Results for 'Francois du Bois'

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  1.  38
    Review of Du Bois, Francois and Antje du Bois-Pedain (Eds.) Justice and Reconciliation in Post-Apartheid South Africa. [REVIEW]P. Lenta - 2009 - South African Journal of Philosophy 28 (2):259-260.
    Review of Du Bois, Francois and Antje du Bois-Pedain (eds.) Justice and Reconciliation in Post-Apartheid South Africa (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008).
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  2.  2
    Fragments d’histoire II : la vaisselle de table et du quotidien à Nicosie au lendemain de la conquête ottomane.Véronique François - 2017 - Bulletin de Correspondance Hellénique 141:353-387.
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  3.  4
    Vers une redéfinition typologique et analytique des céramiques du type Zeuxippus Ware.Yona Waksman & Véronique François - 2004 - Bulletin de Correspondance Hellénique 128 (21):629-724.
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  4. Dans l'atelier du traducteur de poèmes.Rose-Marie François - 1999 - Cahiers Internationaux de Symbolisme 92:73-84.
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  5.  2
    Ontologies du Conflit.Cristiana Asavoaie, Anna Bonalume, Arnaud Francois, Diana Margarit, Oriane Petteni, Petre Prasek & Ovidiu Stanciu - 2017 - Meta: Research in Hermeneutics, Phenomenology, and Practical Philosophy 9 (1):321-346.
    This article embodies the result of a collective work that seeks to understand the manner in which the notion of conflict is transformed by the attempt to apply it to reality, according to the doctrines hereby comprise as “ontologies of conflict”. It seems that there are three resulting “logics of conflict” which may receive the following qualifications: logic of contradiction, logic of contrariety and logic of difference.
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  6.  1
    Poteries des Fosses Dépotoirs du Site de L’Archiepiskopi À Nicosie.Véronique François - 2017 - Bulletin de Correspondance Hellénique 141:821-895.
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  7.  1
    L’influence du bergsonisme sur la philosophie japonaise : les cas de Nishida et Kuki.Arnaud François - 2013 - Alter: revue de phénoménologie 21:299-314.
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  8.  4
    L'épisode interpolé du « Roman de la violette » en prose.Charles François - 1932 - Revue Belge de Philologie Et D’Histoire 11 (3):689-698.
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  9.  5
    Scheler Et la Question du Monde de la Vie : Entre Pragmatisme Et Phénoménologie.Arnaud François - 2011 - Philosophie 108 (1):55.
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  10.  4
    « Floire et Blancheflor » : du chemin de Compostelle au chemin de la Mecque.Charles François - 1966 - Revue Belge de Philologie Et D’Histoire 44 (3):833-858.
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  11. Lettre De Jacques Groslot, Bailli D'orléans Au Cardinal Jean Du Bellay.Michel François - 1941 - Bibliothèque d'Humanisme Et Renaissance 1:193-196.
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  12.  4
    Social Stratification in Polynesia.Cora Du Bois & Marshall D. Sahlins - 1959 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 79 (1):71.
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  13.  9
    Women in the New Asia: The Changing Social Roles of Men and Women in South and South-East Asia.Cora Du Bois & Barbara E. Ward - 1965 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 85 (4):605.
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  14.  4
    The Malays: A Cultural History.Cora Du Bois & Richard Winstedt - 1952 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 72 (2):85.
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  15.  6
    Indonesia.Cora Du Bois & Ruth T. McVey - 1964 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 84 (2):203.
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  16. Haeckel and du Bois-Reymond: Rival German Darwinists.Gabriel Finkelstein - 2019 - Theory in Biosciences:1-8.
    Ernst Haeckel and Emil du Bois-Reymond were the most prominent champions of Darwin in Germany. This essay compares their contributions to popularizing the theory of evolution, drawing special attention to the neglected figure of du Bois-Reymond as a spokesman for a world devoid of natural purpose. It suggests that the historiography of the German reception of Darwin’s theory needs to be reassessed in the light of du Bois-Reymond’s Lucretian outlook.
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  17.  23
    Du Bois, Foucault, and Self-Torsion: Criterion of Imprisoned Art.Joshua M. Hall - 2014 - In Joshua M. Hall & Sarah Tyson (eds.), Philosophy Imprisoned: The Love of Wisdom in the Age of Mass Incarceration. Lanham, MD 20706, USA: pp. 105-124.
    [First paragraphs: This essay takes its practical orientation from my experiences as a member of a philosophy reading group on death row at Riverbend Maximum Security Penitentiary in Nashville, Tennessee. Its theoretical orientation comes from W. E. B. Du Bois’ lecture-turned-essay, “Criteria of Negro Art,” which argues that the realm of aesthetics is vitally important in the war against racial discrimination in the United States. And since, according to Michele Alexander’s critically-acclaimed The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the (...)
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  18.  24
    W.E.B. Du Bois’s Critique of Radical Reconstruction : A Hegelian Approach to American Modernity.Elvira Basevich - 2018 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 45 (2):168-185.
    In this essay, I argue that Hegel’s model of ethical life is normatively gripping for Du Bois’s critique of Radical Reconstruction. My argument proceeds in three steps. First, I use Du Bois’s insights to explain the nature of progressive political change in historical time, an account Hegel lacks. I reconstruct the normative basis of Du Bois's political critique by articulating the three essential features of public reasoning qua citizenship. Second, I defend the promise of black civic enfranchisement (...)
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  19.  65
    Racial Norms: A Reinterpretation of Du Bois' “The Conservation of Races”.David Miguel Gray - 2013 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 51 (4):465-487.
    I argue that standard explanations of Du Bois' theory of race inappropriately characterize his view as attempting to provide descriptive criteria for races. Such an interpretation makes it both susceptible to Appiah's circularity objection and alienates it from Du Bois' central project of solidarity—which is the central point of “Conservation.” I propose that we should understand his theory as providing a normative account of race: an attempt to characterize what some races should be in terms of what other (...)
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  20. Helmholtz, Du Bois-Reymond, and the Transcendent Difficulty of Explaining the Relation Between Sensations and the Physical World.Andrea Togni - 2017 - Studia Philosophica Estonica 10 (1):83-98.
    According to Hermann von Helmholtz, sensations are signs that external causes impress on our sense organs; those signs are then used by the mind to acquire knowledge of the reality. Helmholtz's work points out the difficulty of defining a notion of causality suitable for explaining the relation between sensations on the one hand and the physical world on the other. In fact, he states that: 1) Physical stimuli, understood as the causal origins of sensations, are unknowable in themselves; 2) There (...)
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  21. The Social Theory of W.E.B. Du Bois.W. E. B. Du Bois & Phil Zuckerman - 2004
  22. The Ascent of Man? Emil du Bois-Reymond's Reflections on Scientific Progress.Gabriel Finkelstein - 2000 - Endeavour 24 (3):129-132.
    Triumphalist histories of science are nothing new but were, in fact, a staple of the 19th century. This article considers one of the more famous works in the genre and argues that it was motivated by doubt more than by faith.
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  23.  33
    W. E. B. Du Bois's Critique of American Democracy During the Jim Crow Era: On the Limitations of Rawls and Honneth.Elvira Basevich - 2019 - Journal of Political Philosophy 27 (3):318-340.
  24. Ignorabimus! Emil du Bois-Raymond Und Die Debatte Über Die Grenzen Wissenschaftlicher Erkenntnis Im 19. Jahrhundert.Ferdinando Vidoni & Ludovico Geymonat - 1991 - P. Lang.
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  25. W.E.B. Du Bois on Race and Culture Philosophy, Politics, and Poetics.Bernard W. Bell, Emily Grosholz & James B. Stewart - 1996
     
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  26. Ignorabimus! Emil du Bois-Reymond E Il Dibattito Sui Limiti Della Conoscenza Scientifica Nell'ottocento.Ferdinando Vidoni & Ludovico Geymonat - 1988 - Marcos y Marcos.
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  27.  4
    Points de Vue sur la Grande Depression du Xive Siecle: Guy Bois et David Herlihy.François Seurot - 2001 - Journal des Economistes Et des Etudes Humaines 11 (1).
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  28.  21
    W. E. B. Du Bois’s “Conservation of Races:” A Metaphilosophical Text.Kimberly Ann Harris - 2019 - Metaphilosophy 50 (5):670-687.
    Nothing was more important for W. E. B. Du Bois than to promote the upward mobility of African Americans. This essay revisits his “The Conversation of Races” to demonstrate its general philosophical importance. Ultimately, Du Bois’s three motivations for giving the address reveal his view of the nature of philosophical inquiry: to critique earlier phenotypic conceptions of race, to show the essentiality of history, and to promote a reflexive practice. Commentators have been unduly invested in the hermeneutic readings (...)
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  29.  19
    Emil du Bois-Reymond: Neuroscience, Self, and Society in Nineteenth-Century Germany.Gabriel Finkelstein - 2013 - The MIT Press.
    This biography of Emil du Bois-Reymond, the most important forgotten intellectual of the nineteenth century, received an Honorable Mention for History of Science, Medicine, and Technology at the 2013 PROSE Awards, was shortlisted for the 2014 John Pickstone Prize (Britain's most prestigious award for the best scholarly book in the history of science), and was named by the American Association for the Advancement of Science as one of the Best Books of 2014. -/- In his own time (1818–1896) du (...)
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  30. The Uncompleted Argument: Du Bois and the Illusion of Race.Anthony Appiah - 1985 - Critical Inquiry 12 (1):21-37.
    Contemporary biologists are not agreed on the question of whether there are any human races, despite the widespread scientific consensus on the underlying genetics. For most purposes, however, we can reasonably treat this issue as terminological. What most people in most cultures ordinarily believe about the significance of “racial” difference is quite remote, I think, from what the biologists are agreed on. Every reputable biologist will agree that human genetic variability between the populations of Africa or Europe or Asia is (...)
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  31.  40
    Autorité rhétorique: Claude Bernard et Émile du Bois-Reymond.Gabriel Finkelstein - 2012 - In Jean-Gäel Barbara & Pierre Corvol (eds.), Les élèves de Claude Bernard: Les nouvelles disciplines bernardiennes au tournant du XXe siècle. Paris, France: pp. 173-192.
    Professeur Finkelstein avait posée la question, pourquoi, bien que leurs réalisations scientifiques et leur scientifique approche soient similaires, Bernard était beaucoup plus connu dans son pays, France, et à son époque, que Bois-Reymond en Allemagne? Une question similaire a été posée au sujet du pourquoi Darwin est connu pour la théorie de l'évolution, tandis que Wallace a été remis en arrière-fond dans leur temps et dans l'histoire. Selon Finkelstein, la cause de la differences entre Bois-Reymond et Bernard, peut (...)
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  32. Emil du Bois-Reymond on "The Seat of the Soul".Gabriel Finkelstein - 2014 - Journal of the History of the Neurosciences 23 (1):45-55.
    The German pioneer of electrophysiology, Emil du Bois-Reymond (1818–1896), is generally assumed to have remained silent on the subject of the brain. However, the archive of his papers in Berlin contains manuscript notes to a lecture on “The Seat of the Soul” that he delivered to popular audiences in 1884 and 1885. These notes demonstrate that cerebral localization and brain function in general had been concerns of his for quite some time, and that he did not shy away from (...)
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  33.  69
    Du Bois’ Democratic Defence of the Value Free Ideal.Liam Kofi Bright - 2018 - Synthese 195 (5):2227-2245.
    Philosophers of science debate the proper role of non-epistemic value judgements in scientific reasoning. Many modern authors oppose the value free ideal, claiming that we should not even try to get scientists to eliminate all such non-epistemic value judgements from their reasoning. W. E. B. Du Bois, on the other hand, has a defence of the value free ideal in science that is rooted in a conception of the proper place of science in a democracy. In particular, Du (...) argues that the value free ideal must be upheld in order to, first, retain public trust in science and, second, ensure that those best placed to make use of scientifically acquired information are able to do so. This latter argument turns out to relate Du Bois’ position on the value free ideal in science to his defence of epistemic democracy. In this essay I elaborate, motivate, and relate to the modern debate, Du Bois’ under-appreciated defence of the value free ideal. (shrink)
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  34. Emil du Bois-Reymond Vs Ludimar Hermann.Gabriel Finkelstein - 2006 - Comptes Rendus Biologies 329 (5-6):340-347.
    This essay recounts a controversy between a pioneer electrophysiologist, Emil du Bois-Reymond (1818–1896), and his student, Ludimar Hermann (1838–1914). Du Bois-Reymond proposed a molecular explanation for the slight electrical currents that he detected in frog muscles and nerves. Hermann argued that du Bois-Reymond's ‘resting currents’ were an artifact of injury to living tissue. He contested du Bois-Reymond's molecular model, explaining his teacher's observations as electricity produced by chemical decomposition. History has painted Hermann as the wronged party (...)
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  35.  56
    What’s in a World? Du Bois and Heidegger on Politics, Aesthetics, and Foundings.Ross Mittiga - 2019 - Contemporary Political Theory 18 (2):180-201.
    Central to W.E.B. Du Bois’s political theory is a conception of “world” remarkably similar to that put forward, years later, by Martin Heidegger. This point is more methodological than historical: I claim that approaching Du Bois’s work as a source, rather than as a product, of concepts that resonated with subsequent thinkers allows us to better appreciate the novelty and vision of his political theory. Exploring this resonance, I argue, helps to refine the notions of world and founding (...)
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  36.  69
    Mechanical Neuroscience: Emil du Bois-Reymond’s Innovations in Theory and Practice.Gabriel Finkelstein - 2015 - Frontiers 9 (130):1-4.
    Summary of the major innovations of Emil du Bois-Reymond (1818-1896).
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  37.  22
    From Oblivion to Post-History: Sublime Othering in Rider Haggard and W. E. B. Du Bois.S. N. Nyeck - 2019 - The European Legacy 24 (6):617-643.
    ABSTRACTThis article addresses the ways in which art and philosophy have been discursively used to conceptualize critical political changes and frame narratives of liberation by including and excluding primitive consciousness simultaneously. More concretely, it analyzes the contribution of art and philosophy to the understanding of history and post-history through different representations of black bodies, black desires, and black agencies in the novels She by Rider Haggard and The Quest of the Silver Fleece by W. E. B. Du Bois. At (...)
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  38. Representative Women: Slavery, Citizenship, and Feminist Theory in Du Bois's "Damnation of Women".Lawrie Balfour - 2005 - Hypatia 20 (3):127 - 148.
    In this essay, I contend that feminist theories of citizenship in the U.S. context must go beyond simply acknowledging the importance of race and grapple explicitly with the legacies of slavery. To sketch this case, I draw upon W.E.B. Du Bois's "The Damnation of Women," which explores the significance for all Americans of African American women's sexual, economic, and political lives under slavery and in its aftermath.
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  39.  22
    The Making of Modern Scientific Personae: The Scientist as a Moral Person? Emil Du Bois-Reymond and His Friends.Irmline Veit-Brause - 2002 - History of the Human Sciences 15 (4):19-49.
    This article examines the notion of the `scientist as a moral person' in the light of the early stages of the commodification of science and the transformation of research into a big enterprise, operating on the principle of the division of labour. These processes were set in train at the end of the 19th century. The article focuses on the concomitant changes in the public persona and the habitus of scientific entrepreneurs. I begin by showing the significance of the professional (...)
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  40.  49
    Pragmatism and the Practice of History: From Turner and Du Bois to Today.James T. Kloppenberg - 2004 - Metaphilosophy 35 (1-2):202-225.
    Pragmatism has affected American historical writing since the early twentieth century. Such contemporaries and students of Peirce, James, and Dewey as Frederick Jackson Turner, W. E. B. Du Bois, James Harvey Robinson, Charles Beard, Mary Beard, and Carl Becker drew on pragmatism when they fashioned what was called the “new history.” They wanted to topple inherited assumptions about the past and replace positivist historical methods with the pragmatists' model of a community of inquiry. Such widely read mid-twentieth-century historians as (...)
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  41.  34
    Matteucci and du Bois-Reymond: A Bitter Rivalry.Gabriel Finkelstein - 2011 - Archives Italiennes de Biologie 149 (4):29-37.
    This essay considers a long-standing controversy between two nineteenth century pioneers in electrophysiology: the German scientist Emil du Bois-Reymond (1818-1896), and his Italian rival Carlo Matteucci (1811-1868). Historians have generally described their disagreement in du Bois-Reymond’s terms: the product of a contrast in scientific outlook. While not discounting this interpretation, I want to suggest that the controversy was driven as much by the rivals’ similarity as it was by their difference.
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  42.  55
    Du Bois and Diasporic Identity: The Veil and the Unveiling Project.Judith R. Blau & Eric S. Brown - 2001 - Sociological Theory 19 (2):219-233.
    Positioning Du Bois's arguments in The Souls of Black Folk (1903) within social theory enhances our understanding of the phenomenological dimensions of racial oppression and of how oppressed groups build on members' differences, as well as on what they share, to construct a cosmopolitan and richly textured community. Du Bois wrote Souls just at the beginning of the Great Migration but indicated that geographical dispersion would deepen racial solidarity, enhance the meaningfulness of community, and emancipate individual group members (...)
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  43.  30
    M. Du Bois-Reymond Goes To Paris.Gabriel Finkelstein - 2003 - British Journal for the History of Science 36 (3):261-300.
    This article examines the science of electrophysiology developed by Emil du Bois-Reymond in Berlin in the 1840s. In it I recount his major findings, the most significant being his proof of the electrical nature of nerve signals. Du Bois-Reymond also went on to detect this same ‘negative variation’, or action current, in live human subjects. In 1850 he travelled to Paris to defend this startling claim. The essay concludes with a discussion of why his demonstration failed to convince (...)
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  44.  78
    On Du Bois’ Notion of Double Consciousness.Frank M. Kirkland - 2013 - Philosophy Compass 8 (2):137-148.
    The recent reception of Du Bois’ notion of “double consciousness” in the humanities has affirmed the notion as crucial and pivotal throughout his work. In contrast, its recent reception in the social sciences has tended to reject its centrality and importance. This essay will give general credence to the former position but, more importantly, show why a turn to Rousseau’s conception of amour‐propre may illuminate the importance of “double consciousness” in and for Du Bois’ 1903 work The Souls (...)
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  45.  13
    Beyond the Psychological Wage: Du Bois on White Dominion.Ella Myers - 2019 - Political Theory 47 (1):6-31.
    W.E.B. Du Bois’s reading of whiteness as a “public and psychological wage” is enormously influential. This essay examines another, lesser known facet of Du Bois’s account of racialized identity: his conceptualization of whiteness as dominion. In his 1920–1940 writings, “modern” whiteness appears as a proprietary orientation toward the planet in general and toward “darker peoples” in particular. This “title to the universe” is part of chattel slavery’s uneven afterlife, in which the historical fact of “propertized human life” endures (...)
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  46.  19
    Historical Fiction as Sociological Interpretation and Philosophy: On the Two Methodological Registers of W. E. B. Du Bois' The Black Flame[REVIEW]Amir Jaima - 2017 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 53 (4):584.
    Between 1957 and 1961, W. E. B. Du Bois wrote a lengthy work of historical fiction, a trilogy collectively titled The Black Flame. Through the lenses of four American families, the narrative offers an illuminating glimpse into the American, political drama of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, focusing on the degree to which “the negro problem” featured in important decisions and events. Reiterating ideas found in his other works—like Black Reconstruction —the narrative foregrounds the gravity of the (...)
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  47.  37
    Representative Women: Slavery, Citizenship, and Feminist Theory in Du Bois's “Damnation of Women”.Lawrie Balfour - 2005 - Hypatia 20 (3):127-148.
  48.  13
    What Race Terms Do: Du Bois, Biology, and Psychology on the Meanings of "Race".Glenn Trujillo - 2018 - Southwest Philosophy Review 34 (1):235-247.
    This paper does two things. First, it interprets the work of W. E. B. Du Bois to reveal that the meanings of race terms are grounded by both a historical and an aspirational component. Race terms refer to a backward-looking component that traces the history of the group to its present time, as well as a forward-looking component that sets out values and goals for the group. Race terms thus refer to a complex cluster of concepts that involve biological, (...)
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  49.  12
    Awful Gladness”: The Dual Political Rhetorics of Du Bois’s “Of the Passing of the First-Born.Annie Menzel - 2019 - Political Theory 47 (1):32-56.
    W.E.B. Du Bois’s elegy for his infant son, “Of the Passing of the First-Born,” in The Souls of Black Folk, has received relatively scant attention from political theorists. Yet it illuminates crucial developments in Du Bois’s political thought. It memorializes a tragedy central to his turn from scientific facts to rhetorical appeals to emotion. Its rhetoric also exemplifies a broader tension in his writings, between masculinist and elitist commitments and more insurrectionary impulses. In its normalizing rhetorical mode, which (...)
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  50.  9
    Confessing Race: Toward a Global Ecclesiology After Bonhoeffer and Du Bois.David Robinson - 2016 - Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics 36 (2):121-139.
    Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s account of a transnational “confessing” church, developed with allusion to W.E.B. Du Bois, offers critical potential for addressing the problem of the global color line. To make this case, I first trace the ways in which Du Bois’s and Bonhoeffer’s German–American exchange studies contribute to their critical standpoints. Bonhoeffer’s “Protestantism without Reformation” is then examined to show that its view of American denominations is not mere German paternalism but a critique of how atomized churches can mask (...)
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