Parenthood

Edited by Anca Gheaus (Universitat Pompeu Fabra)
Related categories
Subcategories:History/traditions: Parenthood

245 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 245
Material to categorize
  1. The Moral Significance of the Genetic Relation.Edmund Abegg - 1984 - Journal of Medical Humanities 5 (2):127-144.
    Our ordinary moral attitudes give a prominent place to the principle that each person ought specially to care for any child who is his or her genetic offspring. From this principle of genetic-parental responsibility and other plausible premises, we can derive the principle that each person has the right to control the genetic use of his or her own genes. But there are competing principles of parental responsibility that require consideration. Principles of nurture are among the important competitors. Also, the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. Moral Duties of Parents and Nontherapeutic Clinical Research Procedures Involving Children.Terrence F. Ackerman - 1980 - Bioethics Quarterly 2 (2):94-111.
    Shared views regarding the moral respect which is owed to children in family life are used as a guide in determining the moral permissibility of nontherapeutic clinical research procedures involving children. The comparison suggests that it is not appropriate to seek assent from the preadolescent child. The analogy with interventions used in family life is similarly employed to specify the permissible limit of risk to which children may be exposed in nontherapeutic research procedures. The analysis indicates that recent writers misconceive (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  3. The Dilemma of Revealing Sensitive Information on Paternity Status in Arabian Social and Cultural Contexts.Abdallah A. Adlan & Henk Amj ten Have - 2012 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 9 (4):403-409.
    Telling the truth is one of the most respected virtues in medical history and one of the most emphasized in the code of medical ethics. Health care providers are frequently confronted with the dilemma as to whether or not to tell the truth. This dilemma deepens when both choices are critically vicious: The choice is no longer between “right and right” or “right and wrong,” it is between “wrong and wrong.” In the case presented and discussed in this paper, a (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   8 citations  
  4. Forgiveness Education with Parentally Love-Deprived College Students.R. Al-Mubak, R. D. Enright & P. Cardis - 1995 - Journal of Moral Education 14:427-444.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. Fatherhood - Philosophy for Everyone: The Dao of Daddy.Fritz Allhoff, Lon Nease & Michael W. Austin (eds.) - 2010 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    _Fatherhood - Philosophy for Everyone_ offers fathers wisdom and practical advice drawn from the annals of philosophy. Both thought-provoking and humorous, it provides a valuable starting and ending point for reflecting on this crucial role. Address the roles, experiences, ethics, and challenges of fatherhood from a philosophical perspective Includes essays on Confucius, Socrates, the experience of African fatherhood, and the perspective of two women writers Explores the changing role of fatherhood and investigates what it means to be a father An (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. Biomedical Ethics Reviews: Reproduction, Technology, and Rights.Robert Almeder & James Humber (eds.) - 1996
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. Intimacy and Parental Rights.Scott A. Altman - 2012 - In Marmor Andrei (ed.), The Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Law. Routledge. pp. 305.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. Pediatric Contribution to the Present Knowledge on the Neurobehavioral Status of Infants at Birth.Claudine Amiel-Tison - 1985 - In Jacques Mehler & R. Fox (eds.), Neonate Cognition: Beyond the Blooming Buzzing Confusion. Lawrence Erlbaum.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. A Dash of Autism.Jami L. Anderson - 2013 - In Jami L. Anderson Simon Cushing (ed.), The Philosophy of Autism. Rowman & Littlefield.
    In this chapter, I describe my “post-diagnosis” experiences as the parent of an autistic child, those years in which I tried, but failed, to make sense of the overwhelming and often nonsensical information I received about autism. I argue that immediately after being given an autism diagnosis, parents are pressured into making what amounts to a life-long commitment to a therapy program that (they are told) will not only dramatically change their child, but their family’s financial situation and even their (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. On Being Genetically "Irresponsible".Judith Andre, Leonard M. Fleck & Thomas Tomlinson - 2000 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 10 (2):129-146.
    : New genetic technologies continue to emerge that allow us to control the genetic endowment of future children. Increasingly the claim is made that it is morally "irresponsible" for parents to fail to use such technologies when they know their possible children are at risk for a serious genetic disorder. We believe such charges are often unwarranted. Our goal in this article is to offer a careful conceptual analysis of the language of irresponsibility in an effort to encourage more care (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  11. Procreation and Parenthood: The Ethics of Bearing and Rearing Children.David Archard & David Benatar (eds.) - 2010 - Oxford University Press.
    Procreation and Parenthood offers new and original essays by leading philosophers on some of the main ethical issues raised by these activities.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  12. Egalitarianism and the Undeserving Poor.Richard J. Arneson - 1997 - Journal of Political Philosophy 5 (4):327–350.
    Recently in the U.S. a near-consensus has formed around the idea that it would be desirable to "end welfare as we know it," in the words of President Bill Clinton.1 In this context, the term "welfare" does not refer to the entire panoply of welfare state provision including government sponsored old age pensions, government provided medical care for the elderly, unemployment benefits for workers who have lost their jobs without being fired for cause, or aid to the disabled. "Welfare" in (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   13 citations  
  13. Questioning Honor: A Parent–Teacher Conflict Over Excellence and Diversity in a USA Urban High School.Jane S. Attanucci * - 2004 - Journal of Moral Education 33 (1):57-69.
    Parent?teacher relations are often characterized as highly conflictual in the educational literature, with scant empirical evidence of how the disagreements occur in everyday talk. Close analysis of a teacher's account of an intense conflict with a student's mother over the National Honor Society grounds the abstract discourses of merit and difference in the worlds of parents, teachers and students. Narrating primarily through reported speech, in a ?she said, I said? fashion, the teacher recreates her conversations about the National Honor Society (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14. Changing Subjects: Growing Up and Growing Older.Jane Attanucci - 1991 - Journal of Moral Education 20 (3):317-328.
    Abstract Following a review of the changing uses of narrative in moral development research, a personal narrative from an interview with a secondary teacher, who is also a parent of an adolescent is analyzed. Without standard question interruptions, the narrator crafts an ironic tale of contradictory feelings and actions. Trust is proposed as both an affective and evidential/proof dimension of the relationship between adolescents and adults, as well as among all concerned about moral development and education.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  15. The Failure of Biological Accounts of Parenthood.Michael W. Austin - 2004 - Journal of Value Inquiry 38 (4):499-510.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16. Having and Raising Children: Unconventional Families, Hard Choices, Social Good (Review).Isaac D. Balbus - 2002 - Hypatia 17 (2):162-165.
  17. Liberal Daddy Quotas: Why Men Should Take Care of the Children, and How Liberals Can Get Them to Do It.Linda Barclay - 2013 - Hypatia 28 (1):163-178.
    The gendered division of labor is the major cause of gender inequality with respect to the broad spectrum of resources, occupations, and roles. Although many feminists aspire to an equality of outcome where there are no significant patterns of gender difference across these dimensions, many have also argued that liberal theories of social justice do not have the conceptual tools to justify a direct attack on the gendered division of labor. Indeed, many critics argue that liberalism positively condones it, presuming (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  18. Value Transmission in the Family: Do Adolescents Accept the Values Their Parents Want to Transmit?Daniela Barni, Sonia Ranieri, Eugenia Scabini & Rosa Rosnati - 2011 - Journal of Moral Education 40 (1):105-121.
    This study focused on value transmission in the family and assessed adolescents? acceptance of the values their parents want to transmit to them (socialisation values), identifying some factors that may affect the level of acceptance. Specifically, actual value agreement between parents, parental agreement as perceived by adolescents, parent?child closeness and promotion of child?s volitional functioning, were considered as predictors. Participants were 381 family triads (father, mother and adolescent child) from northern Italy; the adolescents (46.2% male) were all high?school students from (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  19. An Argument Against Spanking.Gary Bartlett - 2010 - Public Affairs Quarterly 24 (1):65-78.
    I sketch a non-rights-based grounding for the impermissibility of spanking. Even if children have no right against being spanked, I contend that spanking can be seen to be impermissible without appeal to such a right. My approach is primarily consequentialist but also has affinities with virtue ethics, for it emphasizes the moral importance of avoiding bad habits in one’s behavior toward one’s children.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20. The Identity-Enactment Account of Associative Duties.Saba Bazargan-Forward - forthcoming - Philosophical Studies:1-20.
    Associative duties are agent-centered duties to give defeasible moral priority to our special ties. Our strongest associative duties are to close friends and family. According to reductionists, our associative duties are just special duties—i.e., duties arising from what I have done to others, or what others have done to me. These include duties to abide by promises and contracts, compensate our benefactors in ways expressing gratitude, and aid those whom we have made especially vulnerable to our conduct. I argue, though, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21. In Defense of Fatherhood.Richard Paul Belleville - 1992 - Dissertation, Boston College
    If fatherhood is a role of man that is decisively important for an ecological family life then his formation, his duties and his attitudes are a proper subject for enquiry. Though this topic is treated very sparingly by philosophers, insights from Kierkegaard, Ortega y Gasset and others will be investigated as sources for developing this issue. ;The purpose of this dissertation is to demonstrate that a comprehensive view of fatherhood can be developed by synthesizing the contributions of various philosophers and (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22. The Limits of Reproductive Freedom.David Benatar - 2010 - In David Archard & David Benatar (eds.), Procreation and Parenthood: The Ethics of Bearing and Rearing Children. Oxford University Press.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23. Better Never to Have Been: The Harm of Coming Into Existence.David Benatar - 2006 - New York ;Oxford University Press.
    Better Never to Have Been argues for a number of related, highly provocative, views: (1) Coming into existence is always a serious harm. (2) It is always wrong to have children. (3) It is wrong not to abort fetuses at the earlier stages of gestation. (4) It would be better if, as a result of there being no new people, humanity became extinct. These views may sound unbelievable--but anyone who reads Benatar will be obliged to take them seriously.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   28 citations  
  24. The Unbearable Lightness of Bringing Into Being.David Benatar - 1999 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 16 (2):173–180.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  25. Value Education as Perceived by Parents, Teachers and Pupils in Israel.Miriam Ben‐Peretz & Lya Kremer - 1982 - Journal of Moral Education 11 (4):259-265.
    Abstract The perplexity that characterizes moral education was the motive for undertaking this study. A field selection of terminal and instrumental values served as its frame of reference. Two questions were posed by the investigators: Is there any difference in the degree of importance which parents, teachers and pupils attach to these values? Do different schools rate these values differently? A sample consisting of 531 pupils, 251 parents and 38 teachers, randomly selected from five Israeli high schools, were asked to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26. Fostering Goodness: Teaching Parents to Facilitate Children's Moral Development.Marvin W. Berkowitz & John H. Grych - 1998 - Journal of Moral Education 27 (3):371-391.
    Although moral development of children has long been ascribed predominantly to the effects of parenting, there has been little systematic examination of the specific nature of this relation. In this paper, we identify four foundational components of children's moral development (social orientation, self?control, compliance, self?esteem) and four central aspects of moral functioning (empathy, conscience, moral reasoning, altruism). The parenting roots of each of these eight psychological characteristics are examined, and five core parenting processes (induction, nurturance, demandingness, modelling, democratic family process) (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   8 citations  
  27. Doing the Best for One's Child: Satisficing Versus Optimizing Parentalism. [REVIEW]Jeffrey Blustein - 2012 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 33 (3):199-205.
    The maxim “parents should do what is in the best interests of their child” seems like an unassailable truth, and yet, as I argue here, there are serious problems with it when it is taken seriously. One problem concerns the sort of demands such a principle places on parents; the other concerns its larger social implications when conceived as part of a national policy for the rearing of children. The theory of parenting that creates these problems I call “optimizing parentalism.” (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  28. Morality and Parenting: An Ethical Framework for Decisions About the Treatment of Imperiled Newborns.Jeffrey Blustein - 1988 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 9 (1).
    This essay is written in the belief that questions relating to the treatment of impaired and imperiled newborns cannot be adequately resolved in the absence of a general moral theory of parent-child relations. The rationale for treatment decisions in these cases should be consistent with principles that ought to govern the normal work of parenting. The first section of this paper briefly examines the social contract theory elaborated by John Rawls in his renowned book A Theory of Justice and extracts (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29. Parents and Children: The Ethics of the Family.Jeffrey Blustein - 1985 - Journal of Philosophy 82 (6):330-332.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   11 citations  
  30. Understandings of Efficacy: Cross-National Perspectives on 'What Works' in Supporting Parents and Families.Janet Boddy, Marjorie Smith & June Statham - 2011 - Ethics and Education 6 (2):181-196.
    The research literature on parenting support typically focuses on English-speaking countries, such as England, the United States and Australia. This article draws on a review, commissioned by the English government, which examined policies and services to support parenting in five European countries: Denmark, France, Germany, Italy and the Netherlands, and considered the evidence for effectiveness. In exploring differences between the five countries, and with England, this article raises questions about the way in which understandings of ?what works? can inform the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  31. Do We Have an Obligation to Make Smarter Babies?Lisa Bortolotti - 2009 - In T. Takala, P. Herrisone-Kelly & S. Holm (eds.), Cutting Through the Surface. Philosophical Approaches to Bioethics. Rodopi.
    In this paper I consider some issues concerning cognitive enhancements and the ethics of enhancing in reproduction and parenting. I argue that there are moral reasons to enhance the cognitive capacities of the children one has, or of the children one is going to have, and that these enhancements should not be seen as an alternative to pursuing important changes in society that might also improve one’s own and one’s children’s life. It has been argued that an emphasis on enhancing (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32. Reproductive and Parental Autonomy: An Argument for Compulsory Parental Education.Lisa Bortolotti & Daniela Cutas - 2009 - Reproductive Biomedicine Online 19 (ethics suppl.):5-14.
    In this paper we argue that society should make available reliable information about parenting to everybody from an early age. The reason why parental education is important (when offered in a comprehensive and systematic way) is that it can help young people understand better the responsibilities associated with reproduction, and the skills required for parenting. This would allow them to make more informed life-choices about reproduction and parenting, and exercise their autonomy with respect to these choices. We do not believe (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  33. Licensing Parents in International Contract Pregnancies.Andrew Botterell & Carolyn McLeod - 2016 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 33 (2):178-196.
    The Hague Conference on Private International Law currently has a Parentage/Surrogacy Project, which evaluates the legal status of children in cross-border situations, including situations involving international contract pregnancy. Should a convention focusing on international contract pregnancy emerge from this project, it will need to be consistent with the Hague convention on Intercountry Adoption. The latter convention prohibits adoptions unless, among other things, ‘the competent authorities of the receiving State have determined that the prospective adoptive parents are eligible and suited to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34. Parents and Children in Assisted Procreation: Psychological Reflections Concerning a Medical Journey.C. Bourg - 1999 - Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 5 (1):3.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35. Equality, Autonomy, and the Price of Parenting.Paul Bou‐Habib & Serena Olsaretti - 2013 - Journal of Social Philosophy 44 (4):420-438.
  36. Parental Licensing Meets Evolutionary Psychology.Tomislav Bracanović - 2012 - Ethical Perspectives 19 (2):207-233.
    Hugh LaFollette has proposed that in order to prevent statistically expected harm that many parents inflict on their children prospective parents should be licensed. This article evaluates his proposal by looking at various facts, statistical data and probability estimates related to sex differences in human mating and parenting behaviour provided by evolutionary psychology. It is suggested that these evolutionary considerations create a serious stalemate between certain basic moral principles to which LaFollette subscribes, thus rendering the entire proposal morally impracticable. It (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37. Fatherhood and Child Support: Do Men Have a Right to Choose?Elizabeth Brake - 2005 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 22 (1):55–73.
  38. Procreation and Parenthood.Elizabeth Brake & Joseph Millum - 2012 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39. Fathers and Intergenerational Transmission in Social Context.Julia Brannen, Violetta Parutis, Ann Mooney & Valerie Wigfall - 2011 - Ethics and Education 6 (2):155-170.
    This article takes an intergenerational lens to the study of fathers. It draws on evidence from two economic and social research council-funded intergenerational studies of fathers, one of which focused on four-generation British families and the other which included new migrant (Polish) fathers. The article suggests both patterns of change and continuity in fatherhood across the generations. It demonstrates how cultural forces and material conditions need to combine to facilitate change in fathers? exercise of agency and how social class and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40. Review of Christine Overall, Why Have Children: The Ethical Debate. [REVIEW]Andrea Mechanick Braverman - 2012 - American Journal of Bioethics 12 (8):42 - 42.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 8, Page 42, August 2012.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41. From Father to Son: Generative Care and Gradual Conversion in William James's Writing ofThe Varieties.Lynn Bridgers & John R. Snarey - 2003 - Journal of Moral Education 32 (4):329-340.
    Using a historical and biographical, then developmental, approach, this article examines William James's spiritual family history by reviewing key events in the life of his father, Henry James, Sr. It pays particular attention to Henry Sr's tumultuous relationship with his own father, William James of Albany, and Henry Sr's subsequent conversion to the religious thought of Emmanuel Swedenborg. James's writing of The Varieties of Religious Experience can be seen as integral to his moral and religious development; that is, it functioned (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42. When the Home Becomes a Prison: Living with a Severely Disabled Child.B. S. Brinchmann - 1999 - Nursing Ethics 6 (2):137-143.
    The aim of this study was to generate knowledge about how parents who have been part of an ethical decision-making process concerning a son or daughter in a neonatal unit experience life with a severely disabled child. A descriptive study design was chosen using 30 hours of field observations and seven in-depth interviews, carried out over a period of five months with parents who had been faced with ethical decisions concerning their own children in a neonatal unit. Strauss and Glaser’s (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  43. Parental Love and the Meaning of Life.Berit Brogaard - 2016 - In Leo Zaibert (ed.), The Theory and Practice of Ontology (festschrift for Barry Smith edited by Leo Zaibert.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44. Rights to Privacy in Research: Adolescents Versus Parents.Jeanne Brooks-Gunn & Mary Jane Rotheram-Borus - 1994 - Ethics and Behavior 4 (2):109 – 121.
    Conducting research on adolescents raises a number of ethical issues not often confronted in research on younger children. In part, these differences are due to the fact that although assent is usually not an issue, given cognitive and social competencies, the life situations and behavior of youth make it more difficult to balance rights and privacy of the adolescents. In this article, the three ethical principles of beneficence, justice, and respect for persons are discussed in terms of their application to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  45. Care of the Handicapped Newborn: Parental Responsibility and Medical Responsibility.M. J. Brueton - 1988 - Journal of Medical Ethics 14 (1):48-49.
  46. Fatherhood - Philosophy for Everyone: The Dao of Daddy.Adrienne Burgess - 2011 - Wiley-Blackwell.
  47. Indoctrination and Parental Rights.Eamonn Callan - 1985 - Philosophy of Education 41:97-106.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  48. Should the Baby Live? The Problem of Handicapped Infants.A. G. M. Campbell - 1986 - Journal of Medical Ethics 12 (4):212-213.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49. Offering Testicular Tissue Cryopreservation to Boys: The Increasing Importance of Biological Fatherhood.Lisa Campo-Engelstein - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics: 13 (3):39 - 40.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  50. Unthinkable Fathering: Connecting Incest and Nuclearism.Jane Caputi - 1994 - Hypatia 9 (2):102 - 122.
    The examination of cultural productions with nuclear themes reveals the regular recurrence of the theme of incestuous fatherhood. Connections include a nuclear-father figure, one who threatens dependents while purportedly protecting them; the desecration of the future; the betrayal of trust; insidious long-term effects after initial harm; the shattering of safety; the cult of secrecy, aided by psychological defenses of denial, numbing, and splitting (in both survivor and perpetrator); the violation of life-preservative taboos; and survival.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 245