because of moral or spiritual failure. Increasingly some Christian communities, understandably concerned about the debilitating effects these views have on people with depression, have adopted secular folk psychiatry’s ‘medicalising’ campaign, emphasising that depression is an illness for which, like (so-called) physical illnesses, experients should not be held responsible. (...)
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  26. Depression in the Context of Disability and the “Right to Die”.Carol J. Gill - 2004 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 25 (3):171-198.
    Arguments in favor of legalized assisted suicide often center on issues of personal privacy and freedom of choice over one's body. Many disability advocates assert, however, that autonomy arguments neglect the complex sociopolitical determinants of despair for people with disabilities. Specifically, they argue that social approval of suicide for individuals with irreversible conditions is discriminatory and that relaxing restrictions on assisted suicide would jeopardize, not advance, the freedom of persons with disabilities to direct the lives they choose. This paper examines (...)
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  27.  6
    Depression, Emotion and the Self: Philosophical and Interdisciplinary Perspectives.Matthew Ratcliffe & Achim Stephan (eds.) - 2014 - Imprint Academic.
    This volume addresses the question of what it is like to be depressed. Despite the vast amount of research that has been conducted into the causes and treatment of depression, the experience of depression remains poorly understood. Indeed, many depression memoirs state that the experience is impossible for others to understand. However, it is at least clear that changes in emotion, mood, and bodily feeling are central to all forms of depression, and these are the book's (...)
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  28.  67
    Depression and the Self Bodily Resonance and Attuned Being-in-the-World.Fredrik Svenaeus - 2013 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 20 (7-8):7-8.
    This paper will explore the relationship between selfhood and depression, by focusing upon the lived body's capacity to 'resonate'with the world and thus open up an 'attuned' space of meaning. Persons will become differently tuned in different situations because they embody different patterns of resonance -- what is most often referred to as different temperaments -- but the self may also suffer from idiosyncrasies in mood profile that develop into deficiencies of resonance, making the person in question ill. In (...)
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  29.  52
    Affectivity and Narrativity in Depression: A Phenomenological Study.Anna Bortolan - 2017 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 20 (1):77-88.
    In this study I explore from a phenomenological perspective the relationship between affectivity and narrative self-understanding in depression. Phenomenological accounts often conceive of the disorder as involving disturbances of the narrative self and suggest that these disturbances are related to the alterations of emotions and moods typical of the illness. In this paper I expand these accounts by advancing two sets of claims. In the first place, I suggest that, due to the loss of feeling characteristic of the illness, (...)
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  30.  15
    Multiple Depression: Making Mood Manageable.Ilpo Helén - 2007 - Journal of Medical Humanities 28 (3):149-172.
    The subject of this paper is the problematisation of depression in today’s mental health care. It is based on a study of the professional discussion on depression in Finland from the mid-1980s to the 1990s. The ways in which Finnish mental health experts define the object of depression treatment bring out an ambivalence that stems from the discrepancy between two parallel but incongruent notions of what depression is: the psychopharmacological and the psychotherapeutic. The analysis of the (...)
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  31.  8
    Depressive Realism and Outcome Density Bias in Contingency Judgments: The Effect of the Context and Intertrial Interval.Rachel M. Msetfi, Robin A. Murphy, Jane Simpson & Diana E. Kornbrot - 2005 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 134 (1):10-22.
  32.  6
    Depressive Deficits in Memory: Focusing Attention Improves Subsequent Recall.Paula T. Hertel & Stephanie S. Rude - 1991 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 120 (3):301-309.
  33.  30
    Dopamine, Schizophrenia, Mania, and Depression: Toward a Unified Hypothesis of Cortico-Striatopallido-Thalamic Function.Neal R. Swerdlow & George F. Koob - 1987 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 10 (2):197-208.
  34. Reflective Blindness, Depression and Unpleasant Experiences.Elizabeth Ventham - 2019 - Analysis 79 (4):684-693.
    This paper defends a desire-based understanding of pleasurable and unpleasant experiences. More specifically, the thesis is that what makes an experience pleasant/unpleasant is the subject having a certain kind of desire about that experience. I begin by introducing the ‘Desire Account’ in more detail, and then go on to explain and refute a prominent set of contemporary counter-examples, based on subjects who might have ‘Reflective Blindness’, looking particularly at the example of subjects with depression. I aim to make the (...)
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  35.  21
    Borderline Depression A Desperate Vitality.Giovanni Stanghellini & René Rosfort - 2013 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 20 (7-8):7-8.
    Persons with borderline personality disorder are often described as affected by extreme emotional fluctuations and by the sudden emergence of uncontrollable and disproportionate emotional reactions. Borderline persons frequently experience their own self as dim and fuzzy, are deprived of a stable sense of identity and unable to be steadily involved in a given life project. We will interpret these typical features as fluctuations between a clearly normative emotion such as anger and the more diffuse and confusing background of bad moods (...)
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  36.  2
    Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Among Healthcare Workers During the COVID-19 Outbreak and Relationships With Expressive Flexibility and Context Sensitivity.Vittorio Lenzo, Maria C. Quattropani, Alberto Sardella, Gabriella Martino & George A. Bonanno - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    This study aimed at investigating depression, anxiety, and stress symptoms among healthcare workers and examine the role of expressive flexibility and context sensitivity as key components of resilience in understanding reported symptoms. We hypothesized a significant and different contribution of resilience components in explaining depression, anxiety, and stress. A total sample of 218 Italian healthcare workers participated in this study through an online survey during the lockdown, consequently to the COVID-19. The Depression Anxiety Stress Scales-21 was used (...)
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  37.  65
    Black Sun: Depression and Melancholia.Julia Kristeva - 1992 - Columbia University Press.
    Looks at the psychological nature of depression and discusses its portrayal in literature and art.
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  38.  18
    The Depressed Patient in a Biological World: On Philosophical and Diagnostic Strategies.Jakob Korf & Fokko Bosker - 2013 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 19 (3):514-521.
  39.  44
    Depressive Illness Delayed Hamlet's Revenge.A. B. Shaw - 2002 - Medical Humanities 28 (2):92-96.
    If Hamlet had not delayed his revenge there would have been no play. Many explanations of the delay have been offered in the last four centuries. None is convincing. The interpretation which best fits the evidence best is that Hamlet was suffering from an acute depressive illness, with some obsessional features. He could not make a firm resolve to act. In Shakespeare’s time there was no concept of acute depressive illness, although melancholy was well known. Melancholy, however, would have been (...)
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  40.  14
    Anxiety, Depression, and the Suicidal Spectrum: A Latent Class Analysis of Overlapping and Distinctive Features.Matthew C. Podlogar, Megan L. Rogers, Ian H. Stanley, Melanie A. Hom, Bruno Chiurliza & Thomas E. Joiner - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 32 (7):1464-1477.
    ABSTRACTAnxiety and depression diagnoses are associated with suicidal thoughts and behaviours. However, a categorical understanding of these associations limits insight into identifying dimensional mechanisms of suicide risk. This study investigated anxious and depressive features through a lens of suicide risk, independent of diagnosis. Latent class analysis of 97 depression, anxiety, and suicidality-related items among 616 psychiatric outpatients indicated a 3-class solution, specifically: a higher suicide-risk class uniquely differentiated from both other classes by high reported levels of depression (...)
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  41.  13
    Depressive Symptoms and Associated Psychosocial Factors Among Adolescent Survivors 30 Months After 2008 Wenchuan Earthquake: A Follow-Up Study. [REVIEW]Xuliang Shi, Nancy X. Yu, Ya Zhou, Fulei Geng & Fang Fan - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  42.  16
    Depression, Hopelessness, and Complicated Grief in Survivors of Suicide.Samantha Bellini, Denise Erbuto, Karl Andriessen, Mariantonietta Milelli, Marco Innamorati, David Lester, Gaia Sampogna, Andrea Fiorillo & Maurizio Pompili - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
  43.  13
    Burnout, Depression, and Borderline Personality: A 1,163-Participant Study.Renzo Bianchi, Jean-Pierre Rolland & Jesús F. Salgado - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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  44.  5
    The Depression Anxiety Stress Scale-21 in Chinese Hospital Workers: Reliability, Latent Structure, and Measurement Invariance Across Genders.Li-Chen Jiang, Ya-jun Yan, Zhi-Shuai Jin, Mu-Li Hu, Ling Wang, Yu Song, Na-Ni Li, Jun Su, Da-Xing Wu & Tao Xiao - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
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  45.  51
    Depression, Depth, and the Imagination.Jennifer Church - 2003 - In J. Philips & James Morley (eds.), Imagination and its Pathologies. MIT Press. pp. 335--360.
  46.  4
    Depression According to ICD-10 Clinical Interview Vs. Depression According to the Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale to Predict Pain Therapy Outcomes.Sabine Fiegl, Claas Lahmann, Teresa O’Rourke, Thomas Probst & Christoph Pieh - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
  47.  14
    Depression and Rumination: Relation to Components of Inhibition.Ulrike Zetsche, Catherine D'Avanzato & Jutta Joormann - 2012 - Cognition and Emotion 26 (4):758-767.
  48.  10
    Depressive Symptoms and Cognitive Control in a Mixed Antisaccade Task: Specific Effects of Depressive Rumination.Evi De Lissnyder, Nazanin Derakshan, Rudi De Raedt & Ernst H. W. Koster - 2011 - Cognition and Emotion 25 (5):886-897.
  49.  99
    Distorted Packaging: Marketing Depression as Illness, Drugs as Cure.Paula Gardner - 2003 - Journal of Medical Humanities 24 (1/2):105-130.
    Prominent consumer depression manuals issued in recent years circulate a standard depression script as scientific knowledge. The script, asserting that a broad spectrum of depressions are brain illnesses that require antidepressant treatment, is in fact highly contested among researchers. This paper reviews the logical problematics of these manuals, and how such discourse promotes the diagnosis and pharmaceutical treatment of behaviors ranging from mild symptoms to severe depression. In keeping with the trends of pharmaceutical advertising and State health (...)
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  50.  77
    Sick and Tired: Depression in the Margins of Academic Philosophy.Maren Behrensen & Sofia Kaliarnta - 2017 - Topoi 36 (2):355-364.
    This paper is a reflection on Peter Railton’s keynote speech at the Central APA in February 2015, especially on his disclosure of his struggle with clinical depression. Without attempting to deny the significance of Prof. Railton’s outing, we want to draw attention here to something that did not prominently figure in his speech: structural features of the philosophical profession that make people sick. In particular, we focus on the “ideology of smartness” in philosophy and how it creates a pathological (...)
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