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  1. On the Subject Matter of Phenomenological Psychopathology.Anthony Vincent Fernandez & Allan Køster - forthcoming - In Giovanni Stanghellini, Matthew Broome, Anthony Vincent Fernandez, Paolo Fusar-Poli, Andrea Raballo & René Rosfort (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Phenomenological Psychopathology.
    “On the Subject Matter of Phenomenological Psychopathology” provides a framework for the phenomenological study of mental disorders. The framework relies on a distinction between (ontological) existentials and (ontic) modes. Existentials are the categorial structures of human existence, such as intentionality, temporality, selfhood, and affective situatedness. Modes are the particular, concrete phenomena that belong to these categorial structures, with each existential having its own set of modes. In the first section, we articulate this distinction by drawing primarily on the work of (...)
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  2. Psychiatry Should Not Seek Mechanisms of Disorder.Daniel F. Hartner & Kari L. Theurer - 2018 - Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 38 (4):189-204.
    What kind of thing is a psychiatric disorder? At present, this is the central question in the philosophy of psychiatry. Answers tend toward one of two opposing views: realism, the view that psychiatric disorders are natural kinds, and constructivism, the view that disorders are products of classificatory conventions. The difficulties with each are well rehearsed. One compelling third-way solution, developed by Peter Zachar, holds that disorders are practical kinds. Proponents of this view are left with the difficult task of explaining (...)
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  3. Let Them Eat Prozac: The Unhealthy Relationship Between the Pharmaceutical Industry and Depression by David Healy. [REVIEW]Leemon B. McHenry - 2007 - Mens Sana Monographs 5 (1):228-232.
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  4. Industry-Corrupted Psychiatric Trials.Leemon McHenry, Jon Jureidini & Jay Amsterdam - 2017 - Psychiatria Polska 51 (6):993-1008.
    The goal of this paper is to expose the research misconduct of pharmaceutical industry-sponsored clinical trials via three short case studies of corrupted psychiatric trials that were conducted in the United States. We discuss the common elements that enable the misrepresentation of clinical trial results including ghostwriting for medical journals, the role of key opinion leaders as co-conspirators with the pharmaceutical industry and the complicity of top medical journals in failing to uphold standards of science and peer review. We conclude (...)
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  5. Disordered Existentiality: Mental Illness and Heidegger’s Philosophy of Dasein.Schmid Jelscha - 2018 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 17 (3):485-502.
    In this paper, I propose an existentialist-phenomenological model that conceives of mental illness through the terminology of Heidegger’s Being and Time. In particular, the concepts of existentiality, disturbance and the relation between ‘being-with’ and ‘the one’, will be implemented in order to reconstruct the experience of mental illness. The proposed model understands mental illness as a disturbance of a person’s existentiality. More precisely, mental illness is conceptualized as the disturbance of a person’s existential structure, the process of which leads to (...)
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  6. Petr Kouba: The Phenomenon of Mental Disorder: Perspectives of Heidegger’s Thought in Psychopathology. [REVIEW]Anthony Vincent Fernandez - 2017 - Human Studies 40 (1):145-150.
  7. Affectivity and Narrativity in Depression: A Phenomenological Study.Anna Bortolan - 2017 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 20 (1):77-88.
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  8. Bipolar 1 As Graphic Memoir.Ellen Forney - 2016 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 13 (4):505-506.
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  9. A Conception of Personality.Norvin Richards - 1986 - Behavior and Philosophy 14 (2):147.
    This paper offers a way to construe personality as the relatively stable hierarchy of one's desires: the fact that one prefers solitude to competition , finds dishonesty more aversive than arrogance , and so on. Several measures of the intensity of a desire are discussed: the alacrity with which one seeks to satisfy it, the persistence in one's efforts to do so, and other displays of one's willingness to sacrifice for its satisfaction. A method is offered for distinguishing preferences which (...)
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  10. Are Mental Disorders Natural Kinds?: A Plea for a New Approach to Intervention in Psychiatry.Şerife Tekin - 2016 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 23 (2):147-163.
    Mental disorder is an urgent and growing public health problem.1 Scientific investigation of this problem has the pragmatic goals of identifying the causes of mental disorders and developing strategies to effectively treat them. Philosophers of psychiatry have participated in the inquiry into the empirical examination of mental disorders, predominantly by debating whether psychopathology is a legitimate target of scientific inquiry and, if so, how mental disorders should be explained, predicted, and intervened on. However, as I show in this paper, these (...)
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  11. Philosophy and Madness. Radical Turns in the Natural Attitude to Life.Wouter Kusters - 2016 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 23 (2):129-146.
    In this article, I examine the relation between philosophy and madness. It is often assumed that madness has to be suppressed, excluded, or conquered before a philosophically sensible text, logical argument, or world of meaning can appear. I argue, instead, that a certain concept of madness, when grafted on phenomenological psychiatry and philosophical mysticism, is intrinsically related to the project of philosophy. With the help of experiences of madness as presented in psychiatry and articulated in mad autobiographical reports, including my (...)
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  12. First Do No Harm?: What Role Should Considerations of Potential Harm Play in Revising the DSM?Rachel Cooper - 2016 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 23 (2):103-113.
    Guidelines for revisions to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th edition asked those proposing certain types of revision to consider potential harms to patients. Specifically, those proposing new diagnoses were to consider whether ‘the harm that arises from the adoption of the proposed diagnosis exceed[s] the benefit that would accrue to affected individuals’, and potential for harm was cited as a possible reason for keeping a diagnosis in the appendix rather than promoting it to the main classification. The (...)
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  13. Love's Exemplars: A Response to Gupta, Earp, and Savulescu.Andrew McGee - 2016 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 23 (2):101-102.
    I am grateful to Brian Earp, Julian Savulescu, and Kristina Gupta for their thoughtful remarks on my paper. I cannot answer all of their points here, but select what I consider to be the most important. Gupta believes that I commit myself to “a common sense” account of love. This is not so. “Common sense” refers to beliefs, not concepts. Concepts can be used to express true, false, and diametrically opposed beliefs, so are not themselves beliefs; rather, they are the (...)
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  14. What Came First, the Chicken or the Egg? The Model of Circularity as a Model of Mutual Referentiality.D. Gasparyan - 2016 - Constructivist Foundations 12 (1):21-23.
    Open peer commentary on the article “Circularity and the Micro-Macro-Difference” by Manfred Füllsack. Upshot: I offer two additional illustrations from language and social theory in which Füllsack’s model perfectly works and present my own interpretation of his model, which I prefer to call a “model of mutual referentiality.”.
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  15. A Neurocomputational Model for the Relation Between Hunger, Dopamine and Action Rate.Abhinandan Basu, Ashish Gupta & Lovekesh Vig - 2011 - Journal of Intelligent Systems 20 (4):373-393.
    A number of conditioning experiments utilize food as a reward. Hunger is considered to be a critical factor governing the animal's behavior in these experiments. Despite its significance, most theories of animal conditioning fail to take hunger into consideration while analyzing the behavioral data. In this paper, we analyze the neuroscientific data supporting the hypothesis that hunger and food consumption affect the brain's dopamine system, which in turn governs the animal's behavior. According to this hypothesis, chronic hunger results in a (...)
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  16. The Continuum of Conscientiousness: The Antagonistic Interests Among Obsessive and Antisocial Personalities.Steven C. Hertler - 2014 - Polish Psychological Bulletin 45 (2):167-178.
    The five factor trait of conscientiousnessis a supertrait, denoting on one hand a pattern of excessive labor, rigidity, orderliness and compulsivity,and on the other hand a pattern of strict rectitude, scrupulosity, dutifulness and morality. In both respects the obsessive-compulsive personality is conscientious; indeed, it has been labeled a disorder of extreme conscientiousness. Antisocial personality disorder, in the present paper, is described as occupying the opposite end of the conscientiousness continuum. The antisocial is impulsive rather than compulsive, illicit rather than licit, (...)
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  17. The Continuum of Conscientiousness: The Antagonistic Interests Among Obsessive and Antisocial Personalities.Steven C. Hertler - 2014 - Polish Psychological Bulletin 45 (1):52-63.
    The five factor trait of conscientiousness is a supertrait, denoting on one hand a pattern of excessive labor, rigidity, orderliness and compulsivity, and on the other hand a pattern of strict rectitude, scrupulosity, dutifulness and morality. In both respects the obsessive-compulsive personality is conscientious; indeed, it has been labeled a disorder of extreme conscientiousness. Antisocial personality disorder, in the present paper, is described as occupying the opposite end of the conscientiousness continuum. The antisocial is impulsive rather than compulsive, illicit rather (...)
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  18. Erratum To: Variations in the Anisotropy and Affine Structure of Visual Space: A Geometry of Visibles with a Third Dimension.Mark Wagner & Anthony J. Gambino - 2016 - Topoi 35 (2):599-599.
  19. Mind, Meaning, and Mental Disorder: The Nature of Causal Explanation in Psychology and Psychiatry.Shaun Nichols, Derek Bolton & Jonathan Hill - 1999 - Philosophical Review 108 (4):559.
  20. Empathy’s Blind Spot.Jan Slaby - 2014 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 17 (2):249-258.
  21. What is Called Symptom?Thor Eirik Eriksen & Mette Bech Risør - 2014 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 17 (1):89-102.
    There is one concept in medicine which is prominent, the symptom. The omnipresence of the symptom seems, however, not to be reflected by an equally prominent curiosity aimed at investigating this concept as a phenomenon. In classic, traditional or conventional medical diagnostics and treatment, the lack of distinction with respect to the symptom represents a minor problem. Faced with enigmatic conditions and their accompanying labels such as chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia, medically unexplained symptoms, and functional somatic syndromes, the contestation of (...)
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  22. The Phenomenology of Depression and the Nature of Empathy.Matthew Ratcliffe - 2014 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 17 (2):269-280.
    This paper seeks to illuminate the nature of empathy by reflecting upon the phenomenology of depression. I propose that depression involves alteration of an aspect of experience that is seldom reflected upon or discussed, thus making it hard to understand. This alteration involves impairment or loss of a capacity for interpersonal relatedness that mutual empathy depends upon. The sufferer thus feels cut off from other people, and may remark on their indifference, hostility or inability to understand. Drawing upon the example (...)
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  23. Depression as Unhomelike Being-in-the-World? Phenomenology’s Challenge to Our Understanding of Illness.Tamara Kayali & Furhan Iqbal - 2013 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (1):31-39.
    Fredrik Svenaeus has applied Heidegger’s concept of ‘being-in-the-world’ to health and illness. Health, Svenaeus contends, is a state of ‘homelike being-in-the-world’ characterised by being ‘balanced’ and ‘in-tune’ with the world. Illness, on the other hand, is a state of ‘unhomelike being-in-the-world’ characterised by being ‘off-balance’ and alienated from our own bodies. This paper applies the phenomenological concepts presented by Svenaeus to cases from a study of depression. In doing so, we show that while they can certainly enrich our understanding of (...)
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  24. The Relationship Between Personality and Knowledge Implied in Jacques Maritain’s Theory of Personality.Chan-Hee Han - 2016 - The Journal of Moral Education 28 (2):125.
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  25. When the Body Becomes the Enemy: Disownership Toward the Body.Yochai Ataria - 2016 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 23 (1):1-15.
    Based on interviews with more than 70 survivors of traumatic events, Ataria presents a trade-off model between the sense of agency—the feeling that one has a sense of control over one’s actions—and the sense of body ownership, the sense that this is my body. According to this trade-off model, there exists a reciprocal relationship between the sense of agency and sense of body ownership: by relinquishing a degree of the sense of body ownership over his body, the subject gains an (...)
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  26. Agency in the Absence of Reason-Responsiveness: The Case of Dispositional Impulsivity in Personality Disorders.Gloria Ayob - 2016 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 23 (1):61-73.
    It has recently been argued that persons diagnosed with a personality disorder ought to be held responsible for their actions because these actions are voluntary. Defending this claim, Hannah Pickard contends that exercising choice and control are definitive of voluntary action, and that the behaviors that are constitutive of PD are behaviors over which we have choice and control. Thus PD behaviors are voluntary, and on this basis, their agents can be held properly responsible for this type of behavior. In (...)
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  27. Disease, Variety, Disagreement, and Typicality: Advantage Roschian Concepts?Neil Pickering - 2016 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 23 (1):17-31.
    Should we be Roschians about the concept of disease, rather than taking a classical approach? A classical concept of disease defines disease in terms of necessary and sufficient conditions; any things and only things which meet this definition are members of the class. In Roschian concepts of disease, it is supposed that degree of similarity to a prototype determines membership in the class of diseases. In this paper, the two approaches are pitched against one another in a series of tests (...)
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  28. Personality and Dangerousness: Genealogies of Antisocial Personality Disorder.David McCallum - 2001 - Cambridge University Press.
    In the aftermath of the Port Arthur shootings, Dunblane or the schoolyard killings in America, communities try to come to terms with private and public trauma and there is a need to understand what kind of person can commit such terrible acts. The problem of how to understand dangerousness often centres on the role of the mental health and criminal justice systems and it is from the intersection of these two institutions that the categorisation of dangerous persons has emerged. This (...)
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  29. Making Minds and Madness: From Hysteria to Depression.Mikkel Borch-Jacobsen - 2009 - Cambridge University Press.
    Why do 'maladies of the soul' such as hysteria, anxiety disorders, or depression wax and wane over time? Through a study of the history of psychiatry, Mikkel Borch-Jacobsen provocatively argues that most mental illnesses are not, in fact, diseases but the product of varying expectations shared and negotiated by therapists and patients. With a series of fascinating historical vignettes, stretching from Freud's creation of false memories of sexual abuse in his early hysterical patients to today's promotion and marketing of depression (...)
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  30. 2. Scientific Insight.Hugo A. Meynell - 1991 - In An Introduction to the Philosophy of Bernard Lonergan. University of Toronto Press. pp. 17-47.
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  31. Social Psychology. Abraham MyersonHabits: Their Making and Unmaking. Knight DunlapCase Studies in the Psychopathology of Crime. Ben Karpman. [REVIEW]Harold D. Lasswell - 1935 - International Journal of Ethics 45 (3):369-370.
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  32. Recovery Through Revolution. Samuel D. Schmalhausen.H. W. Wright - 1934 - International Journal of Ethics 44 (3):364-367.
  33. Psychopathology and Politics. Harold D. Lasswell.Max Handman - 1933 - International Journal of Ethics 43 (4):462-465.
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  34. The Educational Meaning of 'Serious Mind' and 'Right Mind' : An Interpretation of 「Taekyosinki」.Young-Chul Kim - 2005 - Journal of Moral Education 17 (1):133.
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  35. Impact of Multiple Factors on the Degree of Tinnitus Distress.Petra Brüggemann, Agnieszka J. Szczepek, Matthias Rose, Laurence McKenna, Heidi Olze & Birgit Mazurek - 2016 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 10.
  36. Corticostriatal Dysfunction in Huntington’s Disease: The Basics.Kendra D. Bunner & George V. Rebec - 2016 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 10.
  37. Correcting for Blood Arrival Time in Global Mean Regression Enhances Functional Connectivity Analysis of Resting State fMRI-BOLD Signals.Sinem B. Erdoğan, Yunjie Tong, Lia M. Hocke, Kimberly P. Lindsey & Blaise deB Frederick - 2016 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 10.
  38. Reproducibility of Neurochemical Profile Quantification in Pregenual Cingulate, Anterior Midcingulate, and Bilateral Posterior Insular Subdivisions Measured at 3 Tesla.Nuno M. P. de Matos, Lukas Meier, Michael Wyss, Dieter Meier, Andreas Gutzeit, Dominik A. Ettlin & Mike Brügger - 2016 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 10.
  39. Alien Hand, Restless Brain: Salience Network and Interhemispheric Connectivity Disruption Parallel Emergence and Extinction of Diagonistic Dyspraxia.Ben Ridley, Marion Beltramone, Jonathan Wirsich, Arnaud Le Troter, Eve Tramoni, Sandrine Aubert, Sophie Achard, Jean-Philippe Ranjeva, Maxime Guye & Olivier Felician - 2016 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 10.
  40. Intermittent Theta Burst Stimulation Increases Reward Responsiveness in Individuals with Higher Hedonic Capacity.Romain Duprat, Rudi De Raedt, Guo-Rong Wu & Chris Baeken - 2016 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 10.
  41. Bodily Experience in Schizophrenia: Factors Underlying a Disturbed Sense of Body Ownership.Maayke Klaver & H. Chris Dijkerman - 2016 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 10.
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  42. Differing Connectivity of Exner’s Area for Numbers and Letters.Elise Klein, Klaus Willmes, Stefanie Jung, Stefan Huber, Lucia W. Braga & Korbinian Moeller - 2016 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 10.
  43. Characterization of Face-Selective Patches in Orbitofrontal Cortex.Vanessa Troiani, Chase C. Dougherty, Andrew M. Michael & Ingrid R. Olson - 2016 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 10.
  44. Why a Comprehensive Understanding of Mental Workload Through the Measurement of Neurovascular Coupling Is a Key Issue for Neuroergonomics?Kevin Mandrick, Zarrin Chua, Mickaël Causse, Stéphane Perrey & Frédéric Dehais - 2016 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 10.
  45. Saccade Adaptation and Visual Uncertainty.David Souto, Karl R. Gegenfurtner & Alexander C. Schütz - 2016 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 10.
  46. The Left Fusiform Gyrus is a Critical Region Contributing to the Core Behavioral Profile of Semantic Dementia.Junhua Ding, Keliang Chen, Yan Chen, Yuxing Fang, Qing Yang, Yingru Lv, Nan Lin, Yanchao Bi, Qihao Guo & Zaizhu Han - 2016 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 10.
  47. Predicting Treatment Outcomes From Prefrontal Cortex Activation for Self-Harming Patients with Borderline Personality Disorder: A Preliminary Study.Anthony C. Ruocco, Achala H. Rodrigo, Shelley F. McMain, Elizabeth Page-Gould, Hasan Ayaz & Paul S. Links - 2016 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 10.
  48. Modulation of the Default Mode Network in First-Episode, Drug-Naïve Major Depressive Disorder Via Acupuncture at Baihui Acupoint.Demao Deng, Hai Liao, Gaoxiong Duan, Yanfei Liu, Qianchao He, Huimei Liu, Lijun Tang, Yong Pang & Jien Tao - 2016 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 10.
  49. Commentary: The Role of the Parietal Cortex in the Representation of Task–Reward Associations.Elger L. Abrahamse & Massimo Silvetti - 2016 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 10.
  50. Muscle Relaxation of the Foot Reduces Corticospinal Excitability of Hand Muscles and Enhances Intracortical Inhibition.Kouki Kato, Tetsuro Muraoka, Nobuaki Mizuguchi, Kento Nakagawa, Hiroki Nakata & Kazuyuki Kanosue - 2016 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 10.
1 — 50 / 2620